Author Topic: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination  (Read 1225 times)

watershed

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 236
Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« on: 13:32:17, 16/07/20 »
Latest news.


Ofgem have approved the Interconnector to Shetland 3 minutes ago.


We are now officially going to become a windfarm.


Please if you are thinking to do a walking holiday here, get in touch before you pay and I will update.
Certainly won''t be worth it after 2024.


But enough damage may be done before that so do your home work before paying as it is expensive to come here.

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5486
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #1 on: 14:27:03, 16/07/20 »
Sad news - Goodbye Shetland between Lerwick and Brae, then - one giant windfarm on the Lang Kames, a giant blot on the landscape visible for miles.  :(

Just don't see the point now that offshore wind is becoming more viable.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

watershed

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 236
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #2 on: 15:03:31, 16/07/20 »
Thanks Richard.


There are other applications for Wind farms in Yell and Sandness, the Viking farm 102 wind mills at 155m each is just the foot in the door.


I recently finished walking all the 120 plus hills in Shetland that have summits above 150M.
There will be more windmills above that height come the mid 2020's.
All to be built on peat and blanket bog. the best estimate for Carbon payback is 10-15 years, but when roads, quarries and cable taken into consideration some estimates are as high as 48 years.
Corruption rife here I am afraid!


Sadly Clearances appear to be back in fashion here in Shetland.

Construction costs will be somewhere over 1.3 Billion.


Devastating news
« Last Edit: 15:09:07, 16/07/20 by watershed »

Dyffryn Ardudwy

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1817
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #3 on: 18:06:35, 23/07/20 »
I wasn't that impressed with Shetland, when i visited last year.

The only real highlight was driving around the most northerly roundabout in the British Isles, and standing outside the Sheriffs Court in Lerwick, which is used in the Shetland series.

I much prefer Orkney, far more to see and do, with so much archaeology and history.

Shetland was on my tick list of places to visit.

Ive ticked it off, and really there was no excitement to return.


As for wind farms, well Wales has its fair share of those, and their green credentials are a bit hit and miss.


Their energy supply is not constant, and the only people making money from them, are the companies who are receiving huge Government grants to place them in areas of incredible beauty, with miniscule populations.


How convenient, and strange, that the beauty of Cumbria and the Lakes are not being despoiled by these useless turbines.


I have no issues with how they look, as i rather like the look of them, but its locating them in areas of outstanding beauty, and their wind and energy generating potential is poor, related to their installation cost.


If the wind is too high, they cannot operate, and if the wind is too low, they will not turn efficiently.




Going GREEN is one thing, but at least design alternative energy sources that provide energy 24/7, not when weather conditions allow.
« Last Edit: 18:17:10, 23/07/20 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5486
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #4 on: 09:13:34, 24/07/20 »
You are of course entitled to your opinion, DA, but I don't think that our post is fair on Shetland - it depends upon what you want from your visit - your focus is obviously archaeology.

As someone who has lived on Orkney for 17 years, and who has visited Shetland over 100 times (not an exaggeration), I have to say that, on the whole, Shetland has a much 'wilder' feel to it - a lot of Orkney is heavily cultivated. The only really wild country in Orkney is on Hoy - and wild it is too!

..and the fish and chips in Shetland are better ;)
« Last Edit: 09:17:52, 24/07/20 by richardh1905 »
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5486
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #5 on: 09:24:49, 24/07/20 »
As for wind turbines, there is no doubt that turbines in windy locations such as Orkney and Shetland operate much more efficiently than say in Lincolnshire. The wind has to be very strong indeed for the turbines to shut down.


The problem with the Shetland proposals, in my humble opinion, are twofold - firstly they will completely dominate a large part of the island, secondly, the turbines and access roads will be built upon fragile peat moorland, disrupting the drainage of what is a carbon sink.


As for the intermittent nature of wind power, the answer is energy storage. The National Grid does have modest storage capability (Pumped storage schemes such as Dinorwic and Cruachan, and some VERY large batteries), but wind is only part of the power generation mix, and the generation of hydrogen using the excess energy offers huge potential for energy storage. Also, many homes in the Highlands and Islands still use storage heaters, offering further storage potential during the coldest (windiest) part of the year, with appropriate smart metering and control.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

watershed

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 236
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #6 on: 08:08:26, 25/07/20 »
No I'm sorry but its certainly not an improvement!'



watershed

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 236
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #7 on: 08:10:01, 25/07/20 »

Dyffryn Ardudwy

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1817
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #8 on: 12:06:54, 25/07/20 »
Shetland is certainly wild and very bleak and Barron, but for someone visiting for the first time, looking for things to do, and places to explore, it was a bit of a disappointment.

You had to do your homework before visiting, otherwise, you could drive around for ages looking for something to see.

It was not a disappointment, as i half expected it to be a bit sparse on visitor excitement, but visitor attractions were few, and there was no excitement driving round the bleak moorland.

It was more like the Isle of Harris, but with less to do.

The islands are so very different, but for someone looking for things to see and do, Orkney wins every time.


Ive visited Orkney, four times, and i am still gagging to return.


Ive still not seen most of the highlights, as there are simply too many to list, and there"s a visitor excitement about driving around the place, so much history.


For a total stranger, Orkney has that mystical magnetism, a place that once youve visited, you must come back ASAP, very much like the Isle of Barra in the Outer Hebrides, i am desperate to return there, LOVED IT TO BITS

I am a history and archaeology buff, and combining that interest with a MEGA walk, STUFF OF DREAM, and Orkney has so much to offer, whilst Shetland was worth visiting, but i am not desperate to return.
« Last Edit: 12:15:39, 25/07/20 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

watershed

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 236
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #9 on: 13:09:34, 25/07/20 »
I was disappointed for you after reading your first letter as you obviously hadn't enjoyed the visit.
Your second letter makes it clearer to me why.
I see that you had hoped to have all the sites sign posted for you.
I have known Orkney well, since I first visited in the 70's.
Even then I noted that Orkney was better geared up for the tourist visitor, with extensive signage. It didn't feel much different from visiting South on the British Mainland. It is really rather hard not to find all that Orkney has to offer.
including all of their 50 plus Brochs.
Shetland on the other hand thankfully, doesn't signpost much, which could be frustrating to the casual visitor. Only 3 or four of 80 plus Brochs here are sign posted, the rest need to searched for.
I have visited them all including the most recently discovered one. You have to earn them here I'm afraid and I can see that could put of the more casual/less able visitor, but for me that is part of the attraction.
The centre of the North Mainland does contain Moorland which when driving through can appear bleak. But once you get out and explore is found to be a Haven of wildlife, my favourite sightings is the Golden Plover, White hares in winter, the Red Throated Divers and the Snowy Owls. But you do have to get out of your car and explore.
The coast is second to none and the Otters, Orcas and Seals a delight to see. There are no sign posts for this, but just walking a few miles along the coast will present these delights to you.

« Last Edit: 13:13:59, 25/07/20 by watershed »

Dyffryn Ardudwy

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1817
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #10 on: 13:50:05, 25/07/20 »
No, i certainly did not expect tourist signs with the friendly pointers saying THIS WAY TO THE TOURIST HOTSPOTS.

Obviously Shetland is more in tune with its closer proximity to Denmark and Sweden.

Visited Iceland donkey's years ago, and there was not much going on there, the Blue Lagoon, and that was about it.

Shetland was a bit too bleak and lacking in visitor highlights, you had to make up your own entertainment there, and HEAVEN forbid if you took the family there, expecting an action packed adventure.

Daddy, can we go to the beach, or funfair, sorry LUV we are on Shetland, the isles of Norse sagas, Noggin the Nog and Odin, just conjour up the imagination of a Viking longboat setting sail from that cove, there yonder.

Shetland was Ok, i saw the highlights, but unless you had really done your homework before getting off the ferry, it was lacking in things to do, places of real excitement.

Spending a fortnight there, you might struggle to get the history juices flowing.

Orkney on the other hand, its the only place i made a special return trip, to get a tourist momento, that no matter how hard i tried i could not get on the internet.


The object of my desires, was the tiny Orkney Angel, the small stone carved figure of a bucksome well endowed women, unearthed at the Ness of Brogar.

Its recognised as one of the earliest known figures of a human, to have come from the British Isles, and i wanted one.

I saw one for sale in the gift shop at Skara Brae, the first time i visited the island, and was desperately annoyed i didn't buy one.

Several emails to Scottish Tourism, and a polite and long winded phone call to the Skara Brae visitor centre, only to be told, they didn't have them in stock, and didn't know if they would be getting anymore.

A journey of 658 miles was undertaken, and it was the first thing i looked for on arrival at the shop, and 5 came out of my pocket.

It now sits pride of place on my mantlepiece at home.

Nobody has asked me What is That, but Orkney was special enough to warrant a return trip of 658miles just to get hold of a piece of carved resin.

If your not into archaeology or history, you simply would not care, but i promised myself, i will return to this amazing island

It was to be expected i suppose, but once you ticked Jarlshof off the list, you were struggling to find other exciting things to do on Shetland.


Running around the most northerly roundabout in Britain, when there was no traffic coming, was fun, and taking a selfie of me outside the doorway at the Sheriffs office in Lerwick, cos i am a fan of the Shetland series (HOPE THEY MAKE MORE).


Those were the main highlights, otherwise, Shetland was just another thing to tick off my bucket list.


No doubt, i will be corrected, and have the virtues of Shetland pointed out to my untrained eye, but it was a very lengthy ferry trip, that was worthwhile, just to say ive been there.


I am not the kind of person who lives the life of partying and burning the midnight oil, but i found the Outer Hebrides more action packed than Shetland.


Benbecula was on par with Shetland, a long way there, and not an awful amount to do on your arrival.


Ah give me Orkney any day of the week.
« Last Edit: 14:00:49, 25/07/20 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

Jac

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2560
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #11 on: 14:29:30, 25/07/20 »
...and breath
So many paths yet to walk, so little time left

watershed

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 236
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #12 on: 14:36:45, 25/07/20 »
From your comments, I Absolutely Understand where you are coming from.


Having seen them I could have advised that Shetland would definitely not be a place for you to visit.


Blackpool is meant to be quite a nice visit, well signposted, not to far from Wales, and have arcades and fun fairs for the kids.


The walking is quite easy too.


I gather they also sell some nice resin figures for the mantle piece as well:) 

In fact the Tower is almost exactly the same height as the 100 pus windmills that are coming here.

Gosh that might attract you back!



I agree that Orkney is a great place to visit though, and it would take a long time to visit all of its 50 plus Brochs and 3000 Neolithic sites.

I know that as I haven't really scratched the surface of Shetlands 80 plus Brochs or 5000 Neolithic sites.


 
« Last Edit: 17:17:17, 25/07/20 by watershed »

Ridge

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8269
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #13 on: 17:25:27, 25/07/20 »
Clearly DA works for the Shetland tourist board
Shetland is certainly wild and very bleak and Barron,
Sounds lovely, just like the sort of places I like to go walking.
Quote
You had to do your homework before visiting,
I do where ever I go
Quote
Shetland is more in tune with its closer proximity to Denmark and Sweden.
Loved Sweden so that is a plus.
Quote
Daddy, can we go to the beach, or funfair, sorry LUV we are on Shetland, 
No funfair wouldn't come as a surprise, I'd be sorely disappointed if there was one.

April

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8287
Re: Shetland Finished as a Wilderness Destination
« Reply #14 on: 18:43:49, 27/07/20 »
Shetland sounds wonderful to me too. Shame it is being spoiled by wind turbines.

Watershed you have my sympathy. It must be awful to have your home ruined like this  :(
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong