Author Topic: Walking trainers  (Read 973 times)

Gadabout Bounder

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Re: Walking trainers
« Reply #15 on: 13:49:47, 23/10/20 »
You will find it is one of the great divides, those who do most of their walking in trainers and those who prefer boots.  I am moving increasingly into the trainers camp, I have salomons and scarpas, and both have proved pretty waterproof.  If you like walking in trainers you will probably find Altbergs a bit heavy.  My son, who I think has quite wide feet, is thrilled to bits with some Hanwags shoes, but he hasn't had them long enough to comment on how waterproof they are long term.


As someone with Hanwag boots and two pairs of Hanwag trainers I concur and have had them long enough to say they haven't let me down.


Trainers a little heavy but a worthwhile compromise.


An overlooked brand.
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Sean123

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Re: Walking trainers
« Reply #16 on: 14:00:49, 23/10/20 »
Ha ha ... funnily enough when I finished my walk last week and was feeling a little sore and tender, I walked past someone who was in flipflops! I'm not sure how far they walked but they were quite a distance from any carpark so I would imagine it was a good few miles they walked in them ... cant have been very conformable!

Sean123

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Re: Walking trainers
« Reply #17 on: 14:01:33, 23/10/20 »
Ha ha ... funnily enough when I finished my walk last week and was feeling a little sore and tender, I walked past someone who was in flipflops! I'm not sure how far they walked but they were quite a distance from any carpark so I would imagine it was a good few miles they walked in them ... cant have been very conformable!
For what it is worth Sean.  I once met someone doing the path in gumboots so it seems whatever you are happy with is the rule.

Sean123

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Re: Walking trainers
« Reply #18 on: 14:03:38, 23/10/20 »
I'll have a look at them thanks, I've sat on the fence and purchased a pair of Saloman trainers and a pair of boots for when the weather isnt as good!



As someone with Hanwag boots and two pairs of Hanwag trainers I concur and have had them long enough to say they haven't let me down.


Trainers a little heavy but a worthwhile compromise.


An overlooked brand.

cornwallcoastpathdweller

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Re: Walking trainers
« Reply #19 on: 14:52:47, 23/10/20 »
Thanks for all everyone's help, some really good advice and I'll do some research over them all. It's a bit of a minefield as there are so much choice! As I mentioned I ordered some SALOMON Men's Speedcross 4 Trail Running Shoes but they were just too narrow for me.

I'll keep on looking and see. I liked the idea of swapping between shoes and boots but we will be camping so trying to keep belongings to a minimum. I'll let you know how we get on!

We walked km near the Croyde area last week and have a walk planned for St Agnes next month so I'll let you know how I get on!!

Thanks again, everyone's help was much appreciated!


St Agnes is just a bit south of me at Newquay, you wont be wanting trainers around those parts as its quite rocky/stoney  O0
one step then another then another then a bench - please?

Dyffryn Ardudwy

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Re: Walking trainers
« Reply #20 on: 15:22:23, 26/10/20 »
Waterproof trainers, there's no such thing.

As soon as you encounter any bit of terrain, with long damp grass, the moisture will overpower any trainer, even a GoreTex lined model.

If your after trainer styled footwear, with a bullet proof grip on its sole, then consider a pair of Fell shoes, either by Inov8 or Salomon.

Walsh fell shoes, do not offer the best support for the foot, but most of the top trail runners, seem to go for Salomon footwear.


Donnie Campbell managed every single Scottish Munroe, even the Cullin Ridge, in a pair of Salomon trainers, so there must be some sense in wearing a trainer over heavier boots.

The only problem, is that they have become very expensive, for what is in effect a glorified trainer.

Some cost more than a really good pair of boots, but if its extreme comfort, and less weight for your feet to carry around, Salomon is the trainer of choice

Even then, they will not keep your feet dry, but the grip they will provide, on all surfaces is incredible.
« Last Edit: 15:40:02, 26/10/20 by Dyffryn Ardudwy »

BuzyG

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Re: Walking trainers
« Reply #21 on: 16:34:26, 26/10/20 »
Waterproof trainers, there's no such thing.

As soon as you encounter any bit of terrain, with long damp grass, the moisture will overpower any trainer, even a GoreTex lined model.

If your after trainer styled footwear, with a bullet proof grip on its sole, then consider a pair of Fell shoes, either by Inov8 or Salomon.

Walsh fell shoes, do not offer the best support for the foot, but most of the top trail runners, seem to go for Salomon footwear.


Donnie Campbell managed every single Scottish Munroe, even the Cullin Ridge, in a pair of Salomon trainers, so there must be some sense in wearing a trainer over heavier boots.

The only problem, is that they have become very expensive, for what is in effect a glorified trainer.

Some cost more than a really good pair of boots, but if its extreme comfort, and less weight for your feet to carry around, Salomon is the trainer of choice

Even then, they will not keep your feet dry, but the grip they will provide, on all surfaces is incredible.


Did Donnie do his Cullin ridge walks in mid winter?


I have nothing against light comfy foot ware, but every walk is different. On our summer Bodmin walk cornwallcoastpathdweller and I choose different foot ware, he shoes me boots.  I had my walking shoes in the car with me at the start point of the walk, I also knew where we were going that day.  I'm very happy that I choose the right foot ware for that particular walk, on that particular day, in those particular conditions.  To simply try to pretend that one item of foot ware is better regardless is just daft IMHO.

WhitstableDave

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Re: Walking trainers
« Reply #22 on: 17:16:01, 26/10/20 »
Something that is sometimes overlooked in discussions such as these, is the suitability of the sole for the intended purpose.

Sean specified that the shoes would be mainly for street walking and the coastal path in Devon...

...
Iím looking for something lightweight and waterproof as mentioned, mainly for street walking and the coastal path in Devon.
...

There are many differences between 'hiking/walking' and 'trail' shoes, one of which is the amount of tread that's in contact with the ground. I can only talk about shoes that I'm familiar with, so they're what I've included in the photo...



From left to right: Salomon Speedcross 4; Garmont 9.81; Salomon Sanford GTX; Merrell Cham 7.

The two on the left are trail (running) shoes and the two on the right are walking shoes.

The Speedcross has very little rubber in contact with the ground which, if tarmac or concrete, will cause the tread to wear down very quickly.

The Garmont has a little more rubber in contact with the ground, but the lugs are much more shallow and again, the tread will wear down quickly if worn on-road.

By contrast, the walking shoes have a lot more rubber in contact with the ground than either of the trail shoes. So, given that the requirement is for shoes suitable for "street walking", I'd definitely recommend hiking/walking shoes - unless, of course, money is not an issue!  :)
« Last Edit: 17:48:23, 26/10/20 by WhitstableDave »

BuzyG

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Re: Walking trainers
« Reply #23 on: 20:19:33, 26/10/20 »

On smooth roads shoes, with a good thick cushioning tread and comfy insole, will almost always be better.  O0


On the Devon coast path. One day walking shoes will be better, the next day boots may be better. 


For me boots cover all the bases and carrying a pair of shoes for when needed is no problem either.  ;)