Author Topic: Winter and darkness  (Read 1134 times)

ninthace

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #15 on: 19:38:13, 19/11/20 »
Doesn't the DoE expedition not involve wild camping?  The Scouts also required the planning and execution of a hike with an overnight camp at one time, no idea if it still does.  That would require land owner consent.
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fernman

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #16 on: 20:07:51, 19/11/20 »
Out of interest, has any one here ever asked the land owner and been given permission to wild camp?

Responding to thread drift, yes, but it was many, many years ago when I was cycling with camping gear from London Borough of Hillingdon to Penmaenmawr. I got as far as Droitwich area on my first day, about 110 miles. Spotting a nice pasture near the road I went and knocked at the farmhouse beyond, and asked if I could camp in the corner of their field for the night. Permission was readily granted.

Even worse thread hijack: A sequel to the story is that I didn't have a watch and I got up when it was light in the morning. While I was getting ready a young woman passed, getting the cows in she said. On asking the time, I was told it was about 5:30.

April

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #17 on: 20:20:54, 19/11/20 »
For those who hike and camp in the winter months, how do you cope with the long hours of darkness?


I don't do solo winter camps, except with beefy, so it is entertainment all the way with him lol. Solo, I would take book, film, tv programme, music saved on tablet maybe, along with power bank to recharge?



"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

fernman

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #18 on: 20:25:43, 19/11/20 »
When you spend long nights in your tent with a torch, the lit-up tent really stands out in the landscape.

It's something I'm extremely conscious of, but it has very rarely bothered me during my wild camping in north Wales, where I usually walk in the less-visited parts that are also very sparsely populated. There have been a couple of exceptions (a notable one was pitching surrounded by hedges on the lawn of a bungalow for sale in the edge of a village) but when there are any dwellings scattered about, I find places where I'm out of sight of any windows no matter how far away they might be.

I like to think that no-one is going to want to leave his telly and the warmth and comfort of his home, and stumble some way across rough and boggy land in the cold and wet to go and investigate a dim green light coming from a tent in the far distance.

forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #19 on: 21:50:19, 19/11/20 »
It's something I'm extremely conscious of, but it has very rarely bothered me during my wild camping in north Wales, where I usually walk in the less-visited parts that are also very sparsely populated. There have been a couple of exceptions (a notable one was pitching surrounded by hedges on the lawn of a bungalow for sale in the edge of a village) but when there are any dwellings scattered about, I find places where I'm out of sight of any windows no matter how far away they might be.

I like to think that no-one is going to want to leave his telly and the warmth and comfort of his home, and stumble some way across rough and boggy land in the cold and wet to go and investigate a dim green light coming from a tent in the far distance.


Yeah this is generally my train of thought.  Camp high and out of the way - make it a chore for them to get out of bed and get to you.  THAT SAID - I've had a few farmers approach very early in the morning, a couple on quads and another one walking (he must have left his farm house at something like 4am).  Fortunately I pack up and leave early, but I'm always very wary of this when stealth camping, and will try to camp so I'll put the farm downwind of the camp site - dogs have a super sense of smell and even if you're quite a distance away this can cause issues.  I've heard a farmer on a quad late at night after his dogs started going crazy and it's quite disconcerting to be in a tent, not knowing what the disposition of that person might be.  Fortunately that was a one time event and I was tucked up in a dark tent in a terrain feature you'd have to physically stumble upon to see, but I've since camped high and well out of the way.

NeilC

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #20 on: 19:08:45, 20/11/20 »
Iíve camped all over the Lakes, Wales etc. nobody seems to care. I donít make a huge effort to be stealthy. I just donít camp near habitation.


All theyíre gonna do is ask you to move, which I would with an apology.

Stube

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #21 on: 15:52:34, 22/11/20 »
50/60 years ago, as a teenager, I wild camped regularly - there was no option since recognised "campsites" only accepted caravans. I asked the farmer for permission which was usually granted, but occasionally refused. In those days I lived on the edge of the Peak District.

These days I wild camp occasionally - when circumstances force me to - without asking the owners permission since in general it's impossible to determine who he is.Living as I as now do in the South of England on the coast wild camping is difficult - it's too crowded.




richardh1905

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #22 on: 17:52:16, 22/11/20 »
In non lockdown times, one word - pub.


Having said that, I'm quite happy to get into my sleeping bag early and read until I feel like dozing off. I quite like being alone with my thoughts from time to time.
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BuzyG

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #23 on: 18:32:39, 22/11/20 »
I would be interested to know whether folk walk on after dark much? Or do you always stop and set camp while there is sun light available?

Birdman

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #24 on: 18:42:01, 22/11/20 »
I would be interested to know whether folk walk on after dark much? Or do you always stop and set camp while there is sun light available?


I always try to set camp well before sunset. However, many hikers on the PCT hike long distances in the dark to avoid the desert heat. But I always found that a bit of a waste because you miss out on the scenery (though you may see some nocturnal animals - it can also be beautiful with a bright moon). In the dark, even with a decent headlight, I also find it quite difficult to find a decent camp spot because you cannot look very far and the ground is less easy to judge.
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forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #25 on: 14:11:59, 24/11/20 »
I would be interested to know whether folk walk on after dark much? Or do you always stop and set camp while there is sun light available?


If I'm hoping to get to a loch or some water source I'll usually keep going well into the dusk and pitch where I intended to pitch.  However I'll often look at the time a few hours before, realise I'll be arriving in the dark and just hoof it a little faster instead.


As for intentional walking in the dark, I prefer to start off in the dark in the early hours than finish in them.  Not sure if it's because I feel I'm happier with being at my most 'fresh' (usually after an early morning coffee) when I've got the greatest chance of a slip or fall due to darkness, or whether I just don't feel like my body ever relaxes and wants to fall asleep easily when I've made camp late at night.


It's worth making a habit of doing some nighttime walking when you hike though, even if it's just to keep your navigation fresh and allow you to be more confident if you need to stay out unexpectedly.

gunwharfman

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #26 on: 14:49:53, 24/11/20 »
I too prefer to set off in the dark or just after daylight when I can. I've never been able to lie in so when I wake I just get up.

I usually have some knowledge about when it's going to get dark so I use the hour beforehand to select my spot.

I've slept a few nights in my garden recently, it's hard enough to deal with 6-8hrs of darkness so I just haven't ventured out into the real world to do it.

I keep telling myself that it will soon be December 21st and I know that my mood and motivation will change rapidly from then onwards, even better when its January 2nd!!!

windyrigg

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #27 on: 15:23:38, 24/11/20 »
When working away from home I carried on with my evening hill walk after work as nights drew in through the autumn. Eventually I was setting off in the dark with a head torch. To be honest I stuck to routes I was familiar with, surprising how much natural light there is from the moon and stars, with frost or snow cover it was magical, turning ever trip into an adventure. Recommended  O0 

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #28 on: 18:40:04, 24/11/20 »
Having done both, I also prefer to start in the dark than finish in the dark. I would also prefer walking uphill than downhill in darkness.

BuzyG

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #29 on: 23:38:32, 24/11/20 »
Interesting, but not surprising that those who sleep out on the hills prefer to start in the dark and get the camp set up before dark.  Day walking I am seldom on the hills before daylight.  But often still out long after dark.  Or on occasion I walk through to dawn.

On crisp winter nights there is little I prefer more than looking up at the starts and the planets, from a sheltered dark sky spot out on the moors. One of these days I must get back to sleeping out in the hills.   O0