Author Topic: new here, dumb username, enthusiastic to get fit, i like walking  (Read 751 times)

BrionyB

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It's scorching hot in London at the moment, so don't feel bad about not doing long walks right now - they say 34 degrees today, so I am not venturing further than the shady spot in the garden!


There are a surprising number of nice walks through green spaces not far from you; I did some of the southern sections of the Capital Ring when I first moved here, and found them more peaceful and pleasant than I expected. Or if you like the idea of getting out of town, maybe look up the Saturday Walkers Club; they do informal group walks if you want company, and also have a very helpful website and book with detailed routes if you prefer doing the walks alone.

Rob Goes Walking

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I started out getting fit on this forum at over 23 stone. Lost nearly all the weight but put 40 lbs back on recently after I injured myself on a 30K run. Back running again now, but I've got to build the distance up again, slowly.

As ninthace said walking should be a pleasure not a chore. That was a mistake I made, I started walking for pleasure not fitness but started going up big green hills, technically mountains some of them multiple times a week as a fitness grind and it ruined fell walking for me.

On the other hand, I did at least 15,000 steps a day (often over 30K, peaking at 50K) for several months around town mostly as a fitness grind and it was much less unpleasant.

Start slow and short and build up. I only did one walk that gave me multi-day DOMS (muscle soreness) a week. The rest of the time for my base 15K steps I did a 60 minute walk in the morning, a 60 minute walk in the afternoon and popped into town and back (20 minutes) every day. That was suitable for me, as others have said listen to your body. Your body (not your brain!) might be capable of a lesser or greater load. Being injured and losing your hard won fitness isn't good.

Don't be in a hurry to do the marathon, it takes quite some time to put that sort of distance in your legs and toughen them up. If you rush it, there's a good chance you'll injure yourself. As a rule of thumb running never increase running distance by more than 10% a week.

As for the puny arms, start with press-ups if you can manage a couple. It's free and the heavier you are the greater the strength you'll build.

Enjoy the forum!
« Last Edit: 06:20:30, 02/08/20 by Rob Goes Walking »

WhitstableDave

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I agree that walking should be a pleasure not a chore, but I also think it's important to stress that some people find pleasure in what - at the time - can be very hard work. In other words, the pleasure can also be about looking back on an achievement gained, whether that's reaching the summit of a mountain, traversing difficult terrain, completing a challenging distance, maintaining a brisk pace for a certain time, or even walking every single road in your nearest town.

I'll give what I think is a fair example: This year I wanted to walk 1000 miles by the end of the first week in April so as to beat my previous best. I needed to do 25 miles with two days to go, but frustratingly, I'd developed shin pains. I did the 25 miles, but by no stretch of the imagination could I claim they were pleasurable - on the second day, my legs hurt as I set off with 11 miles to do. My point is though, that the pleasure I got from completing what I'd been working towards for months far, far outweighed the lack of pleasure in those final walks.

I also think that when the aim is to get fit and/or to lose weight, contenting oneself with gentle ambles isn't going to get you very far. A programme of gradual improvement - carefully done, with aims and targets, with perseverance and patience, while 'listening' to your body will (IMHO!) be a lot more effective.

Rob Goes Walking

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Wasn't saying hard work can't be rewarding Dave. I don't exactly enjoy running, much like you it's the sense of achievement that gets me going. If you're going to be suffering might as well maximise your returns and do a more intense form of cardio than walking. Walking is good as a way of establishing base fitness and burning calories over multiple hours but beyond that it should be a pleasure in my view. Yours might vary.

Agree that a program of gradual improvement is the best way. Disagree gentle ambles are pointless for heavy people though, when you're very obese gentle ambles are hard and also burn lots of calories. An 8 hour walk is going to burn more calories than a 2 hour run for most people. There's not a huge amount of difference in calories burned walking and running a mile, the biggest factor is distance. Running burns so many more calories because you cross so many more miles in the same time. You quite possibly know all this but not everyone does...

richardh1905

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Walking I burn 100kcal/mile, running maybe 110kcal/mile - there really is very little difference.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

WhitstableDave

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Walking I burn 100kcal/mile, running maybe 110kcal/mile - there really is very little difference.
Agreed... as long as you're comparing energy used per mile and not energy used per hour.

fatmanwalking

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I will individually address your comments in another post, I just wanted to say that it's a really strange feeling for me to be ever so frustrated and disappointed in myself to then checking this forum thread to find that some how it lifts an incredibly large weight off of my heart.

I only really walked 3.56miles this afternoon and mentally I wasn't really feeling it, physically I could of done much more, I took a break on the grass like I've done before but I still wasn't up for putting in more effort; despite my mood I had already decided to do more and push through it.
I get up and my right ankle hurts quite a bit,  anyway I look ridiculous like I'm trying to walk on lego or something.
I hate to admit this but having an injury seemed like a great excuse to go home.




richardh1905

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Agreed... as long as you're comparing energy used per mile and not energy used per hour.


Yes, running at my normal (slowish) pace I cover twice as much ground as when walking on the flat, therefore I burn around twice as much energy.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

cornwallcoastpathdweller

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I will individually address your comments in another post, I just wanted to say that it's a really strange feeling for me to be ever so frustrated and disappointed in myself to then checking this forum thread to find that some how it lifts an incredibly large weight off of my heart.

I only really walked 3.56miles this afternoon and mentally I wasn't really feeling it, physically I could of done much more, I took a break on the grass like I've done before but I still wasn't up for putting in more effort; despite my mood I had already decided to do more and push through it.
I get up and my right ankle hurts quite a bit,  anyway I look ridiculous like I'm trying to walk on lego or something.
I hate to admit this but having an injury seemed like a great excuse to go home.


Dont worry about the distance at the moment, you walked further than me today!  just keep up the determination to succeed and it'll come.  Those miles all add up, some days are slower than others, but they all count in the end.
one step then another then another then a bench - please?