Author Topic: Whats the attraction of wild camping?  (Read 2324 times)

richardh1905

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #30 on: 20:58:59, 04/06/20 »
The term wild camping for the best part of a decade on walking forums seems to, on balance have been the traveller (on foot) who camps at dusk and breaks camp at dawn. The person trying to connect with nature is looking for some thing more is there as case to provide additional terminology to separate these two underlying motives.


I don't see the need for that - I wild camp for both reasons.


What I dislike is the use of the term Wild Camping when applied to camper van owners who pull over in a layby for the night. But I'm not losing sleep over it.

SteamyTea

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #31 on: 21:33:06, 04/06/20 »
Interesting about the disconnected from nature comments.
When I was a preschool kid, we lived in a city, then on the edge of a new town.  Nature never high up the agenda in my family, they preferred cocktails at 5PM and a night in front of the Redifusion.  Apart from the very occasional walks across the golf links, a trip or two to the zoo, I cannot remember anything to do with 'nature' until I was a teenager.  Then we lived back in the West Indies and I discovered snorkelling and diving.
Then life took over and I never had a chance to spend much time, apart from my school was in a farming area.
What has changed in these last 50 years is the amount of 'nature' programs on TV, some are absolutely fantastic.  Who would have though that Spring Watch would be a bigger hit than The Thick of It, and a topic of conversation at work.  I suspect that more people watch the Attenborough stuff than watched The Wire.
So I think that people are connected to nature but just engage in it differently.  Similar to people liking space stuff, but very few people go there.
Personally I would get rid of zoos and replace them with decent video shows (though I am fascinated by insects and fish).
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Sevenup

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #32 on: 21:57:27, 04/06/20 »

I don't see the need for that - I wild camp for both reasons.


What I dislike is the use of the term Wild Camping when applied to camper van owners who pull over in a layby for the night. But I'm not losing sleep over it.


I’m a motorhome owner and I believe that wild camping in a van is a bit of nonsense, particularly in Scotland. The lack of facilities comparable with those in many a French village or town means that human waste And dish water is dumped around the countryside in the odd ditch or hedgerow. Last week in Glencoe highlighted the problem because there’s been no campsites open. I’d like to see the French Aire or German Stellplatz model adopted here and van owners forced to use a recognisable site even if it’s a farmers field set aside for the purpose. The NC500 is a particular sore point despite the economic benefits of tourism in remote areas but island areas like a Mull and Skye can be hard hit with swarms of the beasts.

April

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #33 on: 22:09:33, 04/06/20 »
I don't actually like wild camping but it's worth the hundreds of pounds I've spent on gear to occasionally spoil April and beefy's night  :-*

 ;D
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richardh1905

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #34 on: 07:59:47, 05/06/20 »

I’m a motorhome owner and I believe that wild camping in a van is a bit of nonsense, particularly in Scotland. The lack of facilities comparable with those in many a French village or town means that human waste And dish water is dumped around the countryside in the odd ditch or hedgerow. Last week in Glencoe highlighted the problem because there’s been no campsites open. I’d like to see the French Aire or German Stellplatz model adopted here and van owners forced to use a recognisable site even if it’s a farmers field set aside for the purpose. The NC500 is a particular sore point despite the economic benefits of tourism in remote areas but island areas like a Mull and Skye can be hard hit with swarms of the beasts.

Yuk!

I was once the proud (but increasingly frustrated and disillusioned) owner of an elderly Toyota camper van - we always chose campsites. Would hardly consider it wild being parked up beside a road! Same applies to camping in a tent beside the road, which I have occasionally done as a matter of expediency - hardly my idea of wild camping, not the same experience at all.
« Last Edit: 08:03:08, 05/06/20 by richardh1905 »

Islandplodder

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #35 on: 08:17:11, 05/06/20 »
I haven't camped for over 30 years, but I have seen many sunsets and even a few sunrises from the tops of hills, and managed to spend quite a bit of time in remote places, often looking for a plant I want to find.But, thinking travel might be a bit different for a while, I bought a lightweight 1 man tent (well, as light as I could afford) which arrived a couple of weeks ago.  Confession time.  In Scotland there is more emphasis on staying local and not going into people's houses than on exactly where you spend the night.  So the other night, when the wind finally dropped, I packed up a rucksack and headed a couple of miles out west, pitched my little tent where I could see the sea, and the sunset, and the next morning, after a bit of gazing at the view and eating a banana and a muesli bar, packed it up and went home.  Didn't see a soul from when I walked out of my front door to when I walked back in it.What I liked: Being out on my own, being in the place.What I didn't like: midges (I had marked out a nice sheltered spot in the dunes, but it was too sheltered, I had to move round the shore a bit to catch some breeze.)  Carrying the stuff, tent, mat, sleeping bag etc.  How do you manage with wine as well April? That was the one thing missing!  I'm small and getting on a bit, and I'm not a huge fan of carrying a big pack.  I'm hoping to cycle with the tent though, when things relax a bit.

April

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #36 on: 08:34:03, 05/06/20 »
How do you manage with wine as well April? That was the one thing missing! 

I have a Sherpa called beefy who carries it  ;)

I may move to Scotland if you are allowed to go wild camping at the moment  ;)

I am pleased you got out and enjoyed it  O0
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

Sevenup

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #37 on: 08:39:26, 05/06/20 »
Yuk!

I was once the proud (but increasingly frustrated and disillusioned) owner of an elderly Toyota camper van - we always chose campsites. Would hardly consider it wild being parked up beside a road! Same applies to camping in a tent beside the road, which I have occasionally done as a matter of expediency - hardly my idea of wild camping, not the same experience at all.
I like the motorhome. It’s 7 metres long and has every comfort I need. In Scotland it’s best to use campsites in my opinion. Some smaller towns and villages in parts of Scotland are plagued by them and it would be good to get the Scottish government on board with the development of municipal services parking areas like the French and Germans do. Had the virus not interfered I would be in the Epernay area tasting Champagne at the start of 6 weeks in France walking, cycling and drinking. Unfortunately this will be the last year of ownership because I can’t justify the pollution from the diesel.

richardh1905

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #38 on: 09:16:11, 05/06/20 »
I haven't camped for over 30 years, but I have seen many sunsets and even a few sunrises from the tops of hills, and managed to spend quite a bit of time in remote places, often looking for a plant I want to find.But, thinking travel might be a bit different for a while, I bought a lightweight 1 man tent (well, as light as I could afford) which arrived a couple of weeks ago.  Confession time.  In Scotland there is more emphasis on staying local and not going into people's houses than on exactly where you spend the night.  So the other night, when the wind finally dropped, I packed up a rucksack and headed a couple of miles out west, pitched my little tent where I could see the sea, and the sunset, and the next morning, after a bit of gazing at the view and eating a banana and a muesli bar, packed it up and went home.  Didn't see a soul from when I walked out of my front door to when I walked back in it...


Wonderful stuff - been sorely tempted here in the Lakes, but now is NOT the time in England.

barewirewalker

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #39 on: 09:25:05, 05/06/20 »

I don't see the need for that - I wild camp for both reasons.


After 5 years spent on a Local Access Forum, if have learnt that an understanding between walkers of different persuasions may seem reasonable. This understanding is not transferred to the argument between occupier and user. So when an issue becomes subject to press interest, the generalities get confused and transfered from type of camping to another.

So if in the case of LD routes a wild camper, of the up and away at dawn type, in marginal land may not be tolerated, because of stories related in the press about several day campers trashing areas in remote places.

In all forms of lobbying it s important to have a strong and clear line of reasoning.
BWW
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Mel

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #40 on: 09:53:19, 05/06/20 »

Well the topic's done well to last a couple of pages before going off topic  ::)


Pleb, are you thinking of giving wild camping a go?  I'm sure beefy could lend you a bit of basic gear  O0   :D





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rural roamer

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #41 on: 10:19:43, 05/06/20 »

New thread on campervans and motorhomes?  ;D


Wild camping has never appealed to me, I like my creature comforts too much! But each to their own, we all like different things as has been said many a time before on this forum. 



It amazes me that when planning a multiday walk, so many rigidly restrict their schedules around B&Bs etc. It seems they are terrified of not having toilets, showers and a bed to sleep in - why?. They are not necessary and make you dependent on external factors, it's all encumbering baggage and it can all be jettisoned. You'll feel empowered and far better off without it.
You are talking about me here so your statement offends me somewhat. We have planned and walked many long distance walks, using a mixture of pubs, B&Bs and farms, and baggage transfer services. We are not “terrified” as you say, it’s the way we choose to do our walk, just as others want to wild camp. We have enjoyed all our walks in good and bad weather and still felt close to nature. Anyway if we all took to wild camping you’d all be complaining there were too many tents on the hills!

Sevenup

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #42 on: 10:45:44, 05/06/20 »
The Scottish arrangements for land access have been stretched by motorhomers and vanners to the detriment of us all. There was even a motorhome wild camping Facebook page. For me wild camping involves pitching a tent somewhere (or a bivvy). Scotland is ideally suited to this kind of land access.


I have a relative with a penchant for old Landrover who recently bought a roof tent for his landy to go ‘wild camping’. I kid you not.

Islandplodder

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #43 on: 10:53:38, 05/06/20 »
Generally speaking I think I am on your side of the fence Rural Roamer, though I have only used baggage transfer once, I thought it was wonderful.  I bought the tent as I thought it might be the only practical way of travelling for a while once we are all set free.  There are also one or two places I want to go, such as up Glen Tilt and across the Lairig Rhu where I think I would have to camp.  It's a bit of a trade off, I can't walk as far when carrying camping stuff (it's not so much the tent as everything else that goes with it), so it would take me longer, so there would be more need to camp.


Islandplodder

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Re: Whats the attraction of wild camping?
« Reply #44 on: 11:06:31, 05/06/20 »
Actually, I might have been stretching the rules a bit, but if wild camping is not allowed up here it is in the small print, which I carefully didn't read.  The headline rules don't stipulate coming home at night, just staying within about 5 miles of home, avoiding inessential travel and not going into other people's houses or meeting inside.  I was within all of that.
It's a bit weird here, the Islands have really pulled the drawbridge up, tourists can't get here, and we can't get off.  That meant I had to skulk around a bit to get out and back, as a person with a rucksack would have caused no end of alarm and despondency among my neighbours, unless they got the binoculars out to check who it was, which tbh they probably would.  Luckily, I didn't have to pass any houses.