Author Topic: Thinking about trying a quilt.  (Read 630 times)

gunwharfman

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Re: Thinking about trying a quilt.
« Reply #15 on: 09:47:42, 01/09/20 »
'This is true, but I suspect that most of these savings will be offset by the fact that you'll need a thicker quilt compared to a sleeping bag because it is less effective in sealing off the warm air. On cold nights you are going to feel the leaks and any cold spots in general.'

As an individual who has used a quilt over the last few years, I would say that your view may, or may not be true or it's just a matter of personal opinion? Like your quilt at home, to be at the right temperature it has to be wide enough to cover you, or you have to use the suggested method of pulling the edges under your torso. I don't have to do this because for my body size my quilt is wide enough.

The other matter of course is, are you buying your quilt (or sleeping bag) for the coldest temperature only, or for a range of temperatures? I personally buy to cover a 'range of temperarures,' from warm summer nights to autumn cold nights. In the daytime I've always found that the best way to adapt to changes in temperature is to use the layer method. Likewise I practice the same at night and I find that this way of thinking works very well for me. To me its the 'system' method, or to think of it another way, its how to 'blend' the positive of one item to back up/improve the positive of another item. I personally do not want to carry excess weight, I want a maximum 50L rucksack so planning on the basis of working with individual items is not for me. That way of thinking just adds bulk and weight on my back.

In the end, to buy or to not buy a quilt is a personal choice, but this choice could also be influenced by how you think about your equipment as well.

Birdman

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Re: Thinking about trying a quilt.
« Reply #16 on: 12:13:19, 01/09/20 »

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'This is true, but I suspect that most of these savings will be offset by the fact that you'll need a thicker quilt compared to a sleeping bag because it is less effective in sealing off the warm air. On cold nights you are going to feel the leaks and any cold spots in general.'


As an individual who has used a quilt over the last few years, I would say that your view may, or may not be true or it's just a matter of personal opinion?
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Of course this is a matter of personal preference and experience. I'm just giving my perspective on this. Yours is just as valid. If something works for you, by all means that is what you should go for!


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Like your quilt at home, to be at the right temperature it has to be wide enough to cover you, or you have to use the suggested method of pulling the edges under your torso. I don't have to do this because for my body size my quilt is wide enough.
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My point was that if it is wide enough not to let any openings, or pulling the edges under your feet, torso, legs and feet to seal all air leaks off, it cannot be much smaller than a mummy bag is. It depends on your sleeping style as well. A mummy bag doesn't create air-leaks when you move around, roll on your side, etc but if you don't move much this will be less of an issue I guess.


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The other matter of course is, are you buying your quilt (or sleeping bag) for the coldest temperature only, or for a range of temperatures? I personally buy to cover a 'range of temperarures,' from warm summer nights to autumn cold nights. In the daytime I've always found that the best way to adapt to changes in temperature is to use the layer method. Likewise I practice the same at night and I find that this way of thinking works very well for me. To me its the 'system' method, or to think of it another way, its how to 'blend' the positive of one item to back up/improve the positive of another item. I personally do not want to carry excess weight, I want a maximum 50L rucksack so planning on the basis of working with individual items is not for me. That way of thinking just adds bulk and weight on my back.


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It has to cover the entire range from well below freezing till above 30 Celsius. Sometimes I get that range within the same day and even on the same location (common in high desert). If it is very warm, I sleep in only my (silk) liner. If it gets colder, I enter my sleepingbag and keep it partly zipped open. Especially keeping the foot-end open and sleep with my legs out works well on warm nights. On cooler nights I zip the bag closed completely. Even colder and I wear longjohns, beany etc and start using the hood of my sleepingbag. At the coldest end of the scale I also wear my downjacket inside my sleepingbag. So like you, I use the layered approach both day and night.


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In the end, to buy or to not buy a quilt is a personal choice, but this choice could also be influenced by how you think about your equipment as well.
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I agree that it's a personal choice, but this choice doesn't depend on layering because that applies to both. I know that quilts work well for many people so I'm not arguing with that at all. I just think that in practice the weight savings are overstated if you were to compare them at their practical usable temperature limits. In my own use case I think a quilt would actually work out heavier than a mummy with the same warmth. As I said before, there is a reason why mummy bags were invented: they probably offer the best warmth per weight. But if you choose a mummy, get one with a full-length 2-way zip or you'll be too hot on some nights.
My travel and walking reports: https://www.hikingbirdman.com/