Author Topic: You know you’re a WALKER when…  (Read 2057 times)

WhitstableDave

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You know you’re a WALKER when…
« on: 15:24:03, 10/07/20 »
I’ve become a fan of The Running Channel on YouTube and I liked a video they posted called: 'You know you’re a RUNNER when…' because I thought that most of the things they came up with would apply equally to walkers. They applied to me, anyway!
 
So I’ve shamelessly borrowed their idea and tweaked it just a little. Here are 5 things that are extremely familiar to me; perhaps you might like to suggest some of your own…
 
You know you’re a WALKER when…
 
1. You can’t end a walk at 9.8 miles; it has to be 10.
 
Okay, 10 miles is just an example – any whole number will do. You're almost finished and can see that your final distance will be just short of a neat round number. So you take a short diversion, or walk around the car park, or go a little way past your house and back again – until you reach the magic figure.
 
2. You have a drawer dedicated solely to walking gear.
 
I’ve got a large drawer dedicated solely to walking socks. 'Nuff said!
 
3. You can convert a range of distances without a calculator.
 
Without being too precise: I prefer to work in miles, but when I hear 'half-marathon' or '10K' or '5 miles' I can switch between units with ease.
 
4. Sunday mornings are earlier than Monday mornings.
 
There was a time when I got up late at weekends. Then we went walking on Saturdays and I got up late on Sundays. Then we started walking on Sundays too and I didn't mind getting up early in the slightest. But perhaps that's mainly to do with getting old!
 
5. You know exactly where a mile from home is in every direction.
 
I do! And two, three and four miles in every direction as well. For example, on my favourite route going south: One mile: halfway up a bridge; two miles: an oak tree; three miles: a cow shed; four miles: a signpost. And, of course, knowing the distance remaining means that I also know exactly what time I'll be home as well.

ninthace

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #1 on: 15:42:08, 10/07/20 »
Not sure I qualify,

1.  You can’t end a walk at 9.8 miles; it has to be 10   My walks are as long as they are.  I like it when they end up being as long as I said they would be though, proves I got the planning right.
2.  You have a drawer dedicated solely to walking gear   I only have a carrier bag full of socks in the wardrobe and one dedicated drawer for "stuff"
3.  You can convert a range of distances without a calculator  I can convert distances between systems no problem but I work entirely in km.  Bet you can't convert nm to km though! (I learned flying metric aircraft)
4.  Sunday mornings are earlier than Monday mornings  Sunday Mornings are for a lie in - that is when the common herd are out trampling all over the place.  I prefer week days when i can have the place to myself.
5.  You know exactly where a mile from home is in every direction  That I can do but  in km and I can tell you how long a walk will take to within 10 mins once I have planned it
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Warbler

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #2 on: 15:55:39, 10/07/20 »
I certainly don't qualify then.

The only point I can relate to in any degree is No3.

Maybe No5 too, at one mile, and in one direction only. And that's only because my local is exactly one mile away  :o

daniel22

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #3 on: 16:15:49, 10/07/20 »
Point number 1 struck home. I walked to and from the supermarket last night and when I checked my app it came to 4.95 miles 😱😳😳

Ridge

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #4 on: 16:21:39, 10/07/20 »
1 No, I wonder if that is more a running thing
2 Yes, I also have a walking socks drawer.
3 Yes roughly, but for me to understand how far it is it has to be in miles.
4 No, though walking days are earlier than furloughed days at the moment.
5 No, I do know how far certain points are from home but they are not all a mile.


2/5 failed

richardh1905

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #5 on: 17:10:11, 10/07/20 »
Good thread subject. O0

For me it is more about the sense of adventure and achievement of getting into wild places, rather than distance covered  - a mile on the hill can be as tough as 2 or in some cases 3 on the flat. Taking over an hour to walk the mile and a bit from Kentmere Pike to Harter Fell in full on winter conditions earlier this year springs to mind - utterly exhausting but intensely satisfying. A taste of winter on the fells - VIDEO

I qualify on 2 (we have a cupboard full of sleeping bags and mats), and 3 (just because I can do mental arithmetic easily - I'm the same with pounds and kilograms for cooking) but although I record mileages, I'm really not that bothered whether a walk is 9.8 or 10 miles, or 5 or 5.2 miles, I just round it to the nearest mile, and sometimes I just guestimate.


My list:

1: when you start thinking about possible new routes whilst lying in bed at night
2: when you have a cupboard full of walking gear, and it spills over into the garage (same as Dave's 2).
3: when your partner starts grumbling about the amount of gear that you have - "Do you really need that 4th tent/rucksack/whatever?"
4: when holidays have to have a walking related element to them.
5: when you squeeze in a walk on business trips or family visits.
« Last Edit: 17:42:27, 10/07/20 by richardh1905 »
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WhitstableDave

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #6 on: 17:18:02, 10/07/20 »

My list: (ie Richard's)

1: when you start thinking about possible new routes whilst lying in bed at night
2: when you have a cupboard full of walking gear, and it spills over into the garage (same as Dave's 2).
3: when your partner starts grumbling about the amount of gear that you have - "Do you really need that 4th tent/rucksack/whatever?"
4: when holidays have to have a walking related element to them.
5: when you squeeze in a walk on business trips or family visits.

#1 and #4 definitely apply to me. #3 doesn't, because my wife has far more outdoor/exercise gear than me!  ;)

p.s. My #1 wasn't about distance covered, but about getting to a significant point. For example, if you arrive back at your car/house with 19.9 miles on your watch/device, do you walk around a bit to get it to 20 miles? I certainly do!
« Last Edit: 17:23:38, 10/07/20 by WhitstableDave »

ninthace

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #7 on: 17:25:27, 10/07/20 »
Re Richard's No 5 - Mrs N had to have a Covid test in Exeter last Sunday so we planned and did a walk over Woodbury Common and the nearby nature reserve so as not to waste a trip - is that the sort of thing you mean  :)
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ninthace

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #8 on: 17:35:30, 10/07/20 »
Re Richards list
1.  Yes and I often have the OS mapping site open on the laptop while supposedly watching TV
2.  No - there is a cupboard and a drawer and it all fits.  The only excess gear I own is a second pair of boots for when the other pair are away for repair.
3.  No - I have trained the family that walking gear and clothing are acceptable presents so they cannot complain about their own gifts (Machiavellian - moi?)
4.  We take walking holidays - it is just a question of training one's partner.
5.  See previous post.  Even our trip to NZ for my son's wedding included the Tongariro crossing.
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watershed

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #9 on: 17:37:32, 10/07/20 »
I can relate to these. I thought it was because I was a runner in a previous Century.
But I can relate more to what Richard lists now.
You probably should have been a runner Dave. Maybe  now you are starting what will become your main passion.
My biggest difference was with number (1). I would always measure, using your example, to run 10.2 or 10.3 miles to be extra sure I had done at least the distance.
I would also underestimate the speed I had run at.
That way I would have no bad surprises come race day.




« Last Edit: 17:57:43, 10/07/20 by watershed »

richardh1905

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #10 on: 17:40:20, 10/07/20 »
Re Richard's No 5 - Mrs N had to have a Covid test in Exeter last Sunday so we planned and did a walk over Woodbury Common and the nearby nature reserve so as not to waste a trip - is that the sort of thing you mean  :)


That is exactly the sort of thing I mean. Such tactics were particularly important to me when I lived in Orkney, due to the expense and inconvenience of getting off the island - I would try to snatch a night in the Cairngorms or the Lakes when I headed south on my own on family matters. And I was lucky enough to have Shetland and the Western Isles on my patch whilst working in Orkney, and Arthur's Seat has been climbed many a time whilst visiting head office in Edinburgh. Even a training course in Dunfermline was not wasted, as Lomond West was within easy reach.
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Ridge

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #11 on: 17:47:31, 10/07/20 »
Richard's list:
1: when you start thinking about possible new routes whilst lying in bed at night yes, and the lap top usually has a map open
2: when you have a cupboard full of walking gear, and it spills over into the garage (same as Dave's 2). different place but yes
3: when your partner starts grumbling about the amount of gear that you have - "Do you really need that 4th tent/rucksack/whatever?"No, I am probably harder on myself about not buying new stuff than she is.
4: when holidays have to have a walking related element to them. yes
5: when you squeeze in a walk on business trips or family visits. yes


watershed

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #12 on: 17:51:20, 10/07/20 »
If running does become your passion Dave remember it is never to late to start.
I am in the middle of writing a letter to my good friend Priscilla Welch, who wrote to me from America earlier this week.
She started jogging in 1978 at 34 years old having been a heavy smoker. She ran for Shetland when she stayed here in the early eighties and was the Shetland and Orkney X Country Ladies Champion.
She came 6th in the Los Angeles Olympics at the Marathon in a British record of 2hours 28:54. her second British record was a 2nd place in London in 2Hrs 26:51 and it stood as a world Masters record for over 20 years. She also became the first Brit to win the New York Marathon.
So as you are an older x smoker Dave we will be watching how you progress
« Last Edit: 18:04:59, 10/07/20 by watershed »

richardh1905

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #13 on: 17:54:15, 10/07/20 »
p.s. My #1 wasn't about distance covered, but about getting to a significant point. For example, if you arrive back at your car/house with 19.9 miles on your watch/device, do you walk around a bit to get it to 20 miles? I certainly do!


The thought would never enter my head, to be honest.
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richardh1905

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Re: You know you’re a WALKER when…
« Reply #14 on: 17:56:49, 10/07/20 »
If running does become your passion Dave remember it is never to late to start.


So true.
From the last Kirkwall Parkrun (March)

32 Alfred SHACKLADY Male VM85-89 Orkney Running Club 45:00




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