Author Topic: Wild camping  (Read 1473 times)

Lakeland Lorry

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #30 on: 17:57:15, 26/07/20 »

And in all seriousness, how easy is it to find and contact the owners of the land in all the areas in the Lake district? It says you are expected to ask them for permission afterall. That alone puts off the more responsible people, I feel, who are type of people who would probably help clear up the rubbish left behind by those who didn't give a hoot.


Here's a link to an article about land ownership in the Lake District, which was published in Cumbria Life in 2014.   Whilst it won't give you contact details of the landowners, it does provide an idea of who owns some of it:


https://calflyn.com/2014/09/03/this-land-is-our-land-this-land-is-your-land/




gunwharfman

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #31 on: 18:07:45, 26/07/20 »
I have a read of a similar site at times, certainly interesting if nothing else.

https://whoownsengland.org


ninthace

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #32 on: 08:24:08, 28/07/20 »
From the Telegraph today.  An extract from an article on wild camping and action to control it.


Trevor Beattie, chief executive of the South Downs National Park Authority, said he would encourage camping, but only at official campsites.
Rangers have noticed a “sharp increase” in illegal wild camping during the pandemic at historic sites, including Bronze Age barrows, he said.
“There is nothing better than camping out under the stars and, of course, we would encourage people to do that,” he told The Daily Telegraph.
“But we have a problem with influencers on Instagram posting pictures of their wild camps, and telling people to follow.
“I would like these people to make clear that they have either asked for permission – or are camping illegally.”
Mr Beattie said that many wild campers resented being “tarred with the same brush” as those who light fires and leave a mess.
“Some people complain that they arrive late, leave early, and leave no trace,” he said. “That may well be, but to those people I would say, ‘You are still committing an offence’. It’s pretty much impossible to draw a line between those who camp responsibly and those who don’t.”
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Jac

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #33 on: 09:23:59, 28/07/20 »
From the Telegraph today.  An extract from an article on wild camping and action to control it.
.................... It’s pretty much impossible to draw a line between those who camp responsibly and those who don’t.”

Really?
So many paths, so little time

WhitstableDave

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #34 on: 14:55:53, 28/07/20 »
I've just read through this thread and I couldn't help noticing what looks like conflicting guidance from the Lake District National Park Authority and the National Trust regarding human waste.

LDNPA: "Perform toilet duties at least 30m (100 ft) from water and bury the results with a trowel at all times...". (#25)

NT: "...take all litter home with you. This includes all human waste." (#26)

This isn't something I think about much, but this morning I passed the site of a recent wild camp while walking through my local woods. It was along a footpath only 10m from a main track. There was a scorched area about 1m across and quite a lot of toilet paper was strewn around. Not exactly the 'leave no trace' variety of wild camping!

I first came across the requirement to bag and take your poo away with you a few weeks ago during a treadmill walk in Zion National Park, Utah, USA. It had never occurred to me before that such a thing might be a requirement of wild camping and, at the time, I wondered if it might just be something that Americans do.

So... is there a right way of doing this? Or does it simply depend on who has jurisdiction over the camping spot?

gunwharfman

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #35 on: 14:57:16, 28/07/20 »
I'm still trying to work out why 'wild camping' has become such an issue in the newspapers? I know part of it is about rubbish being left behind but does 'rubbish' explain it all?

Is part of it the worry, resentment, doing something for free, or otherwise of the possibility that people wandering around the countryside without having to pay out and are enjoying themselves? I feel that the subject has got more depth to it but I can only speculate?

It's also noticeable to me that the Daily Express has jumped on part of the bandwagon because they are now into a campaign to clear it up or stop it happening in the first place. It doesn't surprise me though, they have been moaning about the 'selfish idiots' in the wider community who have left rubbish in parks and beaches for some time and they do love to find people for their readers to deamonise and to have a go at.

WhitstableDave

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #36 on: 15:11:51, 28/07/20 »
I'm still trying to work out why 'wild camping' has become such an issue in the newspapers? I know part of it is about rubbish being left behind but does 'rubbish' explain it all?

Is part of it the worry, resentment, doing something for free, or otherwise of the possibility that people wandering around the countryside without having to pay out and are enjoying themselves? I feel that the subject has got more depth to it but I can only speculate?

It's also noticeable to me that the Daily Express has jumped on part of the bandwagon because they are now into a campaign to clear it up or stop it happening in the first place. It doesn't surprise me though, they have been moaning about the 'selfish idiots' in the wider community who have left rubbish in parks and beaches for some time and they do love to find people for their readers to deamonise and to have a go at.

This is a subject I hadn't thought about until recently.

I don't care if people choose to pitch a tent on a treeless hill in some national park. I can easily go around 'their area' so it makes no difference to me.

However, about 10 days ago, my wife and I were walking through our local woods and we could smell smoke and hear voices well before we turned a corner and were almost on top of a wild camp. I'd never seen a wild camp in these woods before.

This morning, I investigated the spot on my way through the woods...

Branches were broken, there were the remains of what had been a sizeable fire, there was only one small piece of rubbish but a great deal of toilet paper was scattered around. My photo isn't very good, but hopefully it will give an indication:



I'd call the people who did this something much worse than "selfish idiots".

richardh1905

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #37 on: 15:19:42, 28/07/20 »
They've hardly left no trace, have they? And the risk of that fire getting out of hand must have been considerable.
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richardh1905

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #38 on: 15:22:42, 28/07/20 »
Just reading their guidelines again (not rules), and I'm surprised by the National Trust's tolerance of any kind of fire in the Lake District.
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gunwharfman

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #39 on: 21:16:01, 28/07/20 »
Re: photo and other peoples sightings. I wonder if the people who are into this sort of thing fall into any sort of category, age group ect?

Lakeland Lorry

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #40 on: 10:23:08, 29/07/20 »
I'm still trying to work out why 'wild camping' has become such an issue in the newspapers? I know part of it is about rubbish being left behind but does 'rubbish' explain it all?

Is part of it the worry, resentment, doing something for free, or otherwise of the possibility that people wandering around the countryside without having to pay out and are enjoying themselves? I feel that the subject has got more depth to it but I can only speculate?

It's also noticeable to me that the Daily Express has jumped on part of the bandwagon because they are now into a campaign to clear it up or stop it happening in the first place. It doesn't surprise me though, they have been moaning about the 'selfish idiots' in the wider community who have left rubbish in parks and beaches for some time and they do love to find people for their readers to deamonise and to have a go at.


Nothing to do with resentment or not paying.  [/size]As one of the Lake District Volunteers involved in monitoring and clearing up after these 'fly campers', I see at first hand the mess and destruction which is left behind.  Since the lockdown was lifted, the Lakes has been inundated with people pitching tents anywhere.   From what I've heard, it seems to be groups of people who are coming to the Lakes for the first time, who've seen others' Instagram posts of their 'wild camping' and think that they'll come and do the same thing.   


These people though aren't here for the walking, or the beauty, they are here to be with their mates having a massive p**s up and will pitch their tents anywhere they like.  Then walk away the next day, often leaving their tents, food, used BBQs, and human waste for others to clear up.  It's not just one or two people doing this, it's lots and lots of them.   Last week I heard reports of up to 60 tents pitched up at Styhead Tarn. 

The Lake District National Park, along with the National Trust, and other organisations are working together carrying out daily patrols in areas such as lakeshores, quarries, etc., and are moving people on, in an attempt to prevent further damage and destruction.  It really saddens me to here reports, on a daily basis, of more mess and destruction left behind. 

This article on Grough sums up what's been happening here in the Lakes (read the comments too):
https://www.grough.co.uk/magazine/2020/07/22/lakeland-police-step-up-patrols-to-tackle-anti-social-camping-in-national-park


« Last Edit: 10:27:02, 29/07/20 by Lakeland Lorry »

richardh1905

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #41 on: 11:17:55, 29/07/20 »
Last week I heard reports of up to 60 tents pitched up at Styhead Tarn.

Good grief! I have heard that Styhead is a bit of a hot spot for camping, but that is ridiculous.

..and here's me being surprised to see 5 tents in the vicinity of Lingcove Bridge yesterday.
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beefy

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #42 on: 11:25:45, 29/07/20 »
Quote
ast week I heard reports of up to 60 tents pitched up at Styhead Tarn.
:o :o :o
Leave only footprints, take only photographs, kill only time ...

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Jac

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #43 on: 12:01:49, 29/07/20 »
I'm still trying to work out why 'wild camping' has become such an issue in the newspapers? ..............

..............It's also noticeable to me that the Daily Express has jumped on part of the bandwagon because they are now into a campaign to

Just a thought, but perhaps the media coverage has brought the idea of 'wild' camping to the notice of people who might otherwise never even have considered it.
So many paths, so little time

beefy

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Re: Wild camping
« Reply #44 on: 12:04:07, 29/07/20 »
Heres a video I found
Absolute disgrace these people


https://youtu.be/TnGBH8xkRSY


If you don't want to watch the full video ff to 11mins

Leave only footprints, take only photographs, kill only time ...

#LeaveNoTrace youtube