Author Topic: One for Barewirewalker!  (Read 1193 times)

barewirewalker

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Re: One for Barewirewalker!
« Reply #15 on: 08:02:45, 16/08/20 »
Yesterday Mrs BWW and I wandered off-piste. To be more accurate I led Mrs BWW on a willful trespass, however she is an enthusiastic follower and judging by her reactions to our walk, the course chosen that did not coincide with the Righteous Way, revealed all those breathtaking experiences that good location, interesting terrain and sublime weather can add to quality of way.

2weeks ago we made the mistake of calling in at Llanrhaeadr Falls, Berwyns, we did know not of the app that has turned this beauty spot in circus attraction. The local police had to be called in shut of the road so that the road good be use to get out. If ever I have felt at risk from Covid since March it was at Pistyl Rhaeadr.

However yesterday bought back that feeling of tranquility a few hours spent in our glorious countryside, rigidly adhering to those little green dots would not have revealed a panorama that could compare with Pistyl y Rhaeadr. The golden contour our wayward steps led us to did, in fact we were looking across at the Berwyn ridge, where I imagined a heaving mass of humanity, swanking around with their top of the range 4x4's, thinking they were getting in touch with the outback.

Mrs BWW was making free with the binoculars and giving a running commentary on the antics of a farmer with his quad machine tending his sheep. He was out in the open as were we, so I drew my lady into the lea of a gatepost to bland our shapes and as he left open ground, I merged our way with a scraggy hedgeline and a slight fold in the ground. No point in spoiling the moment with open confrontation, we reached a lengthy allowance of BOAT, an attractive track despite overgrown hedges on either side. So we were back on the Straight and Narrow, still good walking, but the piquant, forbidden condiments had spiced our route to a memorable degree.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

barewirewalker

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Re: One for Barewirewalker!
« Reply #16 on: 08:40:03, 28/08/20 »
Was this a bit strong;

All too often the occupiers of our countryside have used the excuse of criminality to limit access, this goes way back to the Lord of the Manor protecting hunting rights.

A bad landowner, who does not respect the wishes of others to share those elements of the countryside outside of food production deserves to be trespassed on.



As a walker who would also like better access to our countryside, I nevertheless feel the need to distance myself from this assertion, which is presented as if trespass were a "human right".

 While I might, myself, dislike some of the laws we have and while I respect the right of others to disagree with me about the proposed changes to this particular one, I cannot accept that someone who is abiding by the law - in however an unfriendly way - should "deserve" to be treated in an unlawful manner by others.

I seem to be the only person, who ever read the CLA's 2012 policy on Access. I believe the risk provided by the additional strength Criminalizing trespass will bring about is more wholesale than Busy G refers to;

This act would push the balance in their favour on all such paths.  I for one have no wish to land up in court discussing the matter, so would likely stop using them meaning the rest of the marked Row would soon fall out of use too and effectively be lost.

Here is a typical example. Priddacombe on Bodmin moor, SX167769

You will see others in that area too.

The Article referred to discusses trespass, did the Editor publish that article in the anticipation of connecting the act of trespass with the publicity surrounding the  proposed Criminalizing of Trespass. If so the Editor of the Guardian foresaw the very fears Buzy G expresses.

The Policy pursued by the CLA as stated in their 2012 document, is a clear precursor to pressurizing the removal of many footpaths and other RoWs that they consider unused.

I do not advocate trespassing for unnecessary intrusion into privacy but as a response to the selfish closure of parts of the countryside that clearly would benefit  the economic and social well being of everyone.


Whitstable Dave refers to open confrontation, but a good trespass is one unknown to the occupier, there is also Virtual Trespass, with the use of Google Earth, Historical OS maps, which I once carried out on this forum over the Palmer Tomkinson family land, demonstrating that footpaths, clearly left off the definitive map, would have linked a rural footbridge over the M4 to a station on the re-opened Watercress Railway line. Sadly investing my work in photobucket has put this in the waste bucket.

The generalization above drew a few comments,
I've got lots more questions, but for now I'd be happy just to know where the line is...

If we do not discuss it and find the practical examples of the pros and cons then the access network will be stalled in an imperfect form, freezing in time examples of past privilege, such as the redundant Grand Drive to Beaudesert Hall (a ruin since the 1930's) that could provide the beginning of a linear route across Cannock Chase then clear across Shropshire for more than 50 miles of countryside corridor.

BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

barewirewalker

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Re: One for Barewirewalker!
« Reply #17 on: 12:12:53, 15/09/20 »
There is, as best my memory serves me, a lovely phrase in the article or it's comment. I don't wish to seek it out but the essence has rattled around in my brain for some days now.


The idea that our accessibility to the countryside needs greater permeability backs up a lot of the criticism I have about the inflexibility that does not allow access to march in time with modern needs.

Cross reference this with another topic  and the dangers of criminalizing trespass just to make life easier for a minority to manage their assets, whose social importance is declining is folly. The time has long gone when the manorial entitlement was the controlling influence in large tracts of our countryside. Countryside employment is now well supported by the hospitality trade, long gone are the families dependent on the 'Downton Abbeys' of a bygone age.  Actually the farm workers wages of the 1950's and 60's are long gone and so many of the hostelries with them.

I think there are examples on our ordnance survey maps that suggests that the social need to trespass was more important than the occupiers right to withhold access. These examples are some of today's rights of way yet the reason of their usefulness has passed into history. Should such examples be found and used to demonstrate the need for greater permeability?

A bad land occupier is one who does not recognize how his occupation of part of the countryside affects countrywide.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

barewirewalker

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Re: One for Barewirewalker!
« Reply #18 on: 10:32:39, 18/09/20 »
All Hayes is doing is describing the first steps in this process  ::)
and now we can add Agent Orange from here
Hate to think this might become a criminal enclave  8)
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

pleb

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Re: One for Barewirewalker!
« Reply #19 on: 10:55:53, 18/09/20 »
and now we can add Agent Orange from here
Hate to think this might become a criminal enclave  8)
He's NOT the messiah.