Author Topic: Wild Camping  (Read 1822 times)

daniel22

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Wild Camping
« on: 23:02:51, 01/07/20 »
Hi everyone,
A friend and I are hoping to do a walk over a couple of days and camp out. I was googling wild camping and I saw it said there arenít many places in the UK you are allowed to wild camp? Is this the case?


Weíd be looking in the north east, around Durham kind of way. Preferably somewhere foresty - I like being under the tress :) And where I wouldnít hear cars or other modern civilisation-type noise. Does anyone have any suggestions? Iíd appreciate any recommendations!


In terms of the walk, I was thinking nothing majorly strenuous since Iím relatively new at this. Maybe 10 miles a day to make it 20 miles total?


Thanks all :)
Daniel

gunwharfman

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #1 on: 13:30:36, 02/07/20 »
When I hike and if I'm in the wrong place at the end of the day, if I have to wild camp I will do it, law or no law. My favoured way of doing it is to be discrete, I like to have something at my back like a rock, or a fence if in a field, (I prefer empty fields) and do tend to look at the right-angled corners of fields if that choice exists. I've sometimes camped in the angle between a wall or fence if an open five bar gate has been jammed open and it's obvious that it's never closed. I'm also partial to sleeping on wooden footbridges in bad weather, (did this twice on the Two Moors Way) and on odd bits of farm equipment, flatbed trailers are pretty good. I'm not a wood camping fan, neither am I a river bank camper. I made the mistake of doing this once (at Alston) and in the morning I was overwhelmed with millions of biting little flies!

daniel22

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #2 on: 13:35:57, 02/07/20 »
Thanks gunwharfman...some tips there I'd not have considered! I will stay away from the water, the midgies usually swarm me at the best of times haha.

vghikers

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #3 on: 14:59:37, 02/07/20 »
Quote
...it said there arenít many places in the UK you are allowed to wild camp? Is this the case?

Yes, but in practice it's not really the right question. You need to be aware of the legal position just in case of course, but...
Very briefly, in mountainous or remote areas it's no problem at all, in other areas you need to be a bit more careful. In all cases leave no trace of your presence.

Take a look at the many backpacks on our site, most are in high remote territory but we have also wild camped low level routes as well, even trails like the Ridgeway in the south.
There is plenty of wild country up there in the north-east, we had some good nights there.


daniel22

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #4 on: 21:00:39, 02/07/20 »
Thanks vghikers. So Iím assuming when you are on someone land, like farmland, best not to set up. I was hoping to be very remote.

Definitely leave no trace. Why do people dump their rubbish everywhere?!??

richardh1905

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #5 on: 21:28:33, 02/07/20 »
Hi Daniel - Hamsterley Forest is not that far west of Durham, but is not really big enough to accommodate a 20 mile walk.

I would look northwards - if you are determined to be in amongst the trees then surely Kielder beckons - miles upon miles of easy forest roads , trees by the million and I'm sure plenty of decent hidden places to camp. Midges might be a problem, though, and the Forestry Commission might take a dim view.

Better in my opinion would be to head towards the Cheviot, I'm sure that you could string a good route together there, and away from the Pennine Way and The Cheviot itself, it is likely to be very quiet. I've not walked there myself (on my 'to do in the near future' list, but the country to the south looks particularly interesting, some steep convoluted river valleys dissecting the uplands.

Finally, on the subject of wild camping:

Arrive late,
Leave early,
Be discreet,
Leave nothing


PS - just over the border in Scotland it is legal to wild camp (in non Covid times, that is)
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richardh1905

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #6 on: 21:43:24, 02/07/20 »
Also, Harwood Forest and the Simonside hills SW of Rothbury.


April wrote a trip report - https://www.walkingforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=39948.0
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

daniel22

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #7 on: 21:49:58, 02/07/20 »
Thanks Richard, Kielder certainly looks appealing! Couple of hours drive but would be worth it!

ninthace

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #8 on: 22:46:28, 02/07/20 »
Hi Daniel - Hamsterley Forest is not that far west of Durham, but is not really big enough to accommodate a 20 mile walk.

I would look northwards - if you are determined to be in amongst the trees then surely Kielder beckons - miles upon miles of easy forest roads , trees by the million and I'm sure plenty of decent hidden places to camp. Midges might be a problem, though, and the Forestry Commission might take a dim view.

Better in my opinion would be to head towards the Cheviot, I'm sure that you could string a good route together there, and away from the Pennine Way and The Cheviot itself, it is likely to be very quiet. I've not walked there myself (on my 'to do in the near future' list, but the country to the south looks particularly interesting, some steep convoluted river valleys dissecting the uplands.

Finally, on the subject of wild camping:

Arrive late,
Leave early,
Be discreet,
Leave nothing


PS - just over the border in Scotland it is legal to wild camp (in non Covid times, that is)
Actually Hamsterley Forest and the moors nearby can accommodate a 20 mile walk.  Here is one based on sections 3 or 4 walks I have done knitted together.  There is a little bit of road work and the short section of footpath from NY 98237 31329 (Candlesieve Sike) and NY 97652 30925 (Wire Gill) is a figment of the map makers imagination, but the footpath marked just to S passing by spot ht 497 might exist as an alternative.  Great Eggles Hope would be a good place for a wild camp - there are even some buildings for a lee.
https://osmaps.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/route/5400861/Hamsterley-Forest-20-mile-loop
Solvitur Ambulando

richardh1905

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #9 on: 07:17:13, 03/07/20 »
You obviously know the area better than I, ninthace. :)
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WILDWALKINGUK

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #10 on: 08:04:55, 03/07/20 »
Wild camping definitely gives you more freedom, as you are not aiming for accommodation each night. It has to be done with respect and be as discreet as possible though. Leave absolutely no trace, camp late and leave early, absolutely no camp fire or noise, and you should be OK. You might want to have a look at my 11 wild camping rules: https://wildwalkinguk.com/2019/06/18/my-11-wild-camping-rules/

daniel22

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #11 on: 00:24:07, 04/07/20 »
Thanks wildwalkinguk :) i will take a look now!


RockPenguin

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #13 on: 21:46:48, 06/07/20 »
Hi all. I'm hoping to do a high camp near Pillar in the lakes followed by a few tops around Great Gable the following day. Does anyone know of a layby on or near the Honister Pass that I can start out from? Or a car park offering overnight parking?


I havent hiked/wild camped much in the lakes to be honest, my usual over-nighters tend to be in  Wales and the NW Highlands.

karl h

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Re: Wild Camping
« Reply #14 on: 22:32:30, 06/07/20 »
Hi all. I'm hoping to do a high camp near Pillar in the lakes followed by a few tops around Great Gable the following day. Does anyone know of a layby on or near the Honister Pass that I can start out from? Or a car park offering overnight parking?


I havent hiked/wild camped much in the lakes to be honest, my usual over-nighters tend to be in  Wales and the NW Highlands.


I'm not 100% sure but I dont think you can park overnight at the slate mine or the Youth hostel but you could ring to check. There is a small parking area just down the road on the Borrowdale side.



It's not much of a walk back up the hill to the top of the pass.
Hope you have a great time  O0
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