Author Topic: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...  (Read 3487 times)

gunwharfman

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #60 on: 09:42:54, 22/10/20 »
I forgot to mention when I typed 'off like a rocket' it was because I had to scamper up the grassy bank behind the cows and then turn right to the safety of a stile to get away from them. I created my own predicament because I didn't bother to look at my map as I entered the field and just assumed that the path went down the bank to the gate. If I'd kept to the top of the field and had just walked from left to right I wouldn't have met any cows.

barewirewalker

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #61 on: 11:30:56, 22/10/20 »
Shame on you GWM, I think the lady in the front is asking you to give her right ear a good scratch.

Look like dairy followers so probably very low risk and just friendly. If herdmen were encouraged as part of Public Relations, which all other business have to spend time and resources on, to print information about the livestock in a field, perhaps there would be less false news floating around and better information to base understanding.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

Murphy

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #62 on: 17:10:09, 22/10/20 »
Apart from my own personal serious experiences of cattle resulting in injury which has been discussed on this Forum previously, I guess listening to Jeremy Vine on BBC radio 2 today - phone in on dangers of cattle in fields with public rights of way, the discussion around the potential for diverting a path where 4 individual incidents of persons being injured by cattle took place recently, and the number of individuals phoning in about their injuries or near misses with cattle.   I imagine anyone lisening may have had their attitude towards cattle shaped accordingly!

Jac

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #63 on: 09:29:46, 23/10/20 »
........   I imagine anyone lisening may have had their attitude towards cattle shaped accordingly!
and unfortunately their resulting nervousness could exacerbate problems
So many paths yet to walk, so little time left

WhitstableDave

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #64 on: 13:02:18, 24/10/20 »
Further to my photo in the first post...



...I think the safest way to deal with the issue is to wait until autumn when the herd has moved indoors!  :)



(Photo from this morning's short walk with the boys. BTW, the 'warning' sign is a permanent fixture.  ::))

ninthace

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Solvitur Ambulando

gunwharfman

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #66 on: 14:54:21, 24/10/20 »
Not for me thankyou! Another problem with cows is if you are unlucky enough to have one breath directly in your face!

Deolman

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #67 on: 09:19:18, 03/11/20 »
As a solo walker I am wary of cattle and will try to avoid crossing a field where they are present if at all possible. The main reasons cows may take an interest in you was explained to me by a dairy farmer on one of my walks. Apparently cows are short sighted and very curious so if they see something moving across the field they will quite often want to take a look. It only needs one to start waking towards you and then the rest will follow. If you try to run then they will also run to catch up with you. On the numerous occasions this has happened to me I have stuck to a steady pace and just kept a close eye on them and if they got too close I would turn and shout at them which made them keep their distance. Because of their poor eyesight they are very much attracted by bright objects hence why I no longer wear my bright red top! On a recent encounter I had a bunch of young bulls following me. When they lost interest they ran off except for one who seemed very interested in my walking pole. After holding it out to him he had a good sniff then, curiosity satisfied, ran off to join his pals.

barewirewalker

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #68 on: 10:19:11, 03/11/20 »
You were given good advice by that farmer, but young bulls are rare, normally you will meet Bullocks, these have been castrated. If we learn to use the correct terminology it will perhaps help to lessen the myths that build up around the real instances of aggressive animals.

The unnecessary warning of a permanent sign that bears no relevance to present risk, should be commented on. At the least, it is a sign of lazy land management and too often a sign of latent hostility.
I once found a Beware Bull sign on the gate of a barley stubble field with a volunteer potato plant on the  field headland. At a minimum rotation, after grass, would suggest 5 if not 6 years since there had been a bull in that field.


The OP is giving a useful insight into the mixed messages visitors are getting from the occupiers of our countryside. Not enough educational input is going into the agricultural colleges about access; Farmers cannot continue to rely on the excuse that they they work harder and longer hours, therefore these small items of bad management are excusable.


These signs of bad manners and latent hostility are a result of the Farmer deferring to the Landowner interest in matters of land management, because of the conflict over subscriptions. More research should be going into public access and the results used to train young farmers and stockmen to respect their customers, when they visit their places of food production.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

Deolman

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #69 on: 10:45:42, 03/11/20 »
You were given good advice by that farmer, but young bulls are rare, normally you will meet Bullocks, these have been castrated. If we learn to use the correct terminology it will perhaps help to lessen the myths that build up around the real instances of



As I am more interested in getting away from a herd of cattle safely than I am in taking a close look at their nether regions I am unable to verify if they were young bulls or bullocks - not sure if knowing would make any difference to the situation😀


« Last Edit: 17:52:36, 03/11/20 by Deolman »

BuzyG

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #70 on: 14:09:38, 03/11/20 »
You just have to learn to love them!
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/nurturing-resilience/202001/cuddle-cow-the-new-psychotherapy


You are coming up with some corkers in the reference department recently Ninthace.  Is it chucking it down outside?  O0

ninthace

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #71 on: 14:36:03, 03/11/20 »

You are coming up with some corkers in the reference department recently Ninthace.  Is it chucking it down outside?  O0
Rain is  off and on.  I have had my walk for the day and I have run out of models to build.  The three I have ordered haven't arrived yet, the housework is done, the garden is too wet to work on and I am B-O-R-E-D.
Solvitur Ambulando

Bourneendboy

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #72 on: 17:39:52, 03/11/20 »
We have some friends that run a dairy farm and some others whose family have a farm and breed cows. Both have said in the past to always be very cautious of cows when walking through fields and never to enter if they have calves.
If the cows do approach, usually they are just being inquisitive, make yourself as large as possible and clap your hands and they should move away.
I will always try and avoid entering a field of cows if poss and always look for a quick exit if they spot me ;D

Toxicbunny

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #73 on: 20:08:41, 07/11/20 »
I am wary of any cows , dairy or bullocks. I know different breeds. They say certain breeds have a nice temperament and that's like saying all dogs are nice.  If cows are too close to a stile or the field is too big with no fast exit point I will go another route. The problem is cows associate people with food and once one runs they all follow. The farmer who lives near me is now retired he told me never trust a cow and never turn your back on one. I do think some legislation should be brought in however with cows and wild horses on ROW.

Dodgylegs

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Re: Factors that may shape our attitudes towards cattle...
« Reply #74 on: 22:13:45, 07/11/20 »
My relation, a farmer, has installed an electric fence between edge of his field and ROW, to avoid any incidents. He is fortunate that the ROW comes down the side of his land and not across.