Author Topic: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?  (Read 2352 times)

Jac

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #15 on: 09:35:10, 03/12/20 »
If it's a walk to be enjoyed again and again then I guess it needs to be local so.....


Parking at White Bridge on the River Otter estuary, out to the cliffs, along the clifftops to Brandy Head lookout for a coffee stop with views of Lyme bay across to Portland, down to Ladram bay possible ice cream up the SWCP to High Peak and Peak Hill, turning inland cross Mutters Moor hoping for Dartford warblers then steeply down rocky Passaford lane to the Otter valley and back along the river, where we might spot the beavers, tea and cake at the Mill Otterton on the way. 10+ miles with a bit of everything.



So many paths yet to walk, so little time left

Slowcoach

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #16 on: 09:51:20, 03/12/20 »
I hope you all realise that I am logging these routes for later use.
It's all uphill from here.

barewirewalker

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #17 on: 10:59:49, 03/12/20 »
whoops
« Last Edit: 11:36:51, 03/12/20 by barewirewalker »
BWW
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Slowcoach

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #18 on: 11:02:22, 03/12/20 »
Thanks for some interesting contributions, the preponderance of cynicism, I expect, is based on personal observation out in the countryside, as are the circumstances woven into my scenario. Mel's 'common sense' suggestion would have fit in with the CLA's title for their 2012 policy on access. Sadly no thoughts along those lines are even hinted in that document.


Actually I would not have gone as far as fencing of a pathway, only a notice of welcome to my land and a offer to use the field margin to the better exit point on the road. I might go as far as to get the OS to map the permissive way in their orange dots. Fencing off is yet another sign of exclusion, as can be seen on Lord Forresters's estate, Bridgnorth, Salop, where a footpath alondgside parkland is effectively excluded from it's natural panorama by hedge and a strategically planted line of trees.


I think we all acknowledge Emdaw's altruistic and socially aware actions. It would be encouraging to think that this might have come from some leadership from the CLA, interesting to know if the Emdaw has been the recipient of the CLA's membership trolling, their ambition to have coast to coast control of our countryside is at the expense of the more professional approach of the NFU (or was when the membership was influenced by the wiser counsel of successful tenants).

Sadly the tragic end to this scenario, I feel developing, does not have the characters around to avert. Perhaps there might be a happy ending.


Wrong thread?
It's all uphill from here.

barewirewalker

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #19 on: 11:28:36, 03/12/20 »
 :-[ so it seems  ;D  appologies to the OP
« Last Edit: 11:35:17, 03/12/20 by barewirewalker »
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

happyhiker

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #20 on: 11:35:28, 03/12/20 »
My choice would be Pen y Ghent in the Yorkshire Dales, from Horton in Ribblesdale. It is within a relatively short drive from where I live and I just love the dramatic view of its "nose" as you approach from Brackenbottom Farm. I've lost track of the number of times I have been up this hill. See route at https://tinyurl.com/ybrmkdpd

BuzyG

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #21 on: 11:43:19, 03/12/20 »
Well having sat here for several minutes pondering.  I can't think of one single day walk.  There are simply thousands that I would love to do again and far more that I have not yet done.  One thing I love about the SW moors is you don't have to follow the paths, so every walk is different even between the same points.  O0

My favourite Destination locally is Fur Tor on Dartmoor.  Simply park any where you can on the North moor and then set off.  Perhaps another thread.

With that in mine I finally have a favourite. Around the Dartmoor 600s starting from Meldon Quarry.

Yes tor, Ted Hughes memorial, tea break, Hanging Stone Hill, Whitehorse Hill, Cut Hill, Fur tor for late lunch. Then back North to High Willhays.  The distance and time taken can vary a lot, depending on use or not of tracks.   I have walked it several times in recent years and even lead our ramblers group around a few years back.

Give it a go.  :)

GinAndPlatonic

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #22 on: 11:54:17, 03/12/20 »


My favourite walk is always my next one... but my past favourite walk that I have done many times is the Brecon four peaks of Corn Du , Pen Y Fan , Cribyn and Fan y Big with variations to get changes of views .

For me it is the views that this area affords anyone going up there, that attracts me , when the air is clear and the sun is shining .  :)



Virtue is more to be feared than vice, because it's excesses are not subject to the regulation of conscience - Adam Smith

Jac

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #23 on: 12:30:09, 03/12/20 »

With that in mine I finally have a favourite. Around the Dartmoor 600s starting from Meldon Quarry.

Yes tor, Ted Hughes memorial, tea break, Hanging Stone Hill, Whitehorse Hill, Cut Hill, Fur tor for late lunch. Then back North to High Willhays.  The distance and time taken can vary a lot, depending on use or not of tracks.   I have walked it several times in recent years and even lead our ramblers group around a few years back.

Give it a go.  :)


I'd like to but the 14+ miles when plotting it in straight lines is too much now in one day for me - but - perhaps a two day wild camp after a dry spell  :)
So many paths yet to walk, so little time left

BuzyG

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #24 on: 12:30:30, 03/12/20 »

My favourite walk is always my next one... but my past favourite walk that I have done many times is the Brecon four peaks of Corn Du , Pen Y Fan , Cribyn and Fan y Big with variations to get changes of views .

For me it is the views that this area affords anyone going up there, that attracts me , when the air is clear and the sun is shining .  :)


I almost choose that one myself.  I am thinking of doing it again at the weekend, but perhaps I should leave it as a happy memory, as the last time I walked it was in Perfect winter conditions.

« Last Edit: 12:35:26, 03/12/20 by BuzyG »

Jac

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #25 on: 13:05:50, 03/12/20 »
Wow!


Need to put the heating on after seeing that!
So many paths yet to walk, so little time left

BuzyG

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #26 on: 13:09:43, 03/12/20 »

I'd like to but the 14+ miles when plotting it in straight lines is too much now in one day for me - but - perhaps a two day wild camp after a dry spell  :)


I like your plan Jac.  Just be sure to top up your water crossing the head of the East Dart.  Many a young group has camped at fur tor only to wake up a realise it's 100m+ down and back if you want fresh water. ;D

Skip

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #27 on: 13:20:31, 03/12/20 »
. . . one single walk that stands out . . . I am interested in seeing your day walks.

That's a hard one: there are so many to choose from.

In Wales it would be the Snowdon Horseshoe. Or Tryfan and the Glyderau.

In the Peak District, the full circuit of Kinder Edges.

In the Lake District, one is really spoilt for choice.  As April says, Blencathra takes some beating whichever way you walk up.  Sca Fell via Lords Rake and the West Wall Traverse is good too.

But my absolute favourite Lakes long day out is a figure-of-eight circuit from Langdale to Scafell Pike (outward via Mickleden, Rossett Pass, Angle Tarn, Esk Hause shelter, Sty Head, The Corridor Route, Lingmell Col, Scafell Pike; return via Broad Crag, Great End, Esk Hause, Bowfell, Three Tarns, and down The Band).

-Dave- and I did this walk over a year ago; his blog and photos are here
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strawy

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #28 on: 15:25:15, 03/12/20 »
For me its probably Corrour Station back to Rannoch on the road to the isles, i,d wanted to do it for ages & i finally did it last year,so glad i did,not a "hard" walk but so enjoyable & the station to station train journey was great as well..

One F

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Re: One Single Day Walk. Which would you choose?
« Reply #29 on: 15:40:43, 03/12/20 »
Ingleborough by Wharf, Crummack and Moughton, back by Gaping Ghyll and Clapham where there might be tea and a scone or even a pint. But like Ridge I might be back with another one tomorrow. I'm not sure if favourite walks as in one's you can do again and again and walks that stand out as wonderful days out are the same. The again and again walks involve varied scenery and, for me, flowers, so a bit of limestone and a bit of woodland is good. The stand out walks are, again as Ridge says, great walks, great company and often good weather.


That is very nearly my choice too. But I would make it a circular from Clapham, up through the tunnels and then along Thwaite Lane for a while before crossing the wall (stile) and heading towards Robin Proctors Scar. Through the Norber Erratics and then along the escarpment and down into Crummack Dale. Beggars Stile, Thieves Moss and Sulber Gate next before taking the main path from Horton, via Simon Fell Breast and Swine Tail, onto the Ingleborough Summit Plateau. Return to Clapham by Little Ingleborough, Gaping Ghyll (not forgetting to stop and have another peek over the edge), Trow Gill and then, if open, an ice cream from the shop at Ingleborough Cave. Last stretch down the Nature Trail (Ransomes, Bluebells and Rhodendrons in Spring) into Clapham.


Lost count how many times I have followed this route but every time it has hit the spot.