Author Topic: Winter and darkness  (Read 2130 times)

gunwharfman

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #30 on: 09:21:44, 25/11/20 »
An aside but last year when I went to La Palma and was at the highest point on the island I was truly amazed at the quality of the sky above. I just lay on my back in my bivvy and looked up, it was one those 'out of this world' moments.

BuzyG

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #31 on: 10:00:36, 25/11/20 »
Not out in the wild as such.  But I remember like it was right now, lying on top of my aft gun electronics unit, on the back end of HMS Illustrious in the 1980s, just staring up at the Aurora Borealis for nights on end during exercise North Star.  I was fascinated by the night sky before then, but since I just love it. From our loft there is much light pollution.  But from the middle of Bodmin moor there is virtually none. :)

richardh1905

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #32 on: 12:23:21, 25/11/20 »
I like to time it so that I have the tent up and am settling in as the sun is going down.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

thomasdevon

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #33 on: 09:10:48, 05/12/20 »
I've done night hikes on Dartmoor in wintertime, its OK on the north moor where there's the well known network of Army roads and old artillery tracks to follow. Solo and in groups. I would avoid going solo off-trail at night anywhere though, as well as fording.


Its a great training experience - everyone should try it. You see, I'm wondering how many hikers without a night hiking experience have made bad decisions on unsuitable routes and hurried descents just to get off the hill before night - once you've done it once, its not the risk you maybe thought.

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #34 on: 09:44:40, 05/12/20 »
I imagine navigation in darkness is much easier with gps devices and apps. I remember night hikes as a scout in the 1970s. On one occasion we were hiking in pitch darkness in the south of the Isle of Wight. Somehow we found ourselves in a field completely surrounded by cows and with electric fences all around us. Perception of depth and distances was definitely different. In the hills it can be more dangerous, even with head torches. My companion and I were descending in the dark after a whole day in the Glyders. We were hoping to get down to the valley in time for a pint before the pub at Nant Peris called last orders. On the descent he almost walked off a drop of about 10 feet that the path skirted around. We slowed down after that, but still managed to get a couple of pints in the Vaynol Arms.

gunwharfman

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #35 on: 09:54:42, 05/12/20 »
Only two weeks to go until the winter solstice, I love this day!

harland

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #36 on: 11:10:44, 05/12/20 »
I remember night hikes as a scout in the 1970s.
I remember them in the 60s, bet that they are not allowed to do them nowadays without supervision - if at all!

Bigfoot_Mike

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #37 on: 12:09:26, 05/12/20 »
I remember them in the 60s, bet that they are not allowed to do them nowadays without supervision - if at all!
I suspect there are a lot more restrictions about what kids are allowed to do. My brother and I used to disappear into woods and alongside streams and ponds for hours on end. The only admonition we had was “don’t talk to strangers”. In scouts we had a lot of autonomy while under canvas or bivouac or when hiking. We were expected to be responsible.

harland

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #38 on: 12:30:36, 05/12/20 »
At least we had our sheath knife for company - don't remember ever stabbing anyone!

windyrigg

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #39 on: 16:22:02, 05/12/20 »
Yes, I have to agree that when I was a child, we were much better armed !
Many of us had a pocket knife, most common would be ex WW2 Army. There would be a good distribution of catapults (with which a couple of us were lethal), home made bows and arrows, spears etc. Tomahawks would have been very cool but I don't recall any hand axes being  pressed into service.
Distribution of air rifles (usually a BSA .177) would have averaged about 1 per street. Lack of slugs was always a problem.
Surprisingly nothing ever seemed to go wrong! We were told to look after the younger ones and be home for tea then set loose in the countryside.

Peak

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Re: Winter and darkness
« Reply #40 on: 17:10:24, 05/12/20 »
Yes, I have to agree that when I was a child, we were much better armed !
Many of us had a pocket knife, most common would be ex WW2 Army. There would be a good distribution of catapults (with which a couple of us were lethal), home made bows and arrows, spears etc. Tomahawks would have been very cool but I don't recall any hand axes being  pressed into service.
Distribution of air rifles (usually a BSA .177) would have averaged about 1 per street. Lack of slugs was always a problem.
Surprisingly nothing ever seemed to go wrong! We were told to look after the younger ones and be home for tea then set loose in the countryside.
That just about sums up my childhood, I can relate to it all, good times.