Author Topic: Doug Scott  (Read 571 times)

myxpyr

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Doug Scott
« on: 10:30:20, 17/08/20 »
Sad news
https://abenteuer-berg.de/en/everest-legend-doug-scott-terminally-ill/
I cherish the memories of my first trip to the Himalaya with Doug's Community Action Treks

Theo Frum

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Re: Doug Scott
« Reply #1 on: 10:59:50, 17/08/20 »
That's sad. I went to see one of his slide lectures ~25 years ago, and a good evening it was, too. He told the tale of an occasion they were bivvying on a portaledge xx thousand feet up a sheer face. In the night he woke from a dream about paying attention to details, and found he'd forgotten to clip on.

barewirewalker

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Re: Doug Scott
« Reply #2 on: 11:02:52, 17/08/20 »
Sad news, when John Harlin died on the Eiger, Doug Scott and Dougal Haston stepped in to continue running his climbing school for Harlin's wife. The following summer I was in Chamonix, we had just come down from an Aiguille that I seem to remember we called The L'Eveque, time distance may have distorted the name. Doug and Dougal had taken over over our campsite with a group of American clients, in our absence, in those days you could leave your tents and spare gear unattended for several days.
However we were made very welcome in the enlarged camp and by coincidence they were going up to climb the very mountain we had come down from. We had a fun evening around a blazing log fire. For years the French Gendarmes had been trying to eradicate the Billet campsite, yet scruffy, impoverished British cragrats kept re-opening it each year by popping up like mushrooms overnight. Even supported by the Great Names of mountaineering.   
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

andybr

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Re: Doug Scott
« Reply #3 on: 12:34:02, 17/08/20 »
Very sad. One of the few remaining mountaineers who were genuine explorers rather than "just" athletes. I remember attending one of his lectures at York Alpine Club on the night of the famous big storm of 1987 and having to drive back to Scarborough in appalling weather with trees literally falling around us. Despite that I still think the most impressive thing about the night was finding out that his young daughter actually has a valley in the Himalaya named after her.

windyrigg

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Re: Doug Scott
« Reply #4 on: 08:51:59, 18/08/20 »
I liaised with Doug over a couple of projects in Nepal, massive respect for what he has achieved there, incredible commitment

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Doug Scott
« Reply #5 on: 13:17:42, 19/08/20 »
That is very sad news.
Ive met him on three occasions, and out of all the high profile Big name Everest climbers ive met, Doug Scott was the most hospitable of them all.

Very down to earth, with a hand grip that would make a grizzly bear wince.

We shook hands when he was doing a lecture in Trinity College in Carmarthen, back in 1991, and i do not think he realised his immense strength, high altitude climbers build up incredible muscle strength due to their profession.


Surviving the night in a tent on Everest with Dougal Haston at an altitude of 8700m  Crumbs thats high, over 28500ft, it makes camping on top of Snowdon a bit lame in comparison.


I had no idea he was nearly 80, blimey how time flies, were all getting older, but the loss of a personality who showed real warmth and affection to a total stranger, that's sad, and i will certainly remember him.
« Last Edit: 13:29:04, 19/08/20 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Doug Scott
« Reply #6 on: 16:53:46, 25/09/20 »
It was nice to see there was a feature on him, on the main BBC news last night. 25-9-2020
They also interviewed one of his sons, who was full of admiration for his father's Nepalese charity work.

Apart from Ray Mears, who was an out and out Gent, Doug Scott will always live long in my memory, as a proper gentleman, showing true warmth to a total stranger, in awe of his achievements.


How many times must these famous mountaineer's get pestered or asked for autographs.


Some famous personalities dislike it, and openly show their displeasure, of, OH not another idiot trying to get my autograph, or talk on a subject they have little knowledge about.


Not Doug Scott, he was really down to earth, and was about the only famous Himalayan climber who made me feel welcome and important.


His warm personality must have been the reason the BBC chose to mention him and his exploits on prime time tv.


High altitude climbing on the big peaks, is a very specialist area, not to everyones taste or interest, so it was pleasing to see Doug get a mention on national tv
« Last Edit: 17:03:05, 25/09/20 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

midweekmountain

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Re: Doug Scott
« Reply #7 on: 15:34:41, 27/09/20 »