Author Topic: British Definition of the Metre Amended.  (Read 2546 times)

myxpyr

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Re: British Definition of the Metre Amended.
« Reply #15 on: 16:49:41, 19/06/20 »
 ???

Mel

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Re: British Definition of the Metre Amended.
« Reply #16 on: 17:07:59, 19/06/20 »
......- the faster you walk, the heavier you get.   O0
 


Does that theory work in reverse?  :D



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ninthace

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Re: British Definition of the Metre Amended.
« Reply #17 on: 18:24:59, 19/06/20 »

Does that theory work in reverse?  :D
In theory yes - if you can come to a dead stop relative to the universe, but you had better be good at holding your breath as you would  have to leave the earth behind  ;)   
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Cooksbridge Monkey

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Re: British Definition of the Metre Amended.
« Reply #18 on: 18:34:10, 19/06/20 »
In theory yes - if you can come to a dead stop relative to the universe, but you had better be good at holding your breath as you would  have to leave the earth behind  ;)
Here's something to try next time you're in a lift. Before it starts going down bend your knees slightly. Then, as soon as it starts going down, straighten your knees suddenly. For a micro second you should be weightless O0

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: British Definition of the Metre Amended.
« Reply #19 on: 20:10:39, 19/06/20 »
Here's something to try next time you're in a lift. Before it starts going down bend your knees slightly. Then, as soon as it starts going down, straighten your knees suddenly. For a micro second you should be weightless O0
.. but you would still have the same mass.

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: British Definition of the Metre Amended.
« Reply #20 on: 20:13:11, 19/06/20 »
Depends on if you can walk fast enough - the faster you walk, the heavier you get.   O0

 




Not only do you get heavier, but your length also decreases. Does this mean that faster walkers are denser than slower walkers?  :)  PS how did you get the formula to appear? I canít get the equivalent for length to show.

ninthace

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Re: British Definition of the Metre Amended.
« Reply #21 on: 20:52:33, 19/06/20 »
Not only do you get heavier, but your length also decreases. Does this mean that faster walkers are denser than slower walkers?  :)  PS how did you get the formula to appear? I canít get the equivalent for length to show.
You mean?
{\displaystyle L=L_{0}{\sqrt {1-v^{2}/c^{2}}}}
We know a poem about that don't we boys and girls?


There was a young man called Fisk
Whose fencing was exceedingly brisk
So fast was his action
The Lorentz contraction
Reduced his rapier to a disk


(With apologies to Fitzgerald)
P.S.  You can work wonders moving equations around if you copy them as images Mike
Solvitur Ambulando