Author Topic: Mental Health and Hiking  (Read 2135 times)

Birdman

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #30 on: 11:22:46, 26/08/20 »

The problem is that all emotional problems are now pooled together as "mental health", as if they are all the same thing. Somebody suffering from real clinical depression or anxiety is something completely different than, say, some single elderly people feeling even more isolated and lonely because of Covid-19. Both require attention, but it is not helpful to pool them all under "mental health". So, as another person on this forum already suggested, we need to differentiate better with terminology.


It reminds me of the recent discussions about "wild camping", which apparently now includes people parking their car on the roadside, having a barbecue and leaving the next morning while leaving their litter behind. They are now put in the same bracket as backpack leave-no-trace camping in remote areas.
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gunwharfman

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #31 on: 11:33:13, 26/08/20 »
One of my examples, not obvious at first but as you read the word 'stress' starts to slip in -

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/aug/26/how-to-take-the-perfect-breath-why-learning-to-breathe-properly-could-change-your-life

I could be cynical and suggest its someone who is an entrepreneur, or trying to be one, trying to 'cash in' on the umbrella term 'mental health problems' and of course the activity yoga is mentioned as well. Personally I'll just stick to running.

ninthace

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #32 on: 14:08:54, 26/08/20 »
One of my examples, not obvious at first but as you read the word 'stress' starts to slip in -

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/aug/26/how-to-take-the-perfect-breath-why-learning-to-breathe-properly-could-change-your-life

I could be cynical and suggest its someone who is an entrepreneur, or trying to be one, trying to 'cash in' on the umbrella term 'mental health problems' and of course the activity yoga is mentioned as well. Personally I'll just stick to running.
Personally I think running should be in the sucking the joy out of walking thread. but you have to be mental to want to run when you can walk :)
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WhitstableDave

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #33 on: 14:14:52, 26/08/20 »
Personally I think running should be in the sucking the joy out of walking thread. but you have to be mental to want to run when you can walk :)
As with so many things we discuss here, walking and running are not mutually exclusive - unless, of course, you see running as exercise...  ;)

GoneWest

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #34 on: 14:21:37, 26/08/20 »
For any individual at any particular time, walking and running are definitely mutually exclusive! Just like when I was once told that "A Scout smiles and whistles under all circumstances".

ninthace

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #35 on: 15:02:40, 26/08/20 »
As with so many things we discuss here, walking and running are not mutually exclusive - unless, of course, you see running as exercise...  ;)
They certainly cannot be done concurrently.  When I worked for HM, I had to able to run a distance in a given time so I had to be in training to do it.  As an activity I found it left a lot to be desired.  It was hot, sweaty, tiring and sometimes painful with little opportunity to truly enjoy one's surroundings.  As a means of entertainment, I found it to be a non starter.  Now that HM no longer requires my services I have a choice.  Therefore, given the option of walking or running from A to B I will organise myself so that I either have sufficient time to walk there or I will arrange transport.  To do otherwise in my book is lunacy  :) which is why I light heartedly dropped the opinion into this thread but please do not use it to drift from an important subject.  À chacun son goût. O0
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branchini1979

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #36 on: 08:37:45, 29/08/20 »
Good Morning,


I have read all the posts and thought I would contribute my own situation.


I love the great outdoors and walking/hiking but alas I also am a social person but that side of it has fell down dramatically.
I am 40 years old and chose not to have kids and all my friends have young children that take over their lives and I rarely see anyone now.
I do go for walks where I can and it does help a bit but I miss going for long walks with people I can chat rubbish to and socialise.
This over the years has really brought me down and my depression and anxiety have gotten real bad, with loneliness and isolation being the big factor.


I don't suppose anybody knows of places I could join which would not only do local walks but trips to places like Yorkshire Dales/Lakes etc?
I did look into the our local ramblers but I know my mother in law is a member and know that I would be one of the youngest and would not quite be right for me.


I will keep going on solo walks but I do hope I am able to join people in group walks and to others that are suffering, I hope it all works out for you.
Keep walking everyone and stay healthy

windyrigg

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #37 on: 15:01:51, 29/08/20 »
I'm sure you would be welcomed on walks with the Ramblers and similar. Certainly I'm aware of several smaller / informal groups around here (Northumberland) with walks of varying lengths & difficulty. The Ramblers can be contacted online, other clubs and groups may take a little more searching out. I also usually walk alone (through choice) but I can see how some people have become more isolated lately. Best of luck O0

Rob Goes Walking

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #38 on: 16:14:31, 29/08/20 »
I have been diagnosed with Binge Eating Disorder. I won't describe the process but it's basically an addiction. Anyway people said "No excuses!" and "commitment" and it frustrated me because I was trying really hard and they didn't seem to understand I couldn't control it. They were right but without the right mental system it was like turning the ignition on a car with no fuel in. So I searched. I found a system that handed me control back by reading books, I acted on a recommendation and read a book with a mental trick that didn't just resonate, but instantly reprogrammed my mind (our minds are remarkably plastic).

I now have control, more control than I've ever had and not just over binge eating, all of myself.

People with my condition have been scientifically shown to have structural differences in the brain or so I'm told. That doesn't matter. I have still been able to tame it using a simple trick from a book written by a PhD in psychology who conquered his own eating problems then used his psychological prowess to package his solution for others.

I hypothesise that the problems of many mental health comditions can be overcome with the right systems no matter how physical it is. All of our minds are physical right? We exist in a physical reality.

But people need a system because blindly applying willpower simply doesn't work. Willpower is required, lots of it, but it needs to be applied the right way.

So ninthace, I disagree with your post that people have the cure in their own hands but agree making victims of ourselves isn't helpful. Nobody wants to be dysfunctional all things being equal, they plainly don't have the cure in their own hands until someone convinces them they do, 100% and they believe it and live it and breathe it and shows them how to organise their mind to assert control. This may not work for everyone, I haven't walked a mile in their shoes even if I think I can relate I perceive their struggles through my own lens, I don't know what they think or how it feels to be them it could be quite different to what I estimate.

It worked for me though.

ninthace

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #39 on: 16:41:38, 29/08/20 »
Good Morning,


I have read all the posts and thought I would contribute my own situation.


I love the great outdoors and walking/hiking but alas I also am a social person but that side of it has fell down dramatically.
I am 40 years old and chose not to have kids and all my friends have young children that take over their lives and I rarely see anyone now.
I do go for walks where I can and it does help a bit but I miss going for long walks with people I can chat rubbish to and socialise.
This over the years has really brought me down and my depression and anxiety have gotten real bad, with loneliness and isolation being the big factor.


I don't suppose anybody knows of places I could join which would not only do local walks but trips to places like Yorkshire Dales/Lakes etc?
I did look into the our local ramblers but I know my mother in law is a member and know that I would be one of the youngest and would not quite be right for me.


I will keep going on solo walks but I do hope I am able to join people in group walks and to others that are suffering, I hope it all works out for you.
Keep walking everyone and stay healthy
You could try one or more of https://www.walkinginengland.co.uk/essex/groups.php
Solvitur Ambulando

Mel

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #40 on: 17:22:53, 29/08/20 »
Hi branchini


Regarding the social isolation/loneliness factor, the age range of groups I’ve looked into joining hasn’t even crossed my mind as a reason to discount them.  Several years ago I joined our local Womens Institute, partly to support the work they do in the local community and partly because the other option was to sit in house, on my own with too much thinking time.  I’m one of the youngest in the group and, to quote our strapline, “it’s not all Jam and Jerusalem”!  Yes, they have the “traditional sub-groups” of knitting, sewing and baking and such like, but there’s also a book club, a lunch club, an evening dining club, a walking group, a cycling group, a running group and, up until lockdown, there was a fledgling canoeing group getting set up.  Not to mention the stuff the National Federation organise.  Trips away, educational stuff ranging from crafts to languages to ironmongery (you just pay your money and they sort out the rest). 
 
I think the point I’m trying to make is, don’t discount a “social group” just because of age. It might not be “just quite right for you” initially but you never know where it might take you.  You’ll never know for sure until you give it a go.  Finding reasons not to could just be the anxiety/depression talking..
 
Beyond the Ramblers, there seems to be very few “local” walking clubs that exist that do regular local walks and organise trips elsewhere.  I can imagine this being down to the health and safety red tape and politics surrounding setting up an “official” club.  All I know is there’s naff all in my local area that do weekend walks, so I have to make do with walking predominantly alone, interspersed with occasional local dog walks with my pal and a monthly local but longer walk with my group.
 
My new years resolution was to post regular forum meets on here so I could get my fix of hills and have some company (hopefully!), plus it would give me the incentive to maintain a semblance of hill-fitness.  But Covid/lockdown put paid to that.
 
For walks in the National Parks, there used to be Ranger-led walks (I’ve been on a few and always enjoyed them).  Not sure if they’re on hold at the moment though.  Similarly, your local council might have a list of walking clubs.
 
For anxiety/depression, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is very effective.
 
Is the search over if you find nothing?
https://snailspacewalks.blogspot.com/

pleb

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #41 on: 17:50:26, 29/08/20 »
There's used to be a group called the spices (as in spice of life) who did all sorts inc walks, hand gliding, etc not sure if they still exist.

pleb

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #42 on: 17:56:11, 29/08/20 »
It's spiceuk. Com just looked.

gunwharfman

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #43 on: 15:36:49, 30/08/20 »
I read this today. I've always admired Mr Cambell, he writes about his problems in what I think is a useful raw way. He also seems to have made some money out of it as well, which as a Capitalist I don't mind at all.

https://www.theguardian.com/global/2020/aug/30/alastair-campbell-surviving-depression-how-i-learned-to-live-with-my-enemy

Brandywell

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Re: Mental Health and Hiking
« Reply #44 on: 19:34:11, 31/08/20 »
I read this today. I've always admired Mr Cambell, he writes about his problems in what I think is a useful raw way. He also seems to have made some money out of it as well, which as a Capitalist I don't mind at all.

https://www.theguardian.com/global/2020/aug/30/alastair-campbell-surviving-depression-how-i-learned-to-live-with-my-enemy
My heart bleeds - He has much to be depressed about. ::)
Watch where you are putting your feet : AW