Author Topic: TR - White Pike  (Read 1072 times)

richardh1905

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TR - White Pike
« on: 14:34:04, 14/06/20 »
White Pike   

13th June 2020

Forecast was for improving weather so we decided to go for a family outing up onto the fells on Sunday. We wanted somewhere a bit off the beaten track, yet not too far away, and I remembered Karl's Around Dunnerdale Trip Report from February - Natty Bridge had stuck in my mind. Karl had climbed Caw, but I had been up there with my youngest son last summer, so we chose White Pike and the ridge along to Dow Crag as our objective - I did fancy a look at Cold Tarn too, somewhere else that I have yet to visit. We drove to Torver and then drove up narrow Hummers Lane to the SW, parking at the largest of the car parks beside the forestry plantation.



https://my.viewranger.com/route/details/MzExMjYwNA==

We walked south west along the minor road, dark clouds above us but brighter skies towards the coast. The spring flowers have been replaced by summer flowers, Yellow Rattle, Foxgloves, Red Clover, Hawkweed, Lady's Bedstraw, Birds Foot Trefoil - a real joy. After half a mile or so, we took a footpath over a stile and entered the woods; this path took us over boardwalks and across a forest road to the atmospheric ruins at Appletree Worth - love the name.


White Pike (left) from the forest track that we crossed on the way to Appletree Worth. Coniston Old Man has his head in the clouds.


The enchanting ruins at Appletree Worth


Slippery stepping stones crossing Appletree Worth Beck- we used the nearby stone footbridge.

Rather than take the footpath that cuts across the southern flank of The Knott, we chose to follow a forest road that curls around to the south, not a big diversion and easy going, and it took us past some fine larch trees. The track curved around to the north, and then climbed steadily upwards above the eastern bank of the River Lickle, which burbled away below us. Spotted some insectivorous Butterwort in the ditch beside the track.


Insectivorous Butterwort - we could see midges and greenfly stuck to the leaves


White Pike from the forest road that runs up the Lickle valley - it looks steep!

A gate led onto the open fellside above the forest, and we crossed Natty Bridge, Tess our spaniel whining a bit because she didn't like seeing the drop between the planks! As we climbed, it started raining so it was out with the waterproofs. The bridleway splits in a few places, but we just kept heading upwards and we eventually emerged onto the western flank of White Pike overlooking Dunnerdale, with the Walna Scar Quarry spoil tips ahead. Thankfully, the rain had stopped.


Looking back down the Lickle Valley, Natty Bridge visible to the left.

The western flank of White Pike looked quite formidable above us - steep scree with a line of crags above. There was no avoiding the issue though, so we climbed directly up steep grass slopes to the remains of a quarry track, which bought us out onto a wide grassy terrace below the scree. From here we climbed leftwards (north) across the steepening slopes, between small crags and across slimy scree - not very pleasant when tethered to an excitable spaniel! The slope eased as we passed beyond the crags though, and we were able to climb the steep grass directly, emerging onto the ridge quite suddenly - quite a relief. The wind was strong though, so we took shelter behind the summit cairn to have a snack whilst admiring the extensive view.


South towards the Duddon Estuary from the steep western slopes of White Pike. Black Combe is the hill on the right.


Verdant Dunnerdale far below, with pyramid shaped Harter Fell on the right. I think that I spy the Newfield Inn far left!


The view south from the summit of White Pike.


The Scafell range covered in cloud to the north


The Dow Crag ridge covered in cloud - hills for another day

We decided that we had had enough, and that it was time to head on down - we didn't even bother to 'bag' nearby White Maiden. There didn't seem much point, to be honest, as it would be an anti-climax after our steep climb up shapely White Pike. From the saddle between White Pike and White Maiden we turned south eastwards and descended down steepening grass slopes into a shallow grassy gully.


Caw became more prominent as we descended

There is a line of crags at the bottom of the slope which required care as we were approaching from above, but I angled to the right slightly and we were able to climb down a short steep grassy gully to gain the easier ground below. A good trod angled westwards along the foot of the slopes, giving us an excellent view of the rocky southernn face of White Pike. I say 'face' as it really was quite impressive from this angle.


The impressive southern face of White Pike - the overhanging rock to the right looks like a giant grizzly bear!

We crossed a boggy stream and re-joined the bridleway, spotting some sundews in the bog nearby.


A close up of Round Leaved Sundew (Drosera rotundifolia)

The weather had improved dramatically, and we actually got quite hot as we re-traced our steps over Natty Bridge and into the forest beyond. The sun bought out the best in the flowers - Hawkweeds, Birds Foot Trefoil, Foxgloves, Tormentil, St John's Wort, Red Clover Ladies Bedstraw to name but a few - lovely. The forest smelt gorgeous in the hot sun too.


Another view of White Pike - not quite Buchaille Etive Mor, but quite impressive for such a lowly hill none the less.


Descending into the Lickle Valley, with the Duddon Estuary beyond


Approaching Natty Bridge


Natty Bridge spans quite a drop - Tess didn't like it one little bit!


Into the forest


Looking back towards White Pike - what a contrast to the dismal weather earlier in the day!


The forest track passes through some majestic larch trees - we were glad of the shade!

We stopped for our lunch on the banks of Appletree Worth Beck, just below the narrow stone footbridge. A delightful place to sit and relax - I couldn't resist taking my boots off and cooling my sweltering feet in the water.


The narrow stone bridge at Appletree Worth - a delightful spot

From here it was only a short amble of a mile back to the car, through shady woods and along quiet Hummers Lane. 7 miles or so in all.
« Last Edit: 21:46:34, 14/06/20 by richardh1905 »
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Ridge

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #1 on: 16:51:49, 14/06/20 »
Lovely pictures Richard.
We went up White Maiden last summer, though I didn't realise that is what it was called, from the other side. Decided not to press on to White Pike.
It could be the Newfield Inn but there is also the strong possibility that you are just hallucinating pubs.

richardh1905

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #2 on: 17:42:35, 14/06/20 »
Lovely pictures Richard.
We went up White Maiden last summer, though I didn't realise that is what it was called, from the other side. Decided not to press on to White Pike.

Thanks Ridge - I too have passed White Pike by in the past, and White Maiden, for that matter - they seemed like an anticlimax after going over Dow Crag, and why waste time when there is a pint waiting in the Newfield?  :) 
..but White Pike is well worth climbing in it's own right if you approach from the south, quite formidable.

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It could be the Newfield Inn but there is also the strong possibility that you are just hallucinating pubs.

Possibly - but it is my most frequented Lakeland pub. :D  Hopefully be back there in the not too far distant future - Cumberland Sausage washed down by a couple of pints, whilst sat around the giant round table opposite the bar in good company....sigh....
« Last Edit: 17:57:10, 14/06/20 by richardh1905 »
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karl h

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #3 on: 18:43:46, 14/06/20 »
Great stuff Richard O0  The weather in the lakes ( especially near the coast ) never ceases to amaze. If I had a pound for every time I've said" you wouldn't think it was the same day" I'd have lots of pounds  ;)
I've only ever come down from White Pike the once but remember it was rough
show your love for Lady Nature. And she will come back again.
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April

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #4 on: 19:49:37, 14/06/20 »
Lovely photos Richard  O0

I've never climbed or descended White Pike on that side before, only from Walna Scar. Appletree Worth Bridge does look very nice  :)

We have wild camped up on White Pike in Oct 16


The tent is a Trekkertent Drift Custom, I did like that tent a lot  :)
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #5 on: 20:20:09, 14/06/20 »
That looks a delightful walk & you had more sunshine than us down in the Midlands yesterday . Maybe Natty bridge could have been constructed a foot or two longer .  O0

richardh1905

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #6 on: 21:05:47, 14/06/20 »
Thank you for the replies Karl, April, G&P.


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If I had a pound for every time I've said" you wouldn't think it was the same day" I'd have lots of pounds
You would be a rich man indeed if you lived in Orkney!   ;)


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I've never climbed or descended White Pike on that side before, only from Walna Scar. Appletree Worth Bridge does look very nice 
It was a particularly lovely spot, April - but I suspect that the south western slopes of White Pike might get added to your banned list! ;)
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richardh1905

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #7 on: 07:32:39, 15/06/20 »
I'm already plotting a return to White Pike - there are some other routes up through the forest, and the path along the far bank of the Lickle looks tempting - and I do want to make the acquaintance of 'Grizzly Rock'. From the grassy terrace SW of the screes, I noticed a trod heading off across steep ground in that direction. Some scrambling possibilities, I suspect.


I also failed to reach Cold Tarn on Sunday - I fancy a wild swim!  :D


EDIT - I meant Blind Tarn, not Cold Tarn  :D
PS - cold beer on my mind.
« Last Edit: 20:57:31, 15/06/20 by richardh1905 »
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pdstsp

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #8 on: 09:11:57, 15/06/20 »
Cracking TR Richard - looked at those fells a couple of times but never from the South, and always turned right at the top of Walna Scar Road instead.  They look interesting fells, and I love the approach through the woods.

richardh1905

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #9 on: 14:21:30, 15/06/20 »
Cracking TR Richard - looked at those fells a couple of times but never from the South, and always turned right at the top of Walna Scar Road instead.  They look interesting fells, and I love the approach through the woods.


Thanks pdstsp - I have Karl to thank for the approach through the woods - I was blissfully unaware of this lovely corner until he posted his TR, despite knowing Dunnerdale well.


I too have always turned right down the Walna Scar Road - that way lies the Newfield Inn!  :)
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pdstsp

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #10 on: 14:28:58, 15/06/20 »
I have only been in once - early March 1991 at a guess.  We were staying with some friends who had rented a cottage in Seathwaite and we had a very very liquid evening.  The next day's walk up the Old Man was one of the worst fell experiences I have ever had.  I remember it as an exceptional pub.  Cannot wait to revisit the Lakes pubs - I miss them all!

richardh1905

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #11 on: 15:32:32, 15/06/20 »
Me too. But I shudder to think how busy they will be once they are allowed to open!
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Brandywell

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #12 on: 18:44:51, 15/06/20 »
Great stuff Richard.  O0   I've descended White Pike down to Caw Moss a few times as part of a traverse over White Maiden from Walna Scar, usually to escape the crowds on a bank holiday weekend, you get odd looks from walkers who are turning right at the top of the pass heading for Dow Crag.   On the first time, I recall it was quite a shock to be confronted by those crags after such a gentle walk along the ridge.  Then I think I descended slightly to the west of the cairn by linking up grass rakes between the crags.  On subsequent visits, not wanting to repeat that experience, I have descended well to the right towards the quarries to avoid the crags altogether.  It's a great area to explore, very quiet and full of interest with wonderful views.  Whereabouts is Cold Tarn? I thought I knew the area fairly well but I must confess I've never come across it. 
Watch where you are putting your feet : AW

richardh1905

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #13 on: 19:11:49, 15/06/20 »
Great stuff Richard.  O0   I've descended White Pike down to Caw Moss a few times as part of a traverse over White Maiden from Walna Scar, usually to escape the crowds on a bank holiday weekend, you get odd looks from walkers who are turning right at the top of the pass heading for Dow Crag.   On the first time, I recall it was quite a shock to be confronted by those crags after such a gentle walk along the ridge.  Then I think I descended slightly to the west of the cairn by linking up grass rakes between the crags.  On subsequent visits, not wanting to repeat that experience, I have descended well to the right towards the quarries to avoid the crags altogether.  It's a great area to explore, very quiet and full of interest with wonderful views.  Whereabouts is Cold Tarn? I thought I knew the area fairly well but I must confess I've never come across it.


Thanks Brandywell.


You haven't heard of Cold Tarn because it doesn't exist! I meant Blind Tarn - my bad.


We found the descent to Caw Moss from between White Pike and White Maiden - we followed a shallow grassy gully straight down the hill. There is a line of low crags near the bottom of the slope but I found a way down through them easily enough.
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April

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Re: TR - White Pike
« Reply #14 on: 19:54:15, 15/06/20 »
I suspect that the south western slopes of White Pike might get added to your banned list! ;)

Defo on the banned list in descent  ;D Looks an interesting ascent though, without wild camping gear  :)
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong