Author Topic: Slow Maps  (Read 1875 times)

MarkT

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Slow Maps
« on: 08:03:34, 16/10/20 »
I saw an article on the news this morning regards a new scheme to produce a new/different kind of map for walkers. The idea being is to try and show the best/safest "walking" routes linking Britain's main towns and they are looking for volunteers.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-54562137


An interesting idea which I am sure will benefit a lot of people and hopefully prevent us following some so called paths which are no longer there, over grown with shrubbery or take you across dangerous roads.


There is a link at the bottom of the article for those who are interested.

cornwallcoastpathdweller

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #1 on: 08:51:56, 16/10/20 »
I saw an article on the news this morning regards a new scheme to produce a new/different kind of map for walkers. The idea being is to try and show the best/safest "walking" routes linking Britain's main towns and they are looking for volunteers.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-54562137


An interesting idea which I am sure will benefit a lot of people and hopefully prevent us following some so called paths which are no longer there, over grown with shrubbery or take you across dangerous roads.


There is a link at the bottom of the article for those who are interested.


Just found this as well.  Looks like a fantastic idea to me, shall be having a good look through the site over the weekend. 
one step then another then another then a bench - please?

sussamb

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #2 on: 10:24:25, 16/10/20 »
Signed up to help  O0
Where there's a will ...

BuzyG

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #3 on: 10:49:10, 16/10/20 »
Great idea, I was surprised how difficult it was to find safe routes out of Saltash to the surrounding villages and towns when I tried.  A number of times I've had to walk along A roads, actually on the tarmac or very close along side on a thin verge.  That worked during lock down, but those routes are now once again too dangerous, due to traffic.  I'll have a proper read over the weekend. O0

jimbob

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #4 on: 10:55:34, 16/10/20 »
Great idea. I have signed up.
 O0
Too little, too late, too bad......

ninthace

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #5 on: 12:32:57, 16/10/20 »
I had a read of the site and I saw the story on the TV.  It is an interesting intellectual exercise but I think it has a limited practical application.  It is mapping journeys very few people would want to undertake, especially those of us that live in rural areas.
« Last Edit: 12:36:39, 16/10/20 by ninthace »
Solvitur Ambulando

pdstsp

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #6 on: 13:14:17, 16/10/20 »
I think the idea is that more of us might if it was viable.  I've signed up.


As to the rural dwellers - a quick google suggests 80% of us live in towns and cities.
« Last Edit: 15:14:07, 16/10/20 by pdstsp »

shortwalker

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #7 on: 13:27:42, 16/10/20 »
Sounds a great idea to me. Walking from one town/village to another, makes sense after all it was how footpaths started. For someone like me being able to get a train or bus to one town, walk to another and get a train bus back is great.


Know I know I could do it now, but having a route that has recently been walked as a guide will make it so much easier.


Simple example near me one of the routes I had planned to walk the other week went across the canal. Unfortunately the canal bridge is now in not in use (permanently in the open position) I could have gone down the next footpath, but have a guess the same thing. I know both bridges are not in use because I frequently walk the canal but if I hadn't that would have been a good mile+ wasted. (and for someone like me a mile is a long way)   

ninthace

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #8 on: 13:38:25, 16/10/20 »
How far is the average member of the public prepared to walk?  Is there a worthwhile destination within that distance?  How do they  get back?  Using public transport is not recommended at present so they will have to walk back which reduces the range by half until such time recreational use of PT is encouraged. Then we have the issue of ground conditions, crossing obstacles and livestock.
A walk to my local town would be at least a 25 mile round trip, probably more.  I have no reason to go there except to shop.  The best walks in my area are not village to village but circular walks, often not involving conurbations.
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Little Foot

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #9 on: 14:21:58, 16/10/20 »
Iím keen on any thing that helps people get out there and enjoy our countryside, but, shouldnít the focus be on making those problematic paths passable? I know there will be some that are too steep or too rocky for people, so it is good that walkers can be made aware of this, but a PROW that is too dense of vegetation or muddy? These pass should be made accessible and I would rather the councils clamp down on that so itís much easier for everyone to walk on paths they are entitled to be on. Signage should be a lot clearer too.


Even though it sounds like I am moaning, I actually think this project sounds very interesting and I will be keeping my eye on it for future trips. Hopefully it will help me avoid routes with stiles, when carrying a massive backpack.  ;D

pdstsp

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #10 on: 14:37:12, 16/10/20 »
Iím keen on any thing that helps people get out there and enjoy our countryside, but, shouldnít the focus be on making those problematic paths passable? I know there will be some that are too steep or too rocky for people, so it is good that walkers can be made aware of this, but a PROW that is too dense of vegetation or muddy? These pass should be made accessible and I would rather the councils clamp down on that so itís much easier for everyone to walk on paths they are entitled to be on. Signage should be a lot clearer too.



That's a good point, but there seems no reason why these things are mutually exclusive - in assessing a route, badly maintained paths can be communicated to the local council.  Of course whether they do anything is a different matter.


[size=78%]
[/size]How far is the average member of the public prepared to walk?  Is there a worthwhile destination within that distance?  How do they  get back?  Using public transport is not recommended at present so they will have to walk back which reduces the range by half until such time recreational use of PT is encouraged. Then we have the issue of ground conditions, crossing obstacles and livestock.
A walk to my local town would be at least a 25 mile round trip, probably more.  I have no reason to go there except to shop.  The best walks in my area are not village to village but circular walks, often not involving conurbations.


How far - I don't know, but plenty of people round here were out during lockdown pounding the pavements and fields, so there seemed to be a willingness to have a go.
Worthwhile destination - very subjective - for some this may be a look round a nearby town, or to visit a cafe.  I often walk locally when the forecast is crappy for the hills on a weekend.
Public transport - presumably the project is hoping one day we might be able to get back on the bus?
Ground conditions etc - this is what the project is designed to assess - safe and walkable and pleasant.  And it may identify issues with access too.
Your local walks - you live in the country, many don't.


I don't see a down side to this and I hope it gains traction.

Andies

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #11 on: 14:49:54, 16/10/20 »
Anything that increases awareness should be a good thing.
That said I have often found that there is no sensible "slow route" available in the existing ROW network. Should we therefore be looking for that logical route that maybe once existed but didn't find it's way onto the definitive map.
Where's BWW?

[size=78%] [/size]



ninthace

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #12 on: 15:47:26, 16/10/20 »

I don't see a down side to this and I hope it gains traction.
  Here is one.  The current enthusiasm for the project is a spin off from the restrictions on movement during the pandemic.  Already I have noticed that as freedom of movement has increased, the enthusiasm for walking for the sake of walking among the public at large has decreased. There is a real possibility that money will end up being spent establishing and maintaining a network of paths, many of which will be little trafficked because they do not lead anywhere anyone wants to go and, in so doing, the public funds available to spend maintaining other more worthwhile routes such as the current network of LDPs, will be reduced.
For me, it remains an interesting exercise, something anyone with a map could while away a few hours doing if they had the inclination.
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jimbob

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #13 on: 15:57:23, 16/10/20 »
Hi Ninthace, I know you like finding arguments befitting Devils Advocates, but correct me if I have totally missed the point. (And, since it is you, ;D even if I haven't) . I thought reading or misreading, you tell me, that they actually wanted feet on ground and not just eyes on maps whiling away dreamy hours.
Too little, too late, too bad......

pdstsp

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Re: Slow Maps
« Reply #14 on: 16:21:41, 16/10/20 »
Ninthace - you state a lot of stuff in there as if it is fact. 


You state you have noticed a drop off in walking since lockdown ended, however, by your own admission you are rural based while this project is linking urban areas - what evidence have you that walking in urban areas has dropped off?  I can say that in my urban area this is certainly not the case.


You state that money will be spent establishing and maintaining a network of paths which nobody will use.  How do you know this?  On what basis will money be spent, if there is nobody using or wanting to use the paths.  And, if the exercise identifies paths that may be of more interest to walkers, the money may be well spent. 


You also say that theses paths will go where nobody wants to go, but, again, how do you know nobody wants to go there until you let people know there is a walking route available which may be of interest?


You're not a member of the CLA trying to deny us all access are you?