Author Topic: Use of trekking poles  (Read 794 times)

Birdman

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #15 on: 19:23:10, 01/11/20 »
I like your list, I completely forgot about wet vegetation. I now use Pacerpoles I prefer them to my previous ones.


Never tried the Pacepoles myself, but I hear good comments about them. I think Chris Townsend is also a great fan of them.
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ninthace

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #16 on: 19:28:43, 01/11/20 »
I like your list, I completely forgot about wet vegetation. I now use Pacerpoles I prefer them to my previous ones.
  Another pacerpoles fan here.  They are superior in use to conventional poles and the carbon versions I have are really durable.  They have far outlasted any poles  have had before and apart from a few surface blemishes, they are as good as new.


I good technique with wet vegetation such as long grass or crop  is to bring the tips together in front of you near the ground and hold the grips wide to each side to form a V shaped plough.  As you advance it pushes off the worst of the water and folds the vegetation outwards.
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gunwharfman

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #17 on: 19:32:15, 01/11/20 »
I like the fact that I push down on them, rather than having to pull down as on my previous ones. Because of the handgrips, they are a bit bulky and cumbersome to secure to the side of my rucksack but they cause me no bother now because I am so used to them.

Birdman

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #18 on: 19:38:13, 01/11/20 »
The movement looks very natural. I have never seen them in any shop, so I have never had the opportunity to test how it actually feels walking with them.
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Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #19 on: 19:43:05, 01/11/20 »
I too have Pacerpoles and find them easy to use. It was very quick to learn to use them. The main learning point is synchronising movement of an arm with the opposite leg.


Ninthace, you will need to be careful with the carbon version, as carbon fibre poles donít like transverse force. This means they are not as effective with cyclists.  :D

ninthace

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #20 on: 21:28:31, 01/11/20 »
I too have Pacerpoles and find them easy to use. It was very quick to learn to use them. The main learning point is synchronising movement of an arm with the opposite leg.


Ninthace, you will need to be careful with the carbon version, as carbon fibre poles donít like transverse force. This means they are not as effective with cyclists.  :D
Yes, using the handle as a hook round the neck from behind keeps the forces longitudinal which is better for carbon poles.  They don't see it coming because they think they have already got you.  Once they are down, rubber bumper off the ferrule in a single fluid movement, reverse pole and to quote Cpl Jones " They don't like if up 'em"  The mud basket stops it going in too far but if you push hard enough...
Failing that, a simple thwack behind the ear with the heavy end reminds them of the basic courtesies.
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Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #21 on: 21:32:17, 01/11/20 »
Yes, using the handle as a hook round the neck from behind keeps the forces longitudinal which is better for carbon poles.  They don't see it coming because they think they have already got you.  Once they are down, rubber bumper off the ferrule in a single fluid movement, reverse pole and to quote Cpl Jones " They don't like if up 'em"  The mud basket stops it going in too far but if you push hard enough...
Failing that, a simple thwack behind the ear with the heavy end reminds them of the basic courtesies.
:D :D :D

shortwalker

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #22 on: 13:36:24, 02/11/20 »
Discovered another use for my poles this morning, moving leaves to help the water run away.

richardh1905

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #23 on: 14:25:57, 02/11/20 »
- Saving my knees on descends
- Help pulling myself up on steep ascends
- Extra points of contact really helps on slippery situations
- Crossing deep raging streams safely
- Probing the ground - How deep is the snow? How soft is the bog? Etc
- "Measure" how deep a step is when descending (I cannot see in 3D)
- Pushing (thorny) vegetation away
- Smashing the water out of wet bushes overhanging the trail, so I get 80% less wet
- Stirring the vegetation/ long grass in front of me to warn snakes that I'm passing through
- Prevented me from falling on my ass thousands of times!
- At camp, I use them as a stand to aim my solar panel nicely towards the sun
- Can be used to support certain tent features (for example make tent self standing)
- Possible weapon against animals attacking me


+ very useful for controlling my dog on a bungee attached to my waist. If I walk with the poles behind the bungee, the dog pulls me up hills nicely, but if I walk with a pole in front of the bungee, the dog is forced to walk behind me on that side - invaluable when descending.


I have found, however, that the poles are a real pain when scrambling, even when tackling a short easy section requiring a little 'hands on'.
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Birdman

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #24 on: 15:09:10, 02/11/20 »

I have found, however, that the poles are a real pain when scrambling, even when tackling a short easy section requiring a little 'hands on'.


Yes I agree. I usually collapse them then and attach them to my pack
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ninthace

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #25 on: 16:45:40, 02/11/20 »

Yes I agree. I usually collapse them then and attach them to my pack
Osprey packs are good for that - pole stowage that you can use without taking your pack off.
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BuzyG

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Re: Use of trekking poles
« Reply #26 on: 20:04:39, 02/11/20 »
Lordy me reading that was hard work.  Do they make reading poles.  :)


So basically they shift the workload from your lower body to your CV system and upper body, meaning you can push your knees just as hard as before whilst increasing the load on your heart and lungs. 


Short version.  If you are fit and balance the amount of load you place on your lower body with appropriate amounts of rest then your knees should last just as long with or without trekking poles.  The trick as with so many things, is not to over do it.  O0