Author Topic: TR - Stob a Choire Odhair - into the wild mountains above Rannoch Moor  (Read 1789 times)

Birdman

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Great report and photos Richard! I climbed this 3 years ago together with Stob Ghabhar and enjoyed it as much as you did. Views to Rannoch Moor are fantastic.
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richardh1905

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Thanks Birdman  :)  - most people do the two mountains as a pair, it would seem, but I have form in not doing so.


Ben Cruachan but not Stob Daimh
Tom a Choinich but not Toll Creagach
Mullach Clach a'Bhlair but not Sgor Gaoith
Ben More but not Stob Binnein


and now Stob a Coire Odhair but not Stob Ghabhar

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vizzavona

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Hello...I too have a bit of form on missing out hills. All the more delights to encounter when having to return to an area.  Looking at my log for November 1970 our eyes must have been set on Stob Ghabhar and to reach the far end in a short of daylight day for Meall a'Bhuiridh the hill above the now ski area. Not sure, if at that time, that Creise was one of the anointed summits. Anyway a return trip some time later for a visit to Stob a Choire Odhair and much later for Creise my penultimate Hill of the high ones. 
I can recall stays at the Clashgour hut and at the Blackrock Cottage.
There are several big hills out towards Ben Starav two of which we reached from a camp at the bridge near to Inveroran Hotel and the others more easily from Glen Etive.  Glen Etive is a very fine base with hills of all categories on both sides of the Glen. ;)  although like many other places in Scotland choose the Month of visit to avoid the Midge Plague.
On one occasion My wife and I gave up pitching our tent in Etive and we drove around to the camping beside the Inveroran bridge only to drive back next morning to continue tracking down another Etive hill.
The hills are a grand way to spend time just doing enjoyable trudging.

richardh1905

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...but as I am not an aspirant Munroist, this isn't a problem for me.  ;)
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Birdman

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Thanks Birdman  :)  - most people do the two mountains as a pair, it would seem, but I have form in not doing so.


Ben Cruachan but not Stob Daimh
Tom a Choinich but not Toll Creagach
Mullach Clach a'Bhlair but not Sgor Gaoith
Ben More but not Stob Binnein


and now Stob a Coire Odhair but not Stob Ghabhar


Yes, people often climb pairs. The ones you list above I have also all climbed together.


I got curious and because I keep my munro walks in excel, I was able to get my own statistics how many I typically climb per outing. As expected, it peaks at 2 munros per walk. These are my personal statistics but I think they are fairly typical:





The extreme at 7 is of course the South Shiel Ridge and the 6 is in Glenshee.

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vizzavona

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...but as I am not an aspirant Munroist, this isn't a problem for me.  ;)
Hello.....from what I read there are many who become kind-of driven to get around the high Scottish Hills and also with some the 'so called Wild Camping'....I just camp in sheltered places in the hills and don't write much about it.
My own introduction to the Hills was through the a Youth Group and with School Teachers into and on the Cairngorms.
Thereafter the Hills were reached by using Trains, buses and hitching lifts.  Some of the Munros, Corbetts and the others were reached after topping out on climbs and after forty years of annual holidays many Scottish summits were reached.
An early holiday was influential when based for a week at Loch Coruisk in the Cuillin and after crossing the ridge a further week was spent on Glen Brittle side of the range.
I didn't get into the European Hills until in my late fifties.


vizzavona

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Yes, people often climb pairs. The ones you list above I have also all climbed together.


I got curious and because I keep my munro walks in excel, I was able to get my own statistics how many I typically climb per outing. As expected, it peaks at 2 munros per walk. These are my personal statistics but I think they are fairly typical:





The extreme at 7 is of course the South Shiel Ridge and the 6 is in Glenshee.


A very professional approach to Logging your adventures and with amazing images....do you have long holidays from a working life.  I hope that you don't find this too prying.

richardh1905

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I used to be a peak bagger, perhaps up until my thirties. But then family came along, and priorities got changed!


Now, whilst I like to include a summit (or sometimes several summits) in a walk, it is more about bagging a good day out, and I'm just as happy exploring and experiencing somewhere like the River Eidart and Glen Feshie, or, more recently, Lingcove Beck.
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richardh1905

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In fact I would go so far as to say that I am really pleased that I have not done the Munros - the Highlands still retain a sense of mystery to me, unexplored territory, so much to look forward to.
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richardh1905

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Yes, people often climb pairs. The ones you list above I have also all climbed together.
...
The extreme at 7 is of course the South Shiel Ridge and the 6 is in Glenshee.


Very thorough. I have kept a written hill walking diary, and now I have a blog, which I regard as a natural extension to the diary, but I have never gone so far as to create a spreadsheet.


My biggest daily Munro tally was 5 around the head of Glen Clova, an epic day in full winter conditions - My friend Rod and I set off in the dark and got back after dark, and were up to our thighs in snow at times. Memories. :)
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Birdman

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[/font]I used to be a peak bagger, perhaps up until my thirties. But then family came along, and priorities got changed!Now, whilst I like to include a summit (or sometimes several summits) in a walk, it is more about bagging a good day out, and I'm just as happy exploring and experiencing somewhere like the River Eidart and Glen Feshie, or, more recently, Lingcove Beck.
[/font]


Actually I have the same attitude. Bagging some peaks is for me mainly just an excuse to visit areas that I would otherwise perhaps not have visited. Virtually every munro bagging walk that I have done, including the ones that didn't look very exiting on paper, turned out to be fantastic walks, be it for the hills themselves, the flora and fauna, the ever changing skies or just the sometimes long walk-in to get to these hills. That's where my motivation comes from. I have bagged 182/282 so far but in recent years shifted my attention towards long multiday walks without necessarily bagging peaks along the way. Unfortunately, I live far away from Scotland and during the best hiking months I'm usually somewhere else, so I'm not sure how much my list will grow in the future.


Very thorough. I have kept a written hill walking diary, and now I have a blog, which I regard as a natural extension to the diary, but I have never gone so far as to create a spreadsheet.


My munro list is just a list in excel with hills and dates. The graph I posted I just generated this morning from this list with a few excel codes. I'm a bit of a nerd, so I keep lists of many things. I'm more obsessed with my (life) bird species list (2372 species and counting), but actually that serves the same purpose as the munro list: an excuse to initiate wonderful outdoor adventures! :).

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richardh1905

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Unbeknown to me, my wife shot a short video on her phone from the summit of Stob a Choire Odhair. I've edited it to chop out my son, who pops up like a cheeky imp at the end of the original!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WtakmJcwyI
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richardh1905

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...but actually that serves the same purpose as the munro list: an excuse to initiate wonderful outdoor adventures! :) .


And that, ultimately, is what matters. :)
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