Author Topic: In praise of urban walks  (Read 577 times)

shortwalker

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In praise of urban walks
« on: 14:24:47, 24/10/20 »
With more restrictions coming in, maybe it's time to look at doing some urban walks.


When I worked in London I found some great walks, that took me off the roads. I was down there when they first started building canary wharf, so lots of dockland to explore, with little gems like the Greenwich foot tunnel, leading to Greenwich Park.


As I commented on another thread there are some great places to walk in Liverpool/ Birkenhead area.


Anywhere that has a canal is always a source of a walk.


The other week, I dropped the daughters car off for a service and made it from one end of Keighley to the other using mainly "off road" footpaths. 

ninthace

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #1 on: 16:15:18, 24/10/20 »
When I wasn't firing neutrons into Greenwich Park, I used to enjoy mooching round both sides of the river in that area.  That was a bit pre Canary Wharf though.
Solvitur Ambulando

cahill

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #2 on: 17:59:51, 24/10/20 »
I've been walking in the Peak District today but also enjoy urban walking. Just great being alive and being outdoors.

Dovegirl

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #3 on: 20:47:58, 24/10/20 »
I'm a fan of urban walking.  In the winter I don't often go right out into the countryside and so urban walks are my staple during that season. 

I'm lucky, in Brighton and Hove, in having a good variety of urban/urban fringe walking from the door  -  the seafront, the clifftop and undercliff walkways, beautiful parks and woodlands, and the fringes of the South Downs.

Forager

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #4 on: 21:49:18, 24/10/20 »
My urban walks can take me to the City of Durham where walks along the river are very nice.

Dodgylegs

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #5 on: 00:04:48, 25/10/20 »
My urban walks can take me to the City of Durham where walks along the river are very nice.
I was having a slow walk along Durham's riverbanks towards Kepier Woods today when I met a couple just getting out of their car with their two lovely quiet dogs. They were a canny couple, walked with them along to old rifle range which had a few cows at the top of the field so we walked down towards river and along its banks... cows didn't bother us... until we went around the old rangers, young cows were standing on the path and a couple charged towards the dogs. At this point we turned and headed back, with one of these cows following so I stopped to allow this couple and dogs to get away. Unfortunately some of the other cows were standing with their young'uns on the path near the gate, again some of the young cows became agitated. Ummm these may have been the cows for recently trampling a walker nearby. On the way back, again along riverside path to avoid some cows, met a guy I hadn't seen for over 10 years, we stood and chatted in the pouring rain.

Forager

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #6 on: 06:36:02, 25/10/20 »
Hi Dodgylegs I also encountered this problem on a couple of occasions in the same area.

BuzyG

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #7 on: 09:35:54, 25/10/20 »
Can any one define an urban walk?  I think those mention thus far are more suburban.  Not that the defonition of type/area matters much. A good walk is a good walk. O0


One place we really enjoyed walking miles around last year was Singapore.  :)
« Last Edit: 09:40:52, 25/10/20 by BuzyG »

Forager

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #8 on: 09:39:15, 25/10/20 »
I agree BuzyG, it does not matter where you walk just get out there and enjoy it. O0

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #9 on: 12:02:08, 25/10/20 »
I think most cities have areas where good walks can be had. Aberdeen had quite a few parks and you can walk along the banks of the Dee and the Don. The beach is quite long and north of the Don is another 15 miles of beach. Donmouth nature reserve gives the opportunity of seals and sea birds diving into the sea for fish. A walk up to Tory battery gives a really good chance of seeing dolphins breaching around the harbour mouth. There canít be many cities in the UK where dolphins can be seen from the shore.


Since the office is closed and I am working from home, I donít get into Aberdeen now, but there are plenty or rural walks around the village.

Dodgylegs

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #10 on: 12:13:21, 25/10/20 »
I think most cities have areas where good walks can be had.


Certainly Newcastle is a good example of a large city with some brilliant walks, in fact you'd be hard to believe you were actually in a big city at times!
Somethings you might not have seen...







Nearby city of Sunderland has beautiful sandy beaches and lovely riverside walks.
« Last Edit: 15:05:01, 25/10/20 by Dodgylegs »

jimbob

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #11 on: 17:08:45, 25/10/20 »
Tynesude is "littered" with the old wagonways. The coonsil have a couple of leaflets on their whereabouts, some really good walks around the area a lot  obviously, ending up on the Tyne. I often go from the railway museum down to the Royal Quays and back as it is a good distance for me to keep to my daily walk target when I'm up home.
Google wagonways walks.
 
Too little, too late, too bad......

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: In praise of urban walks
« Reply #12 on: 17:16:20, 25/10/20 »
I have also seen an otter on the Don in Aberdeen. There is the disused Deeeside railway line that can be walked from Aberdeen into the countryside.