Author Topic: Wellingtons  (Read 702 times)

Marianne

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Wellingtons
« on: 14:24:38, 29/10/20 »
Hi All, well this weather just lately has made Tom and I drag out the wellingtons. We know that walking in wellies is a very bad idea and so in this case Iím talking about relatively short muddy trudges along canal banks and soggy footpaths. Iím okay for just a few miles in mine, but Tom not so much. He has wide calves, but more seriously endured months with plantar fasciitis earlier this year. Can anyone suggest a company that can offer good arch support and accommodate a wider fitting to safely pull on those wellies in times of need?! I have heard of a company called Ruddís but thought Iíd throw open my query to you to see what you might suggest ... thanks, Marianne

jimbob

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #1 on: 14:58:01, 29/10/20 »
Waterproof boots and quality gaiters. You can put good insoles into boots very easily (I use superfeet, as ever, the choice is personal ). The gaiters can impede water ingress in the hole at the top of the boots and keep trouser legs clean and dry.Oh and they stop ticks crawling up your legs, but I suffer from tick paranoia.
 
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Birdman

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #2 on: 15:15:04, 29/10/20 »
On the Kungsleden in Sweden I met quite a few Swedish hikers on wellies (multi-day, carrying weight). I don't know how they do it but it works for them! Or perhaps they have special ones there? Who knows... At least they will have dry feet.
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NeilC

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #3 on: 15:53:41, 29/10/20 »
I've wondered what those leather wellies are like for walking, like the Toggi Quebec ones:https://www.equinesuperstore.co.uk/quebec-country-boot.html


Have a membrane so breathable. I'd guess that if they fit well and you break them in, they are good option for a day's walk in wet conditions.

 

Marianne

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #4 on: 16:28:53, 29/10/20 »
Thanks everyone so far - itís the plantar fasciitis thatís the main concern, not mud. But your thoughts are interesting and given some leads for research ....

ninthace

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #5 on: 16:31:43, 29/10/20 »
I have seen a man doing the SWCP i wellies and I once saw a ypung lady on the top of Bowfell in July in pink wellies.  If it works, it works.  A good insert might help.  I use Sidas insoles in my shoes and boots.  They make all kinds for all needs https://www.sidasfootcaresolutions.co.uk/sidas-insoles
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forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #6 on: 16:42:32, 29/10/20 »
Thanks everyone so far - itís the plantar fasciitis thatís the main concern, not mud. But your thoughts are interesting and given some leads for research ....


I use neoprene lined Hunter wellies with ortho insoles - Sorbothane are quite cheap and cheerful but if his PF is bad then I'd get them custom made.  Obviously it's a few quid but your mobility is priceless in my opinion.


Walking boots should inherently give better support and a good shop can help you fit around the PF problem, and 100% gaiters help, wash them down with a hose-pipe - but obviously if you're going through muddy conditions very frequently then good wellies are great.

shortwalker

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #7 on: 16:45:18, 29/10/20 »
A lot of farmers and construction workers, trudge around fields all day in wellingtons. So can't be all bad. I had to get a higher instep made for one of my staff at a local cobblers. Might be worth giving a couple a try. 

kinkyboots

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #8 on: 17:04:12, 29/10/20 »
I would refer you to the advice I offered you in an earlier post back in March http://www.walkingforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=39944.msg570472#msg570472

Unless or until you get some professional help the condition will continue and wellingtons regardless of make or model is not the right direction or answer.

gunwharfman

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #9 on: 18:59:28, 29/10/20 »
You might want to have a look at 'Outdoorgearlab' they have a whole section on winter boots and about hiking boots as well. Some items seem to be half and half between wellingtons and boots.

gunwharfman

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #10 on: 19:51:03, 29/10/20 »
Odd things wellingtons, for me from my upbringing, black wellingtons were always symbolic of our poverty and of being at the 'bottom.' Green ones however are seen by a lot of people as being very different. I'm sure Mrs. Bouquet would have bought Sheriden green ones!

clyoung

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #11 on: 21:07:43, 29/10/20 »
On the Kungsleden in Sweden I met quite a few Swedish hikers on wellies (multi-day, carrying weight). I don't know how they do it but it works for them! Or perhaps they have special ones there? Who knows... At least they will have dry feet.
Back at the end of the 80s, I went on a Guide and Scout Jamboree in Norway and the kit list said we needed wellington boots. Came as a bit of a surprise to find that we were expected to do a 24 hike in the mountains in them, camping out under the stars. When we saw the Norwegian "wellies" though it became clear that theirs were a much more fitted style than our boots and far more suitable for walking long distances in them.
I will never forget finding myself climbing a near vertical cliff in British wellies, albeit one probably only 5 or 6 metres high  :o

pauldawes

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #12 on: 05:58:21, 30/10/20 »
Many years ago one of my friends bought a pair of rubber boots...typical walking boot design but rubber rather than leather or fabric.


He said they were really comfortable and patently waterproof..and would have bought another pair when they wore out, but couldnít find any

richardh1905

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #13 on: 07:56:07, 30/10/20 »
Many years ago one of my friends bought a pair of rubber boots...typical walking boot design but rubber rather than leather or fabric.


He said they were really comfortable and patently waterproof..and would have bought another pair when they wore out, but couldnít find any


Interesting. I had a pair of lace up rubber boots years ago, insulated too - got them from a farm supplies shop.
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Birdman

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Re: Wellingtons
« Reply #14 on: 09:22:23, 30/10/20 »
Back at the end of the 80s, I went on a Guide and Scout Jamboree in Norway and the kit list said we needed wellington boots. Came as a bit of a surprise to find that we were expected to do a 24 hike in the mountains in them, camping out under the stars. When we saw the Norwegian "wellies" though it became clear that theirs were a much more fitted style than our boots and far more suitable for walking long distances in them.
I will never forget finding myself climbing a near vertical cliff in British wellies, albeit one probably only 5 or 6 metres high  :o


Interesting. If it works there, it should be good for places like Scotland too. A well fitted rubber boot with good soles and good support (like hiking boots) should be great for Scottish bogs.
My travel and walking reports: https://www.hikingbirdman.com/