Author Topic: Gloves  (Read 1193 times)

Shelley

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Gloves
« on: 13:43:21, 19/11/20 »
Can anyone recommend warm and waterproof gloves for simple hiking?

pauldawes

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1450
Re: Gloves
« Reply #1 on: 15:25:00, 19/11/20 »
Never  found any...


What a few have recommended on here (and I'm going to try this winter) is to buy some cheap nylon/ latex (or rubber) waterproof household gloves and slip over a pair of wool gloves if/ when rain starts.

ninthace

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7647
Re: Gloves
« Reply #2 on: 15:26:47, 19/11/20 »
It rather depends on where you are hiking and in what weather.  What did you have in mind?
Solvitur Ambulando

windyrigg

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 109
Re: Gloves
« Reply #3 on: 15:31:34, 19/11/20 »
For proper waterproof I use Sealskins; these also keep me pretty warm unless its extreme cold. For more general winter use I've got old fibre pile gloves and mitts. For skiing and the like I use leather motorcycle gloves, lots of choice of waterproof & windproof. Ex-Army is also an option, the last set I got were £3, totally warm and dry for years!

lostme1

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1301
Re: Gloves
« Reply #4 on: 16:00:45, 19/11/20 »

I purchased a pair of Sealskin gloves in a sale and found them disappointing as my hands are always cold. They were still expensive in the sale  :(
These boots are made for walking.... so long as the rest of my body agrees

ninthace

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7647
Re: Gloves
« Reply #5 on: 16:10:10, 19/11/20 »
I purchased a pair of Sealskin gloves in a sale and found them disappointing as my hands are always cold. They were still expensive in the sale  :(
I bought a set of allegedly waterproof Sealskinz gloves.  Leaked so bad I could have used them as a tea strainer.
In severe cold I wear my ski gloves (gortex/thinsulate).  If it gets colder I add a set of silk liners.  If it gets less cold I just wear the liners.  Tip:  put the liners on as soon as you arrive and before you start to kit up.  You can tie laces etc with the liners on and it is easier to keep hands warm than to try to warm them up again.  I also have a set of fleece gloves that do for shorter walks when it isn't going to rain.
Solvitur Ambulando

Shelley

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Re: Gloves
« Reply #6 on: 17:03:16, 19/11/20 »
Thanks so much for the suggestions. It looks as if itís going to be a challenge. I should have said that I am a womenís size small for gloves and that already places some limitations. I donít ski but it can get very cold around here (south pennines).

Bigfoot_Mike

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2258
Re: Gloves
« Reply #7 on: 17:39:14, 19/11/20 »
When it gets really cold, I find mittens are better than gloves. I had some excellent wooden mittens that were surprisingly good at keeping out water. My wife converted them to much smaller mittens that fitted her small hands in the washing machine. Like ninthace, I also had some thinsulate lined Goretex mittens that keep my hands warm at 3,000+ metres in the Alps.

forgotmyoldpassword

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 642
Re: Gloves
« Reply #8 on: 19:38:17, 19/11/20 »
Sealskinz used to be amazing but they outsourced production and they are now somewhat expensive and quite average. I have a pair and am not particularly impressed with them.


A lot would depend what you do - if you're just walking and don't use hiking poles then nothing beats mittens.  If you want to pick up some dachsteins and a set of waterproof overmittens it'll probably cost you around 50 quid and you'll have warm and dry hands in the majority of conditions you're in.


Anything else comes down to how much dexterity you will need, if you're holding tools, if you'll need to move snow barehanded etc.  You don't often have to spend a fortune on gloves to get warm ones, but I've found that warm climbing gloves which have some kind of abrasion resistance are usually not cheap.


Also, it goes without saying but have a spare pair in your pack (even if they're cheap, light gloves).  Nothing ruins your day than a winter trip where you lose/soak your gloves and you're left with painful hands.

April

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8447
Re: Gloves
« Reply #9 on: 19:40:54, 19/11/20 »
https://www.millets.co.uk/15981331/peter-storm-ps-j-wp-glv-15981331


I have these, a bargain at the mo. I paid £15 2 years ago. They are warm and waterproof......unless you are out in heavy rain for more than an hour. I am an adult by the way  :)


Edited to add I got the 11-13 year old size (thanks lostme1)
« Last Edit: 08:04:59, 20/11/20 by April »
"Who would've thought...... you are light and darkness coming through" words by Tim Armstrong

NeilC

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 742
Re: Gloves
« Reply #10 on: 21:50:51, 19/11/20 »
I also have sealskinz which are OK for most conditions.


But when it's really cold and wet, they're not so good. Then I turn to a pair of German army surplus Goretex sniper mitts. They have a furry lining and are warm in almost any conditions.


I keep meaning to get a pair of these: https://www.decathlon.co.uk/p/adult-mountain-trekking-waterproof-over-gloves-trek-500-black/_/R-p-158553 - waterproof over-mitts which you can put over non-waterproof gloves or ski mitts. Not great if you need to be checking your phone or GPS regularly but should produce a warm and waterproof system.,




lostme1

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1301
Re: Gloves
« Reply #11 on: 22:21:02, 19/11/20 »
https://www.millets.co.uk/15981331/peter-storm-ps-j-wp-glv-15981331


I have these, a bargain at the mo. I paid £15 2 years ago. They are warm and waterproof......unless you are out in heavy rain for more than an hour. I am an adult by the way  :)
Are you aged 11-13 or younger to get the right fit?
These boots are made for walking.... so long as the rest of my body agrees

gunwharfman

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5569
Re: Gloves
« Reply #12 on: 22:22:36, 19/11/20 »
I gave up on waterproof gloves long ago, if it's cold I now wear a thin pair of Decathlon Thinsulate type gloves, I also have an Alpkit pair, but slightly thicker. If it gets really cold I wear a pair of lightweight mittens over them, I think they are made by Marmot or Berghaus? I've had them for about 5 years and I feel embarrassed that I can't remember? How can I own something for so long and not remember the make?  :-[

To keep my hands and gloves dry I cut an old Black's Gortex jacket at the elbows to make two tubes. The secure ends are tightened at my wrist under my waterproof jacket sleeves and the tubes are about 1" longer than my middle fingers. I heat sealed the cut off ends with a lighted match. They are simple items but work very well, and the only time my gloves can get is if I walk in the rain with my arms in the air, which I never do.

If I lose them I have another old Goretex jacket in my garage just waiting to replace them.

Bigfoot_Mike

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2258
Re: Gloves
« Reply #13 on: 22:55:00, 19/11/20 »
How much dexterity you might need when wearing gloves is worth considering. I once wanted to take a piloting on the summit of Hellvellyn during a whiteout. I had to take off my gloves briefly to operate the camera. Even in that short time, the temperature of my hands dropped so much that the next 5 minutes were agony as they warmed up again in my gloves.

BuzyG

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2090
Re: Gloves
« Reply #14 on: 23:34:34, 19/11/20 »
I have use something similar to these for more years than I can remember.  I buy mine at the local garden centre.


https://ppesuppliesdirect.com/pr/pvc-full-dip-r-gloves-fc320/


I wear my woolly gloves under them.  100% water proof.  Perfect for snowball fights when the kids were young and I had a pair in my ruck sack for this evenings walk.    O0