Author Topic: Weather prof jacket  (Read 653 times)

DaveLansdell

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Weather prof jacket
« on: 21:18:58, 19/09/20 »
Looking for starting point in my search ... looking for warmth more than rain proof... as will wear as an extra layer


Thanks

richardh1905

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Re: Weather prof jacket
« Reply #1 on: 21:40:01, 19/09/20 »
I generally wear a fleece with a gore tex jacket on top if it is windy and cold.
My approach is to use any old fleece - I have several of different thicknesses, none expensive, most tatty, and spend my money on a really decent waterproof and breathable outer shell - I've recently bought a Mountain Equipment Tupilak jacket, which is excellent - but it did cost me £265. Having said that, I do expect it to last me several years of heavy use (its predecessor did), so cost per year is not too bad.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

DaveLansdell

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Re: Weather prof jacket
« Reply #2 on: 21:46:14, 19/09/20 »
I generally wear a fleece with a gore tex jacket on top if it is windy and cold.
My approach is to use any old fleece - I have several of different thicknesses, none expensive, most tatty, and spend my money on a really decent waterproof and breathable outer shell - I've recently bought a Mountain Equipment Tupilak jacket, which is excellent - but it did cost me £265. Having said that, I do expect it to last me several years of heavy use (its predecessor did), so cost per year is not too bad.


Thatís what I was thinking ... I have a Berghaus Only a few years old, then as I thought get a waterproof outer layer ..


Thanks for the reply

BuzyG

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Re: Weather prof jacket
« Reply #3 on: 00:10:08, 22/09/20 »
I agree with what Richard has said. I have four cheap fleeces of various thicknesses. I choose the one I think will be right for the conditions.  Then an ME Gortex shell to keep the water out.  On cold days I also carry a cheap synthetic fleece that has no arms but has a hood.  I find it ideal to throw on over my shell layer during stops. It prevents me cooling down too quickly.

Eyelet

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Re: Weather prof jacket
« Reply #4 on: 10:17:08, 22/09/20 »
I agree that flexible layering is the way to go to match your insulation to your activity and external temperature as it varies during your day.


I would also recommend a thin Pertex windshirt as a must have top. It is the size of an apple when packed and weighs very little. If you havenít used one before, you will be surprised just how warm the combination of a base layer, a fleece layer and the windshirt can be and it is so much more breathable than a membrane softshell like Windbloc, Windstopper etc.



I dislike putting a hard shell Goretex jackets on top unless it is actually raining and prefer a more breathable jacket, such as a RAB vapour-rise.

richardh1905

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Re: Weather prof jacket
« Reply #5 on: 10:59:39, 22/09/20 »
I have a cycling jacket made out of something like Pertex, an excellent lightweight windproof jacket that I can literally put un my pocket. It's a bit of a neat cut though, so not so good over the top of a fleece.


I have found Gore Tex Pro to be extremely breathable, and I speak as someone who 'runs hot' - I lost 2kg in sweat on a recent overnighter in the fells during excessively humid weather (the night of the thunderstorms). Not cheap though. :o
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

Rivingtonboots

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Re: Weather prof jacket
« Reply #6 on: 13:14:44, 22/09/20 »
I generally wear a fleece with a gore tex jacket on top if it is windy and cold.
My approach is to use any old fleece - I have several of different thicknesses, none expensive, most tatty, and spend my money on a really decent waterproof and breathable outer shell - I've recently bought a Mountain Equipment Tupilak jacket, which is excellent - but it did cost me £265. Having said that, I do expect it to last me several years of heavy use (its predecessor did), so cost per year is not too bad.
me and my missus still wear Tog goretex jackets that are 15+ years old.
They have a mesh lining and much better in the cold than the waterproof shells we have.
I only need a base layer and tee shirt underneath.
Having said that, if its wet but not cold I'd take something else.

clyoung

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Re: Weather prof jacket
« Reply #7 on: 19:16:39, 22/09/20 »
When you say as an extra layer, do you mean something to sling over the top of everything else (including possibly a wet waterproof) for extra warmth at a lunch stop or an extra mid-layer to wear while walking?

For the former in winter I carry a reversible jacket made by Berg and stuffed with lots of Primaloft Silver insulation that I picked up cheap from Sports Pursuit about 4 years ago. The outer withstands light drizzle but even if it gets soaked it still adds useful extra warmth. Since I bought it the trend seems to be for new fancy synthetics that mimic down more closely by being in lots of little bits, but this has a sheet of insulation inside it. It's not as warm as it was, I think the insulation has degraded somewhat, but it's still useful. Lots of companies do this sort of jacket and as they're not the in thing they tend not to be too pricey.

For a mid-layer I love my Rab Alpha Flux jacket, which again I picked up in a sale. Not at all sure it would be worth the full price but I do find it works brilliantly at wicking the sweat away and keeping me just the right temperature as I go up and down hill. It's a snug fit, in summer I wear it over a wicking t-shirt, in winter over a thermal base layer. I wore it in the Brecon Beacons in the snow over a thermal base layer and that was warm enough while I was walking uphill. When I need more, I add my waterproof or softshell, and if I'm stopped I add the insulated coat.

Eyelet

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Re: Weather prof jacket
« Reply #8 on: 19:50:19, 22/09/20 »

For a mid-layer I love my Rab Alpha Flux jacket


I also endorse this material in my Norrone Lofoten Alpha 120 jacket for exactly the same reasons and I use the same layering (I got mine in a sale too) - brilliant piece of kit.

DaveLansdell

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Re: Weather prof jacket
« Reply #9 on: 21:08:46, 22/09/20 »

I also endorse this material in my Norrone Lofoten Alpha 120 jacket for exactly the same reasons and I use the same layering (I got mine in a sale too) - brilliant piece of kit.


Thanks for the replay .. Iíll have a look at the jacket..

DaveLansdell

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Re: Weather prof jacket
« Reply #10 on: 21:09:36, 22/09/20 »
When you say as an extra layer, do you mean something to sling over the top of everything else (including possibly a wet waterproof) for extra warmth at a lunch stop or an extra mid-layer to wear while walking?

For the former in winter I carry a reversible jacket made by Berg and stuffed with lots of Primaloft Silver insulation that I picked up cheap from Sports Pursuit about 4 years ago. The outer withstands light drizzle but even if it gets soaked it still adds useful extra warmth. Since I bought it the trend seems to be for new fancy synthetics that mimic down more closely by being in lots of little bits, but this has a sheet of insulation inside it. It's not as warm as it was, I think the insulation has degraded somewhat, but it's still useful. Lots of companies do this sort of jacket and as they're not the in thing they tend not to be too pricey.

For a mid-layer I love my Rab Alpha Flux jacket, which again I picked up in a sale. Not at all sure it would be worth the full price but I do find it works brilliantly at wicking the sweat away and keeping me just the right temperature as I go up and down hill. It's a snug fit, in summer I wear it over a wicking t-shirt, in winter over a thermal base layer. I wore it in the Brecon Beacons in the snow over a thermal base layer and that was warm enough while I was walking uphill. When I need more, I add my waterproof or softshell, and if I'm stopped I add the insulated coat.


Iím looking to reduce weight, while staying warm and dry.. think layering up with fleece. Than berghaus with a soft shell for warmth and sting dry ..
Some great tips there .. thanks
« Last Edit: 21:14:27, 22/09/20 by DaveLansdell »