Author Topic: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors  (Read 1378 times)

harland

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #30 on: 12:56:41, 29/06/20 »
Perhaps they should close the beaches with a sign there and on the main road into the town:
"Sorry the beach is closed today due to the amount of litter left by the inconsiderate visitors yesterday - your visit is important to us - Please try later!"

barewirewalker

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #31 on: 13:30:04, 29/06/20 »
My vote's for Stocks thenwe can all pick up litter throw it an the perps and make big pile. ;D

Oh I really don't like going to the places they seem to like litter so I won't be there :'(
BWW
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andybr

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #32 on: 14:08:52, 29/06/20 »
Perhaps they should close the beaches with a sign there and on the main road into the town:
"Sorry the beach is closed today due to the amount of litter left by the inconsiderate visitors yesterday - your visit is important to us - Please try later!"


Sadly in the case of popular beaches this understates the problem. Aside from the fact that the beach will be washed clean(er) twice a day by the tide it is also likely to be cleaned by the local authority every morning unless the tide prevents it. This is done with a mechanised rake. The awful fact is that the piles of litter you see are the result of just a few hours of use by inconsiderate visitors.

SteamyTea

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #33 on: 14:37:22, 29/06/20 »
It is worth looking back to the 1970's to see how bad littering can get.

I don't use emojis, irony is better, you decide

gunwharfman

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #34 on: 14:45:31, 29/06/20 »
There are other ways to look at this 'litter' problem. Maybe for some people, it's a very easy way for them, and possibly fulfills a need as well, either as individuals or as part of a group, to 'dump their own personal anger, poor self-worth, envy, whatever negativity it may be etc' onto others.? We are all different so who knows what really motivates us to moan and groan about so many people who are deemed to have one major fault, they are not like me! People who litter for example could be seen as just another group to have a go at, single mothers, gay people, people who are the wrong colour, the wrong religion, the wrong nationality, the wrong sort of disability, the elderly, the lefties, the righties, the people in the middle,..blah...blah .......blah...........in reality, the list is endless! All of these 'bad' people, as individuals or groups might see and judge them, all there own 'negative fan clubs' who once their 'members' are 'poked and prodded' by a photo, a story or something else, they just want to GO for them! Newspapers do this very well, they take a side and it sells to the people that want to read such stuff.

All I'm saying is that no moaning will solve the problem in any way BUT it might be good for our individual poor self-image and whatever else makes us feel better about ourselves. All that I know is, I don't know the answer!

tonyk

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #35 on: 16:21:10, 29/06/20 »
Perhaps they should close the beaches with a sign there and on the main road into the town:
"Sorry the beach is closed today due to the amount of litter left by the inconsiderate visitors yesterday - your visit is important to us - Please try later!"

Or................."The beach is closed until it is cleaned. If you want to use it you will have to volunteer to clear up the mess left by yesterday's visitors and then we will re-open it for public use.This is due to us no longer having the resources to employ cleaning teams on a daily basis."

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #36 on: 18:00:43, 29/06/20 »
We can teach character, responsibility and good attitude to youngsters and this may result in good behaviour. By the time they have got to dumping 33 tons of litter on Bournemouth beach or despoiling the Lakes with portable barbecues, bottles and the like, I fear it is too late.


GWM there is a big difference in criticising people because of their behaviour than discriminating due to race, etc.

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #37 on: 18:32:24, 29/06/20 »
Its not just barbecues in Scotland. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-53219351


Given the location of the Balmoral estate, I find it hard to believe that this was perpetrated by locals, who have travelled within the 5 mile limit allowed for exercise up here.

richardh1905

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #38 on: 18:58:24, 29/06/20 »
Wipes are the work of the devil - at least toilet paper degrades quickly.

SteamyTea

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #39 on: 10:00:58, 30/06/20 »
Wipes are the work of the devil - at least toilet paper degrades quickly.
Sometimes during usage.
I don't use emojis, irony is better, you decide

Davidedgarjones

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #40 on: 15:35:27, 01/07/20 »
Well, we can all agree that litter and barbecues are a problem, and perhaps a good rant by us oldies about the youth of today is good for our mental health. Personally. at the age of 74, I try to avoid coming over as a crusty old git.


However, the point of my post was to enquire what action you personally might take when you observe some sort of transgression taking place.


Dave

tonyk

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #41 on: 16:11:21, 01/07/20 »


However, the point of my post was to enquire what action you personally might take when you observe some sort of transgression taking place.


Dave
Getting back to your original question I would take no action at all.Even kids as young as ten carry knives these days and if its two against one they can do you some serious damage or worse.The idea of a walk is to go home at the end of it instead of ending up in a hospital bed or undertakers.A friend used to work as a teacher in a pupil referral unit and I know the problems he has had restraining young kids who are intent on causing trouble and he is a former bouncer and 5th dan Black Belt in karate.

 Phoning the police is a waste of time as they haven't got the resources to investigate littering these days.Its the reason councils employ litter wardens and street marshalls.

Mel

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #42 on: 18:03:00, 01/07/20 »
I don't think I'd speak to anyone having a BBQ or party.  After all, there are still some people who will go and do these things and clean up after themselves.  Aye, at the moment BBQs are not permitted in most NPs due to the high fire risk so anyone doing so now before the covid restrictions are lifted is either being willfully irresponsible or innocently naive.


If they seemed like the willfully irresponsible sort then I would say report it to the Police via the non-emergency number/website and also inform the relevant NPA.  I don't doubt that anything would be done about the specific incident but the information sits on their records as a data gathering reference which, if enough people reported similar incidents in the same place, could be acted upon either with higher police / drone presence or park rangers patrolling the area.


As an aside, I did read a news article about local shop owners and supermarkets being asked not to stock/sell portable BBQs due to the increased risk of moorland fires so there is "stuff" going on in the background.

I'm tired of people bein' ugly to each other. It feels like pieces of glass in my head. - John Coffey, The Green Mile

strawy

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #43 on: 19:53:30, 01/07/20 »
"When the flame seems dead"
"But the embers still flicker"
"Leave your barbie just there"
"Then post it on twitter"




barewirewalker

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Re: Barbecue parties in the great outdoors
« Reply #44 on: Yesterday at 10:30:30 »
However, the point of my post was to enquire what action you personally might take when you observe some sort of transgression taking place.


Dave
The answer is quite simple and has sitting under the noses of the CLA and NFU for decades. Ever since the majority of the Great British Public started carrying mobile phones.
Had landowners recognised the good image the identity of the British Farmer has earned, rather than trying to exclude all from the countryside, a policy of acceptance, recognition that the majority of the GBP are law abiding and abhor this sort of behaviour, they might have realised that incorporating visitors into the countryside watch scheme might have been the answer, before bad behaviour it got out of hand.
The simple use of QR codes alongside waymarks linking landowners, visitor and authority into an existing framework would enlarge the automatic evidence collecting base, without direct involvement.
Quote
A QR code (abbreviated from Quick Response code) is a type of matrix barcode (or two-dimensional barcode) first designed in 1994 for the automotive industry in Japan.
If some can read a QR code they have the equipment to photograph evidence, people and cars, this is then channeled automatically to the interested party, who would then notify the police when sufficient evidence is collected.


It would also be the means of created diversions around stock, giving additional safe ways at the same time as the landowner being able to have an electronic contract of good behaviour between himself and the visitor during the time that person was on his land. If such practices were in practice it could be used to reduce third party insurance risk.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 10:33:31 by barewirewalker »
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.