Author Topic: Waterproof shoe covers  (Read 540 times)

gunwharfman

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Waterproof shoe covers
« on: 18:37:26, 15/11/20 »
I notice that there are loads of waterproof silicon shoe covers being sold online, have you ever bought a pair? If so, are they any good? Some are advertised as low has £7 a pair, including postage.

When I go camping I can think of two occasions when they might be useful? Not to use as shoe covers but to just slip on when, a) I wander from my tent to the shower area and back again b) if camping on grass, to slip them on when I get up in the morning and then, when ready, put on my socks and boots and c) to slip on if I have to get up and wander over to the toilet block in the night?

I don't think I would ever use them to slip over my boots or running shoes on a normal walking or running day unless of course I was kind to the proprietor and slipped then on when I wandered into a cafe or pub on a wet day?

I normally carry a pair of flip flops or lightweight shoes so if this is a good idea its also a weight saver as well.

BuzyG

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #1 on: 11:58:19, 16/11/20 »
Daft idea IMHO.  Extra weight, extra space, additional cost and your feet are still going to get wet if it's more than a bit damp.  Buy waterproof walking shoes. They do work and keep your feet dry, for shorter walks on mildly damp ground, without the extra weight, hassle or expense. ;)




Edit:  Above as some one who does not camp over night.  I can see where they could work as an addtion to your boots, as camp wear. (Carry on the comments on that one.)
« Last Edit: 12:03:34, 16/11/20 by BuzyG »

ninthace

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #2 on: 12:02:14, 16/11/20 »
Can't beat the feel of fresh dew between your toes in the morning!
Solvitur Ambulando

jimbob

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #3 on: 12:52:36, 16/11/20 »
Caught my interest. I looked up quite e few reviews. They do not seem as if they are actually fit for purpose insofar as there are too many people stating they were useless after a couple of wearings.

I have some extreme lightweight rubber things that are designed for surfboarders etc., good for camp shoes and overnight visits to the loos, main use is veruka protection in camp site showers.
Too little, too late, too bad......

gunwharfman

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #4 on: 13:36:10, 16/11/20 »
My need for such a waterproof slip-on comes about because of my age and how age affects my body. Although I feel healthy I'm not so supple as I used to be, so getting in and out of a one-man tent is a bit more difficult for me these days. In the 'old days,' my routine was to swing my legs out into my porch area and put on my socks and then boots and once done I stood up.

Last year, in particular, became more difficult and I found it was easier if I crawled out head first doggy fashion (with my flip flops on) and making sure that my knees didn't touch wet grass and then stand up. I would then look for a spot where I could sit or lean against and then put my socks and boots on. The problem with wearing flip flops is that I get instant wet feet and so have to remember to take my towel with me and dry them if I can. Putting socks on with wet feet can be difficult, the sock material doesn't slide anymore.

jimbob

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #5 on: 15:55:17, 16/11/20 »
Those surfboard shoe may just about meet your requirements GWM.

I know you will let us know if you find something suitable, I am interested because I'm in much the same situation as yourself.
Too little, too late, too bad......

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #6 on: 17:48:06, 16/11/20 »
Can't beat the feel of fresh dew between your toes in the morning!
... or fresh cow pats, if you havenít chosen your site carefully enough.

ninthace

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #7 on: 18:11:57, 16/11/20 »
... or fresh cow pats, if you havenít chosen your site carefully enough.
As a kid, I did once use a fresh pat as a chest poultice in a wheelbarrow race during a sports day.  Mum wasn't pleased!
Solvitur Ambulando

BuzyG

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #8 on: 18:19:14, 16/11/20 »
As a kid, I did once use a fresh pat as a chest poultice in a wheelbarrow race during a sports day.  Mum wasn't pleased!
Photos or it never happened, as my primitive Tiffy brain just folded up on that one., ;D ;D ;D ;D O0 

Birdman

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #9 on: 19:30:24, 16/11/20 »
OK, different subject, but it came to mind when I saw this topic... Showa 281 gardening gloves (£10) get rave reviews from some very experienced hikers/ adventurers for hiking in cold rainy/ snowy weather, especially when paired with proper liners. Grin I wish they had a different colour though...


My travel and walking reports: https://www.hikingbirdman.com/

Birdman

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #10 on: 19:41:35, 16/11/20 »
Ontopic: I struggle to see any usefulness in these shoe covers for camping or hiking.
My travel and walking reports: https://www.hikingbirdman.com/

gunwharfman

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #11 on: 20:02:07, 16/11/20 »
I decided in the end to buy a pair, only cost £4, so for me worth a look and a tryout.

As I wrote I can see three specific uses for them, all I think will be about how robust they are when in use?

Before I decided to buy I remembered some very wet and muddy sites I've stayed on over the years, especially that time when I decided to get out of my tent in bare feet, carrying my boots and socks with me to a bench, and having to walk over some acorns and their shells to get there. Very uncomfortable!

Birdman

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #12 on: 20:08:08, 16/11/20 »
I decided in the end to buy a pair, only cost £4, so for me worth a look and a tryout.

As I wrote I can see three specific uses for them, all I think will be about how robust they are when in use?

Before I decided to buy I remembered some very wet and muddy sites I've stayed on over the years, especially that time when I decided to get out of my tent in bare feet, carrying my boots and socks with me to a bench, and having to walk over some acorns and their shells to get there. Very uncomfortable!


I always just use my boots if it is very muddy. But, granted, they are more work to put on. Yeah, for £4 you can just see if they work for you.
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BuzyG

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #13 on: 00:14:16, 17/11/20 »
OK, different subject, but it came to mind when I saw this topic... Showa 281 gardening gloves (£10) get rave reviews from some very experienced hikers/ adventurers for hiking in cold rainy/ snowy weather, especially when paired with proper liners. Grin I wish they had a different colour though...





I've been wearing cheap gardening gloves over my 99p woolly gloves in cold conditions for as long as I can remember.  Currently have two pairs in the draw with my walking socks.  Works a treat and cost very little.  Not tried those though.  May have to get a pair.





Go for Brown. O0
« Last Edit: 00:18:51, 17/11/20 by BuzyG »

Birdman

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Re: Waterproof shoe covers
« Reply #14 on: 08:49:19, 17/11/20 »

I've been wearing cheap gardening gloves over my 99p woolly gloves in cold conditions for as long as I can remember.  Currently have two pairs in the draw with my walking socks.  Works a treat and cost very little.  Not tried those though.  May have to get a pair.





Go for Brown. O0


Cool! Apparently you are one of these experienced hikers who have figured this out long time ago. I never thought about using this type of gloves for hiking before, until I read about them a few weeks ago. Apparently some people hike the Rockies in them during blizzards. I have always struggled a bit with gloves because they are difficult to dry when wet, but this is a proper layered approach with the 'hardshell' not absorbing any water at all and the wool 'liners' are quick and easy to dry.


Another example where a cheap 'household' solution beats expensive high tech gear. Water bottles come to mind too. There is such a big range for sale in outdoor shops, but nothing beats a simple throw-away PET Smartwater bottle (or similar) that people throw in their garbage. I've been using the same one for years now, rescued from a garbage bin.
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