Author Topic: Ticks  (Read 1462 times)

Scrambledlegs

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #15 on: 15:57:36, 13/07/20 »
I just added a thread about tickbites in the Lake District forum after having one attach itself to me halfway up Dove Crag, I didn't realise there was already one going and just wanted to let people know to be on their guard.


Feel free to remove or add to this thread if necessary

fernman

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #16 on: 17:51:26, 31/07/20 »

richardh1905

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #17 on: 18:17:22, 31/07/20 »
First case in UK of a rare disease from ticks

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/jul/31/uk-records-first-case-of-rare-tick-borne-disease-babesiosis-tbe


My wife just bought this to my attention an hour ago  :(


I'm usually careful out on the hill, Ron Hill Tracksters with heel straps are a pretty good barrier - they stay on overnight when I am wild camping - but I did pick one up a few weeks ago, I suspect from the dog. No sign of the dreaded ring around the site of the bite, thankfully.


PS - the dog is fine - she is dosed with some powerful concoction called Bravecto, which kills ticks and fleas for 3-4 months.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

GoneWest

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #18 on: 18:30:24, 31/07/20 »
Beware of relying on the "dreaded ring". Suspect any roughly circular red mark more than about 2cm across, particularly if several appear at different times and on different parts of the body. mine were uniformly red, which is not uncommen, though the characteristic "bullseye" is probably more common.

Of course, I'm talking about Lyme Disease, here, not other nasty diseases carried by ticks. Lyme Disease is bacterial and easily cured IF caught in time. Proper diagnosis (by blood test) is a bit iffy and a good, well informed doctor will give antibiotics on a precautionary basis if you've had a fever followed by a migrating rash. There are good doctors in the UK but well informed about Lyme Disease? Not so much, even in 2020, it seems.

Tick-borne encephalitis (referred to in the Guardian's article) is rarer and much more serious. Being viral, it is also difficult to diagnose and treat successfully. There is a vaccine, though -  a fact well known to people like foresters but not by others, as far as I know. Given the huge rise in the the tick population in the UK during the last decade or so, perhaps all people spending time in the countryside should consider getting this jab. I must admit I haven't had one yet, though.
« Last Edit: 19:00:57, 31/07/20 by GoneWest »

windyrigg

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #19 on: 09:37:48, 01/08/20 »
I agree there are still Doctors out there who aren't really tick aware. If you have an issue dont allow them to fob you off.
I've worked in the outdoors most of my life and in the UK have certainly noticed a link between bracken and ticks (ticks obviously occur on other stuff as well). we have more bracken now. Very little is cut for animal bedding (which tends to reduce it) and grant aid to encourage farmers to control bracken has largely dried up. In a post EU Agricultural Policy UK, financial support for bracken control would make a difference

fernman

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #20 on: 12:08:51, 01/08/20 »
The postman has just delivered a letter CC'd to me that was circulated to a group of doctors at my local hospital, which is currently the one that is treating me post cancer surgerey.
The letter is full of medical jargon and abbreviations 98% of which are largely meaningless to me.
Long story short, I was due to start a course of chemotherapy tablets which can affect the way in which the heart works or even cause heart failure or heart attack, but tests have now shown that my heart has an abnormality with its natural pacemaker.

So why am I writing this? Well, on looking up information on the problem, one of the causes of it really stood out to me, and that is Lyme disease. I've had tick bites quite a few times over the years when wild camping in Snowdonia, the first being in 2004, and though I've never been aware of any symptoms, it has got me wondering if there could be a connection.

Jac

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Re: Ticks
« Reply #21 on: 12:37:06, 01/08/20 »
The postman has just delivered a letter CC'd to me that was circulated to a group of doctors at my local hospital, which is currently the one that is treating me post cancer surgerey.
The letter is full of medical jargon and abbreviations 98% of which are largely meaningless to me.
Long story short, I was due to start a course of chemotherapy tablets which can affect the way in which the heart works or even cause heart failure or heart attack, but tests have now shown that my heart has an abnormality with its natural pacemaker.

So why am I writing this? Well, on looking up information on the problem, one of the causes of it really stood out to me, and that is Lyme disease. I've had tick bites quite a few times over the years when wild camping in Snowdonia, the first being in 2004, and though I've never been aware of any symptoms, it has got me wondering if there could be a connection.

I am so sorry to hear that your problems have become more complex and really hope that things start to look up for you.

For my part I seem to be a tick magnet and have been for many years.  6 in one day is, I think, the record whilst my partner seldom gets one. Wearing shorts or long trousers seems to make no difference. The site of a bite itches and reddens but a classic bulls-eye rash has never appeared. However, I have been diagnosed with a mild heart rhythm abnormality - no obvious reason and not severe enough to require medication so now I too am wondering.
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