Author Topic: 2020, the wild camping year. What have we learned?  (Read 2884 times)

Little Foot

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Re: 2020, the wild camping year. What have we learned?
« Reply #30 on: 14:50:33, 25/09/20 »
WHAAAT :o :tickedoff:  or who on earth gave you that idea >:(


The many Youtube vids of women failing badly at parking, and my ex's mum closing her eyes whilst driving through tight spots, and my son's nanna telling me how bad she is, and the countless times I've seen a driver mess up when with my dad and he says 'I bet it's a woman' and it is, plus the times he doesn't say anything and it's still been a woman. Oh and the fact I'm rubbish at it too. Guessing you are one of the exceptions though Jac, which there are some of course.


Funny how quick Richard got his defence in there!

Jac

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Re: 2020, the wild camping year. What have we learned?
« Reply #31 on: 14:58:57, 25/09/20 »
Perhaps it's genes - not gender

NB I didn't say I was a particularly good driver - just don't believe that men in general are better - even if they may think they are.
So many paths yet to walk, so little time left

Little Foot

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Re: 2020, the wild camping year. What have we learned?
« Reply #32 on: 15:13:39, 25/09/20 »
Perhaps it's genes - not gender

NB I didn't say I was a particularly good driver - just don't believe that men in general are better - even if they may think they are.


I think perhaps I should have said that they pick it up better.

ninthace

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Re: 2020, the wild camping year. What have we learned?
« Reply #33 on: 16:05:59, 25/09/20 »

That looks interesting, something my boy would like to explore.


Gunnerside first got my interest at the beginning of this month, when I flicked over the calendar and saw this pic:-




You can just see the peat drying structures at the top of the hill.

That looks like the Old Gang Smelting Mill - GR NY 97438 00532.  Not exactly near Gunnerside but you can walk there from Gunnerside.  Access from the road would be up the track from the layby (SD 98973 99837) just S of Surrender Bridge to the E.  There is an old adit there too to amuse your lad and if you walk on up the track to Flincher Gill (fork  right where the C2C path joins from the W) there are 2 adits side just to the right of the track.  The track E all the way from Gunnerside Gill to Surrender bridge has a lot of industrial archaeology.
If you want another voyage of discovery, if you follow the path from the Tan Hill Inn to Annaside Edge and Punchard Gill, there are some drystone coal mine shafts (now neatly covered with a grill) that  have been sunk through the peat.  You can see the stream running through the bottom of the shaft.  Further on is the old coal mine at Punchard Gill where coal used to be floated out on barges and then carried off down the hill.
Solvitur Ambulando

Little Foot

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Re: 2020, the wild camping year. What have we learned?
« Reply #34 on: 19:04:48, 25/09/20 »
That's definitely the spot! Fantastic work there Ninthace. That looks doable if I get a train to Richmond then walk to Reeth before heading to the mines. A bit more easier than I thought. Looks good for wild camping too at various locations. There does seem to be a fair bit that might interest my lad, hopefully.


I've just spotted Ravenseat Farm too if I carried on a bit, I think I would cry if I spotted the family there. I love the tv programme 'Our Yorkshire Farm'. They are all so lovely. I'm rather excited now as think that might be my first proper wild camp up there.

richardh1905

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Re: 2020, the wild camping year. What have we learned?
« Reply #35 on: 19:07:49, 25/09/20 »
Funny how quick Richard got his defence in there!


 ;D


Strange how I felt the need to quickly distance myself from your assertion!
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richardh1905

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Re: 2020, the wild camping year. What have we learned?
« Reply #36 on: 08:50:36, 26/09/20 »
Well, the one thing that I have learnt in the year of Coronavirus is to go for it, as we don't know what is around the corner.


All too often I've dithered because of an unfavourable forecast, easily put off by a shower symbol on the weather map; now unless a real storm is forecast, I go for it anyway. Once or twice I have paid the price, especially being caught by that giant thunderstorm a month or so back (but I was in a safe spot, and enjoyed a sublime wild swim the following morning), but it is all good experience, builds confidence and gives a store of memories that I shall cherish in years to come.  :)



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gunwharfman

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Re: 2020, the wild camping year. What have we learned?
« Reply #37 on: 16:07:24, 27/09/20 »
My adapted hiking quilt is back with me, its taken a while to return to me. I wanted to find a quick and easy way to keep warm, or warmer, during the colder months of the year when camping or bivvying. I had an old down sleeping bag and my wife's friend has cut it to size and has made it into a rectangular 'throwover' for me.

My plan is to 'toggle-attach' the 'throwover' along one side of my quilt. I wiil either be rolled up or just scrunched it up alongside me ready for use inside my bivvy or inside mky tent. If I wake up in the night feeing cold all I have to do is pull the 'throwover' over me, thereby creating a double-layer quilt and hope this is just enough to keep me going until dawn. The idea is that if I then get too hot I can just throw off the 'throwover' and push it to one side again. Well thats the plan, I've just got to camp out (in the garden first) to see if it will work in the way that I want it too?