Author Topic: Buying first hillwalking gear  (Read 3180 times)

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Buying first hillwalking gear
« Reply #60 on: 14:37:13, 15/02/21 »
I decided years ago not to expect dry feet with fabric boots over any distance greater than a few mile if the ground is sodden and wet grass with deep puddles is the norm .

Wet mud though , even if deep is not a problem for many boots , fabric or leather , as I find the water mostly stays where it is ..in the mud.
Persistant wet grass is the real test for any boots , even with gaiters .
All imho.. :)

PS : There is an interesting thread here about Gortex. Although a few years old I still think it is very relevant . Even now I still get updates when someone posts .

https://andrewskurka.com/waterproof-gore-tex-shoes-second-chance-complete-failure/
« Last Edit: 14:41:22, 15/02/21 by GinAndPlatonic »
Virtue is more to be feared than vice, because it's excesses are not subject to the regulation of conscience - Adam Smith

WhitstableDave

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Re: Buying first hillwalking gear
« Reply #61 on: 15:17:54, 15/02/21 »
Interesting article G&P, thanks.  O0

I agree with pretty much everything the writer says. In warmer conditions, waterproof footwear can be too warm; in prolonged wet conditions, feet will get wet in waterproof footwear; and waterproof footwear dries very slowly (whether back at home or on the trail).

That's why I now prefer to wear non-waterproof shoes. In fact, I did my only outdoors walk of the current lockdown a few days ago (when the ground was covered in snow and ice) in my totally non-waterproof HigherState Soil Shaker trail shoes and waterproof socks. At times, I was ankle-deep in icy water, yet my feet stayed perfectly dry.

Peak

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Re: Buying first hillwalking gear
« Reply #62 on: 16:32:54, 15/02/21 »
I now only wear my GTX boots/shoes when the weather is really bad, that's why they have lasted well. Trail shoes and a pair of Sealskinz just in case has been my preferred way for a few years now. I'm probably not alone in enjoying walking through dewy grass on a summer's morning and getting wet feet, by the end of the day shoes are dry and so are my feet.

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: Buying first hillwalking gear
« Reply #63 on: 16:52:36, 15/02/21 »
How do water proof socks feel . I have always imagined they would feel clammy and make feet sweat but maybe that is only when the weather is very warm .?

I have never really considerded them for that reason but I accept I could be totally misguided , I read what you say W Dave and Peak in singing their praises .  O0
Virtue is more to be feared than vice, because it's excesses are not subject to the regulation of conscience - Adam Smith

Peak

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Re: Buying first hillwalking gear
« Reply #64 on: 18:08:16, 15/02/21 »
G&P,
If you're thinking of getting waterproof socks I would advise reviewing other brands as the Sealskinz aren't for everyone. I have seen others reviewed that seem much better but can't remember the names. When I replace mine I will be looking elsewhere.

WhitstableDave

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Re: Buying first hillwalking gear
« Reply #65 on: 18:23:10, 15/02/21 »
How do water proof socks feel . I have always imagined they would feel clammy and make feet sweat but maybe that is only when the weather is very warm .?

I have never really considerded them for that reason but I accept I could be totally misguided , I read what you say W Dave and Peak in singing their praises .  O0

I feared that waterproof socks would be just as you say, but that hasn't been the case. I've worn them quite a few times and haven't really noticed anything different. I've got two pairs of Bridgedale Stormsocks: Medium weight (boot length) and Lightweight (ankle length).

In October, my wife and I both did the virtual London Marathon. It rained before and during the day so it was a very wet 26.2 miles. My wife ran her marathon on-road in waterproof socks in non-waterproof running shoes, while I walked mine off-road in waterproof socks and non-waterproof shoes (Merrell Cham 7). We agreed that the socks were a big success!  O0

gunwharfman

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Re: Buying first hillwalking gear
« Reply #66 on: 18:32:05, 15/02/21 »
I've worn my Berghaus Superlights a fair bit in the last three weeks (its been rather wet and the fields and footpath have been muddy and sodden) and they haven't leaked at all, which is nice.

Because I run every day my feet have been constantly wet for what seems an age. I have two pairs of off-road shoes but I just don't have enough time or the inclination to keep drying each pair every day so I just take the insoles out and dry them. The mesh at the toe areas are usually wet when I finish my run but by the morning the mesh has dried to just being damp so with dry inserts back in them I then run in almost dry shoes.

When the weather improves I'll switch to my 'new' Salomon Ulta X boots (the previous ones leaked and I sent them back) but I've decided if this pair leaks I'm just going to accept it and keep them. I just can't be bothered to go through the process of sending the shop photos, posting them off, and then waiting for a new pair to arrive. Except for the leaking issues I like these Salomon's boots a lot. I plan to use the same technique when I next hike, I'll take a spare pair of inserts plus an extra pair or two of socks with me, if the boots leak better to have half a wet boot than put my feet into a fully wet boot.

James M

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Re: Buying first hillwalking gear
« Reply #67 on: 03:28:10, 24/02/21 »
Wore the Altalights again for the 13 miles around Loch Leven. There were very wet and muddy unavoidable pools and shallow bogs and marshes that had gathered after the snow had melted and a few days of heavy rain. Was nearly ankle deep in mud and water to get passed. Needless to say my feet were almost soaking as the boots let in water from the side, top and the previously mentioned toe area. I have bought some Shoe Goo to try and seal the toe area and might try some spray on waterproofing for the other areas.


Sometimes I think I'm being unfair on the boots as it was probably wellies I needed for this type of weather, but they would also have leaked walking through some wet grass and that's just not right.


So I'll suffer these boots and until I can afford something better and the shops are open so I can try some on.

Looks like I can post pics now so here's a pic of almost exactly half distance around Loch Leven looking down the length of it


« Last Edit: 03:37:50, 24/02/21 by James M »

WhitstableDave

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Re: Buying first hillwalking gear
« Reply #68 on: 09:39:50, 24/02/21 »
Hi James

You might be interested in a test I wote about here: Tested: Bridgedale waterproof socks (with non-waterproof shoes!)

In conditions similar to those you describe, my feet stayed perfectly dry.   :)

gunwharfman

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Re: Buying first hillwalking gear
« Reply #69 on: 10:04:09, 24/02/21 »
Funnily enough, my wife has just thrown out my only pair of ordinary Bridgedale socks, a hole appeared in the toe area (the seam came apart) and she told me "not worth repairing." I said nothing.