Author Topic: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?  (Read 1089 times)

PatrickJ

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 28
Hi Folks,


As a family we have a couple of dogs that typically get walked round the local park or on shorter kid friendly walks.


Now I've started walking longer distances I've been taking just the younger one with me (a medium sized 1 year old Cockapoo).


How far should I be walking with dog in tow, he's  enjoyed the last few 6 mile walks I've done but how far could I stretch that?  I'm signed up to do a 12 mile walk weekend after next - is that too far do you think?  I don't want to have to carry him.


Thanks

Apache

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 64
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #1 on: 10:55:03, 03/09/20 »
My 10 year old Cocker Spaniel managed 10 miles daily on the Peddars Way during a very hot Summer, but I had to carry a 3 year old Cavalier King Charles down Coniston Old Man. I think the problem was the size of the drop in some places.

cornwallcoastpathdweller

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 91
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #2 on: 11:04:19, 03/09/20 »
A lot of people suggest short walks while dogs are young and still growing, a lot of sense in that, but id imagine the distance ability of a dog would be more tied to its breed, fitness level and the heat.  For example, a 6 year old Collie could probably walk the legs off a horse and still want more, but a 1 year old pug could struggle to get out of its bed on a summers day.


I think the best thing to do is continue to build up the lengths with the dog you have and keep an eye on it. Id be very suprised if yours couldnt do 12 miles on a cool day - not known for being lazy are Cocapoo's.


My dog soon tells me when he's had enough by slowing down noticably.  He's a small 8 year old Jack Russell, and quite happy to cover 25 miles over a day (he did 28 on the Cotswold Way last Saturday) unless its hot in which case he cant do half of that.  The heat plays a big part, so take any oppertunity to give your four legged friend a swim and lots of drinks.
one step then another then another then a bench - please?

shortwalker

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 36
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #3 on: 11:10:23, 03/09/20 »
Depends on the dog, the guy down the road from us, used to walk his Golden Retriever about 7 miles every day. I on the other hand, helping out a friend took their Red Setter for a 2 mile walk and  the day after he was at the vets as he wouldn't get out of basket. Always went in the kitchen when I went round after that. It actually coward when I pick up his lead once.

fatmanwalking

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #4 on: 11:11:21, 03/09/20 »
sounds like a lot of poo to pick up

Bigfoot_Mike

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2032
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #5 on: 19:42:49, 03/09/20 »
The size and breed of dog will have an impact on stamina. A few years ago I organised a charity sponsored walk that was over 11 miles and 3,000 feet of ascent. Many of the 150+ walkers were accompanied by dogs. At the post walk barbecue it was easy to see which dogs had coped the best. The small dogs like Jack Russells were desperate to claim a sausage or burger. The larger German Shepherds were crashed out and showed no interest at all in the barbecue. There were some step prolonged ascents, and one of the walkers asked which sadist had designed the course. All humans and dogs made it safely back to base.

emdaw

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 54
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #6 on: 22:02:06, 04/09/20 »
Think you have to be the judge of that, we have a Border Terrier who in theory should be able to walk many miles, however ours is fit not overweight but has never had the stamina to walk anything much over 5 / 6 miles.  We meet many other walkers with Border Terriers who have done 15+ miles and still looking fresh and will bound around all day.  So the advice I would give is know your dog and see how they are on various walks. If they are young you can build their stamina in the same way we build our fitness / stamina by gradually increasing distance and the other important thing to consider is the terrain and ascent etc.   O0 O0

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5498
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #7 on: 08:19:04, 05/09/20 »
A young adult cockapoo should be good for many a mile - will probably walk the legs off you!
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5498
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #8 on: 08:21:49, 05/09/20 »
Our Springer Spaniel has been on many a long walk - she is tireless on the hill, but does like to crash out when we finish.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

Rivingtonboots

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 24
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #9 on: 09:17:37, 05/09/20 »
Our 8 year old staffie (Polo) loves his walks and looks like the proverbial fit as a butchers dog.
When our nephew brings his Springer spaniel out poor Polo looks sloth like in comparison ;D though.


A country pub at the end of a walk with a load of crashed out dogs among muddy boots seems like heaven for human and dog both imo.

Dyffryn Ardudwy

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1817
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #10 on: 12:49:04, 05/09/20 »
Last Monday, being a Bank Holiday, i came across two couples who were walking their dogs.
One was enjoying a walk from Ogwen, as far as Carnedd llewelyn, and were thinking of descending via Craig Yr Ysfa, and back down the Fynnon Llugwy reservoir road.

i explained that there was a small section of rock, where they might have to manhandle or carry their dog, which they thought was a bit of an issue.
My suggestion was to return back towards Carnedd Dafydd, and use the grass slope to gain access to the Reservoir road that way, which they agreed upon.

The other dog, was with a man walking the Central Ridge of the Carneddau, from the Bwlch Y Ddeufaen, and i saw them going in the opposite direction to me, on Yr Elens summit.
They were both from the Wirral, and looked very mountain hardy, and at ease in the environment.

Everytime someone mentions a dog and the countryside, i always think about the Joss Naylor dvd, where his faithful border collie, named Spy, accompanies him on all his epic adventures.
That has got to be the fittest dog on the planet, because when Mr Naylor set his mind boggling Lakes & Mears record, his pooch ran along side him the entire way.

cornwallcoastpathdweller

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 91
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #11 on: 17:15:55, 06/09/20 »
i over did it the once when Mutley was quite young, around 1, walked the swcp from Padstow to Newquay which is about 25 miles.  Had to carry the poor thing the last mile and for the few before that everytime somebody came the other way he'd abandon me and start following them just in case their car was closer.  Makes me feel guilty but smile each time i remember it.  :)
one step then another then another then a bench - please?

Rivingtonboots

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 24
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #12 on: 17:36:40, 06/09/20 »
Just after we'd got our boy in May 2014 I'd bought some Salomon walking shoes and the weather was perfect when I'd got in from work on a Friday.
My knees were still ok-ish so i half ran half walked the 16 miles over Rivington Moor including Great Hill and White Coppice.
It was that day that I discovered how dogs can go from full of beans to asleep at the drop of a hat.
The boy gets his walks and treats in pubs, we get to keep fit, see the countryside and visit nice pubs.
Winner winner all round

Dyffryn Ardudwy

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1817
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #13 on: 17:38:14, 06/09/20 »
He obviously was not mountain hardy, or fit as a butchers dog.
Many pooches are in the same category as their owners, OBESE, and you can see them both struggling out of puff.

The Wirral pooch, last Monday afternoon, was switched on, in tune with his environment, and any call to heel, by his master was instantly listened to.

One can forgive a young pup, barely a year old, but the only way to get mountain fit, is to be amongst the hills.

Mr Josh Naylor and collie Spy will back me up on that.

Bhod

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 660
Re: Walking with dogs, what distances are suitable?
« Reply #14 on: 18:27:32, 06/09/20 »
One of my Springer Spaniels (at the age of 3) completed the Lyke Wake Walk with me, we arrived home and he crashed out in front of the fire.  I'd left something in the car by accident so picked up the car keys to retrieve it, the dog heard them and shot to the back door thinking it was time for another walk. :D
I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake.