Author Topic: Soaked through to the skin  (Read 1761 times)

gunwharfman

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #30 on: 16:58:52, 13/10/20 »
The way I protect my eyes is to use a 2.99 pair of wrap-around clear sunglasses from Decathlon. They are very good but I have to be careful because they can scratch easily if they fall onto the tarmac. I wear them when I run off-road as well, very useful all-rounder.

forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #31 on: 18:05:44, 13/10/20 »
Had a similar experience a few days ago, air temp of 1-3C on an exposed ridge in the early hours with highs in the valley forecast for 7C that day with light rain.  The colder temps and wind blown heavy rain developed into mixed wet rain/flurries coming in at 20-25mph made quite the difference and gave a wind chill of -5C, with the rain I was being chilled fast.  I'm sure most of us can recognise that decision point: when you consider your route, figure out whether you need to adjust plans as your hands are hurting from the cold or whether you'd rather head back.  In some ways I find these conditions more challenging than when you have snow and ice as you're losing temperature far faster due to rain, making the need to make good decisions more immediate.


In my case it was because I was still in my light three season kit and knew the only solution to not having enough kit with me to keep warm was either to turn back or push harder and generate that heat myself whilst relying on the improving forecast/the day warming up to 'kick in' and help warm me up throughout the day.


After that though, decided it's time to throw two sets of gloves back in my pack, pull out the warm fleece and make sure I consider taking the flask on the more brisk days, something I never bother with most of the time.


Problem with Buffalo kit in the UK is it's 160 for 1 layer you can't modulate, and without a hood it's useless (imo) which they charge you 30 for.  It's good equipment but it thrives in cold and stable weather systems where you can wear one layer all day and get on with it.  The trousers/salos are worth it though.

ninthace

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #32 on: 18:50:34, 13/10/20 »
A little trick I discovered by accident is to wear a ski mask when walking into the rain and suchlike. Its amazing how even a thin layer takes the pain out of ploughing into driving rain.
Back to my favourite bit of kit, my Tilley Hat.  Just rake it down into the wind and it keeps most of the weather out of your face and with both stays down, it stays on. 
Solvitur Ambulando

forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #33 on: 11:43:03, 14/10/20 »
Back to my favourite bit of kit, my Tilley Hat.  Just rake it down into the wind and it keeps most of the weather out of your face and with both stays down, it stays on.


Is that if you size it down two sizes and apply superglue to the rim first? 

BuzyG

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #34 on: 11:47:18, 14/10/20 »

Is that if you size it down two sizes and apply superglue to the rim first?


 ;D Don't know about Tilly hats. I have lost a couple of Beanies in high winds, when both hands have been busy scrambling up ridges.  That's when the versatility of a buff helps. O0

ninthace

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #35 on: 13:30:26, 14/10/20 »

Is that if you size it down two sizes and apply superglue to the rim first?
Absolutely not.  A gentleman instinctively knows how to size and wear a hat correctly.  The fore and aft retaining loops help, though it has to be really bad before I need the aft strap.  In fact, it has to be quite blowy before I wear the loops at all.  For example, today was quite blustery, enough to fold the leading edge of the brim, but I did not require a chin stay.  I can recall doing a very passable imitation of an Australian soldier in a side-on gale on the top of Whernside but it stayed on.
Solvitur Ambulando

BuzyG

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #36 on: 00:17:55, 15/10/20 »
Absolutely not.  A gentleman instinctively knows how to size and wear a hat correctly.  The fore and aft retaining loops help, though it has to be really bad before I need the aft strap.  In fact, it has to be quite blowy before I wear the loops at all.  For example, today was quite blustery, enough to fold the leading edge of the brim, but I did not require a chin stay.  I can recall doing a very passable imitation of an Australian soldier in a side-on gale on the top of Whernside but it stayed on.


Seems you are not alone.  I exchange greetings with a fellow in a Tilly hat whist out on this evening's walk.

gunwharfman

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #37 on: 19:06:56, 15/10/20 »
Since reading all of the comments I decided to check my stock of wet weather clothing, boots and hats. I have so many choices on offer, ranging from an expensive waterproof jacket to a cheap waterproof jacket, and a cheap waterproof long coat. No waterproof leggings for me but I do have three rain skirts, two homemade and one 10 cheap purchase. The 10 cheap purchase is the best. I have two pairs of waterproof gaiters, one ankle pair and one full length and I have two waterproof hats, plus two cheap ponchos and one expensive poncho. I have one pair of waterproof full leather boots and one pair of 'waterproof' fabric type boots which in reality, leak! They are being assessed by Sportshoes.com at the moment.

My combination choices are substantial but confusing, so much so I have no idea now which combination works best to keep me dry.  ;D

In case I still get wet even after wearing my wet weather gear, I have a backup plan, my hiking trousers are very quick drying as is my underwear and hiking shirts. What I don't own yet is an equally quick drying baselayer. I have a reasonably quick drying baselayer but thats it.

This little exercise even surprised myself.

thomasdevon

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #38 on: 20:35:29, 15/10/20 »
The last two trips to Dartmoor have left me drenched to the skin. However, the only point at which I got cold was when I stopped to heat up some food. This took so long I got a little cold, but not so bad I would need to re-plan. If i had been out camping I would have got into my nice sleeping bag and been none the worse for the day.


My feet and hands were soaked through my boots and gloves due to the bad ground and rain but they stayed warm enough. I'm not finding this drenching problem a problem I need to solve yet.

BuzyG

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #39 on: 20:49:07, 15/10/20 »
Since reading all of the comments I decided to check my stock of wet weather clothing, boots and hats. I have so many choices on offer, ranging from an expensive waterproof jacket to a cheap waterproof jacket, and a cheap waterproof long coat. No waterproof leggings for me but I do have three rain skirts, two homemade and one 10 cheap purchase. The 10 cheap purchase is the best. I have two pairs of waterproof gaiters, one ankle pair and one full length and I have two waterproof hats, plus two cheap ponchos and one expensive poncho. I have one pair of waterproof full leather boots and one pair of 'waterproof' fabric type boots which in reality, leak! They are being assessed by Sportshoes.com at the moment.

My combination choices are substantial but confusing, so much so I have no idea now which combination works best to keep me dry.  ;D

In case I still get wet even after wearing my wet weather gear, I have a backup plan, my hiking trousers are very quick drying as is my underwear and hiking shirts. What I don't own yet is an equally quick drying baselayer. I have a reasonably quick drying baselayer but thats it.

This little exercise even surprised myself.


You introduce an interesting dilemma here.  Though not one for myself at the moment.  For a day walk I choose from the multitude of coats trousers and layers and pick a set based on the conditions forecast for that day.  But what do yo do on a multiday walk. Warm sunny day I like to wear a white cotton tee shirt, If I'm too hot the sweat stays in it and keeps me cool.  On a cooler day I wear a synthetic base layer. If I sweat it wicks away and keeps any mid layers dry. So what to take on a 4 week trek?
« Last Edit: 21:03:52, 15/10/20 by BuzyG »

Gadabout Bounder

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Re: Soaked through to the skin
« Reply #40 on: 13:19:10, 23/10/20 »
As a business I work in all weathers, have to get on with the work and extremes aren't the clients problems.


Walking gear is as good as can be bought but work waterproofs have let me down.


In Essex over two days, torrential persistent rain wet to the skin - no fun if you can't get out of it, 15 metres up in a cherry picker.


In Leighton Buzzard an all day downpour, same outcome.


A search on hydrostatic heads and waterproof clothing.


Event (I believe) has (for their 'best' wear) 30 000mm of HH.


Goretex 28 000mm of HH.


I'm sure these figures can be debated but this post is about a jacket bought with a 20 000mm HH that I would never have even looked at.


Trespass mens Oswalt


https://www.amazon.co.uk/Trespass-Oswalt-Jacket-Black-Large/dp/B08BXB4Z2L/ref=sr_1_5?dchild=1&keywords=waterproof%2B20000%2Bmens%2Bjackets&qid=1602661666&sr=8-5&th=1&psc=1


Got the chance to try this jacket out on Wednesday in Cardiff.




Quite probably the worst wet weather I've ever worked in, elevated at 40 feet on the side of a Tesco Extra, work waterproof trousers are - Vass bib and braces, put the jacket on, safety harness on (so added pressure points around the jacket) and worked from 3 till 10pm.


Hard hat sorted out no wet head,, the water ran onto the jacket, no ingress into the neck area or into the wrist/sleeve area.


The rain did not stop and went from heavy rain to persistent hard rain, continuous.


When the works were eventually finished, moving the cherry picker from the main entrance/exit road, moving the diversion, packing equipment away it was midnight.


Jacket off - dry!!


I was shocked.


It's billed as breathable but no chance under the circumstances and there was some damp but certainly not wetness on the inner.


What's the work - building cleaning, pressure washing, water coming at me from all directions.


Forensic would be an understatement when I'm looking for equipment or anything else, purchases take days and it was the same to purchase this jacket.


Because the jacket performed so well the waterproof trousers were ordered, tried on and sent straight back - anyone who remembers the 70's will know about bell bottom trousers.


Might get wet every single day but I don't want to look like a 70's throwback doing it.


A great jacket that it has been difficult to find without paying Goretex/Event pricing. Other than setting a hose on yourself and a second one sideways onto front or back there can't be a more extreme test of a jacket.



'We've spilt the same blood in the same mud'