Author Topic: Bob Graham Round walk  (Read 1063 times)

Bjl

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Bob Graham Round walk
« on: 21:06:10, 10/12/20 »
Thinking of ideas for next year , hopefully !  Has anyone hiked the Bob Graham round in four or five days , ideally stop over in hostels or b/bs .  Has anyone any experience doing this and how did you get on , where did you stay ?
First time poster , be kind  :) .

BuzyG

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #1 on: 21:33:54, 10/12/20 »
There are a number of Lake land regulars on here, who may be able to help. 

Alas I am not one of them, so I will just say welcome to the forum, from a rather grey Cornwall. :)

forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #2 on: 22:11:08, 10/12/20 »
Hey!  Sounds like an interesting way to spend some time in the mountains so why not.


https://where2walk.co.uk/home/walking-challenges/bob-graham-round/ is probably a good place to start and gives more of an overview. 


One thing I'd consider is how 'beholden' are you to the original route and how much would you want to go slightly away from it to get a more interesting/scenic route.  If you're keen to stick to the original, absolutely fine, but be aware there may be accommodation options/route alternatives elsewhere.


In terms of places worth stopping for accommodation, 4-5 days is pretty leisurely so you can afford to spend some time in each place in between walking.  Keswick and going clockwise is probably the easiest route (relatively simple first day and Scales/Threlkeld has a decent pub to stop at) then decide whether you want to turn Day 2 (Clough Head and due south towards Grasmere) into a one day epic or take your time and break it up.  The Lodge in the Vale is a good stop about half way down and does a superb 'hikers breakfast' (I remember eating an absolute load of food when I was skiing there last), though there are pubs north of Grasmere on your route (Travelers Rest I believe but look it up) if you'd prefer to keep your route shorter.  I'm not a fan of the Dunmail route up Steel Fell as it's always fkin soaking wet whenever I'm there so my personal preference would be to spend a night near in Grasmere and head up Helm Crag for a more characterful route up the Easedale valley - however that would take you technically 'off route'.


From Grasmere you're heading towards Wasdale Head and if you're having a leisurely route you might look for accommodation in the Langdale area.  At this point a lot depends on your pace and confidence in the mountains - as you've got Langdale, Wasdale, Rosthwaite and Keswick/Portinscale/Brainwaite as the 3 night stops respectively.  Old Dungeon Ghyll (or somewhere else in upper Langdale) to Wasdale Head is quite a decent hill day out which is why I'd be inclined to break up the route over the eastern fells in to two days, not least because it's one of my favourite routes and deserves a leisurely pace to savour it but because it'll leave you fresher to enjoy the slow pull up towards Bow Fell and lets you enjoy some of the best views in the area on this day. 


From Wasdale Head, the Honister Pass is likely a better place to stop for that day's exploits rather than pushing on to Rosthwaite unless you're planning to give yourself a bit of a rest and explore the lower Borrowdale area.  I quite like Glaramara (the hotel) as they've been sensible with Covid security, have a cozy bar and are well set up for hikers without being as austere as some hostels can be - but this would represent a commitment to a bit more up/down and you'd need the legs to do it.  Last day over the Derwent Fells should be quite simple if you've made it that far and Robinson will give you some variety in the descent.



« Last Edit: 09:45:07, 11/12/20 by forgotmyoldpassword »

karl h

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #3 on: 22:22:50, 10/12/20 »
Welcome to the forum Bjl,
Although I've probably walked most sections of the BGR I've never done it in one continuous walk ( although it's something I've thought about for a while )
 I think it would be hard to stick exactly to the route if you were staying in hostels or BB's as opposed to camping as you would have to divert to find your accommodation. Also there are a couple of crazy ascents that the runners take ( Steel fell and Yewbarrow ) which you may or may not be comfortable with. ;)


 The BGR is a great template for a walking tour of the Lakes but have you considered Wainwrights tour from 1931 where  he made use of guest houses in the valleys.
If you do do it report back with lots of photos :)
show your love for Lady Nature. And she will come back again.
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pdstsp

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #4 on: 09:09:49, 11/12/20 »
Morning all and welcome to the forum BJ


I've been looking at this over the last few weeks, with a vague plan of doing it in April over a few days - interesting comments from FMOP and Karl.  I still cannot belive people do this non-stop! 


As an aside, earlier in Lockdown 1, Photonut and I came up with a  cracking pub to pub round starting from Coniston, which is still a favourite and may overtake the BG in my intentions.


I would back up everything FMOP and Karl have said - some great recommendations from FMOP of place to break the journey, but, as Karl says, you may find you are adding vertical feet to do so - and I would wholeheartedly support the view of avoiding the ridge beyond Steel Fell unless you do this after a long dry spell. Also check with the Lodge in the Vale - last time I stayed in the Kings Head, just up the road, the guests from the Lodge were being sent up there for breakfast - may have been a short term thing but worth checking.


Paul

Bjl

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #5 on: 10:17:43, 12/12/20 »
Thanks for the welcome and the replies . Some good suggestions there and I guess Iím not really fixed on the Bob Graham route . It would be the first time we did a tour type walk, we normally just stay in the same place, so will make an interesting change .

snaderson

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #6 on: 11:01:51, 12/12/20 »
I did Trail Magazine's Lake District Haute Route (see https://www.livefortheoutdoors.com/lakeshauteroute) a couple of years ago and really enjoyed it, if you're considering alternatives. Avoiding the tops makes it a bit less arduous if this was your first multiday trek.

richardh1905

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #7 on: 11:03:54, 12/12/20 »
I'm not going to comment on the BG Round as I prefer to plan my own routes, but welcome to the forum.  :)
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forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #8 on: 20:04:23, 12/12/20 »
I did Trail Magazine's Lake District Haute Route (see https://www.livefortheoutdoors.com/lakeshauteroute) a couple of years ago and really enjoyed it, if you're considering alternatives. Avoiding the tops makes it a bit less arduous if this was your first multiday trek.


That's a lovely route for someone less comfortable with the up/down involved in multi-days, some lovely valleys there.  Personally I'd have had to modify it to include the Coniston fells as well as perhaps adjust the route from Buttermere and head up via Coledale instead of doubling back via the lakeside walk to Keswick, but that's just a preference of mine for remote valleys and that I think those would be a shame to miss out on.


As Richard says, I'd suggest making the route your own and seeing what you're interested in but my advice would be to watch how arduous you make it if you're inexperienced.  Painful and damaged feet make any beautiful surroundings tiresome so just take your time, get a bit more flexibility in your route and don't expect to fly up hills on the 5th day as fast as you did on the 1st. 

photonut

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #9 on: 11:22:50, 14/12/20 »
Hi Bjl,

The advise given here so far is pretty solid and well worth listening to with regards attempting anything like the BG round.

Like a few here, I have done the route in separate sections... I have no idea how folk run it in one go!  I would like to say it could be walked in three days but the first section up Skiddaw and Blencathra does not set you up nicely for the Helvellyn range bit.  With an early start the Skiddaw, Great Calva and Blencathra section would see you starting quite late in the day - probably around midday ish.  I'm sure there will be someone that has done this from the forum but going off my own experience of this route you would be walking during the night.... and I can't see the point of that!

The route can easily be split into 4 days I guess but you would need to be really fell fit and taking time to admire the scenery from the summits would be out as you just wouldn't have time to spend.


Have you done a lot of hill walking?



As an aside, earlier in Lockdown 1, Photonut and I came up with a  cracking pub to pub round starting from Coniston, which is still a favourite and may overtake the BG in my intentions.



I'd forgotten about that route

Bjl

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #10 on: 19:41:05, 16/12/20 »
We have been used to doing two decent mountain day walks together . We did the Everest base camp trek in 2019 and spent a lot of weekends doing good double days .
I like the idea of the pub to pub route and am not fixed to the Bob Graham route on reflection . It was just an idea grab really and donít really need to bag all those summits. A nice route through the valleys maybe throw in a few peaks and a nice pub at the end sounds more like it . Thanks for input and welcomes everyone .

WILDWALKINGUK

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #11 on: 08:23:59, 10/01/21 »
I walked and wild-camped around a large part of the Bob Graham Round over Christmas. It's a great route and I really enjoyed it. I've written a post on it which may be of interest and help with your planning, included below. You'll have to change the route quite a bit to stay in accommodation every night.


 https://wildwalkinguk.com/2021/01/08/a-high-level-5-day-wild-camping-circuit-of-the-lake-district-in-the-snow/




Roburite

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #12 on: 11:50:37, 10/01/21 »
I looked up the Wainwright walk mentioned above and found this eleven stage walk. -
The Wainwright Memorial Walk is the 107-mile route through the Lake District that A. Wainwright - legendary author, artist and fell-walker - set out to walk with three friends over the Whitsunday holiday of 1931. The route the friends took - recorded in sketch maps at the time - is highlighted here on maps from Wainwright's much-loved Pictorial Guides, accompanied by text from the guides and Wainwright's other writings. Wainwright's walk - originally planned to take six days - is here split into eleven manageable stages. These can be taken either as independent one-day walks or as a whole. The route starts in Windermere and ends in Ambleside. Along the way, Wainwright promises to lead the walker everywhere worth mentioning in the Lake District, on a route devised to make sure that 'Every lake, Every valley, Every mountain, will be seen if not actually visited'.                                             https://www.ldwa.org.uk/ldp/members/show_path.php?path_name=Wainwright+Memorial+Walk

windyrigg

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #13 on: 15:12:46, 10/01/21 »
I've also been toying with the idea of the Wainwright Memorial Walk. It's not (yet) that popular, or perhaps not that well known, which has to be an attraction (less people). The route certainly makes a serious attempt to take you all over the Lakes. I've done the research on a handful of UK walks so I'm in a position to go at short(ish) notice when the opportunity comes and this is one of them.
Increasing the duration of long distance walks from eg 2 days straight up to 11 days is quite a jump. If shorter walks are more appropriate maybe the Dales Way or Cumbrian Way might be worth a look?

forgotmyoldpassword

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Re: Bob Graham Round walk
« Reply #14 on: 16:38:32, 10/01/21 »
I looked up the Wainwright walk mentioned above and found this eleven stage walk. -
The Wainwright Memorial Walk is the 107-mile route through the Lake District that A. Wainwright - legendary author, artist and fell-walker - set out to walk with three friends over the Whitsunday holiday of 1931. The route the friends took - recorded in sketch maps at the time - is highlighted here on maps from Wainwright's much-loved Pictorial Guides, accompanied by text from the guides and Wainwright's other writings. Wainwright's walk - originally planned to take six days - is here split into eleven manageable stages. These can be taken either as independent one-day walks or as a whole. The route starts in Windermere and ends in Ambleside. Along the way, Wainwright promises to lead the walker everywhere worth mentioning in the Lake District, on a route devised to make sure that 'Every lake, Every valley, Every mountain, will be seen if not actually visited'.                                             https://www.ldwa.org.uk/ldp/members/show_path.php?path_name=Wainwright+Memorial+Walk


I just checked it out and followed the route, quite stunning and I like that it includes so many tarns. 


Not so sure about less people as you'll still see loads on the busy fells, but the great thing about some parts of the Lakes is you can find quiet valleys and hills with hardly anyone about - even if you get to benefit from the infrastructure and you know the valleys are full of people.


The Dales Highway is quite a nice route too and includes plenty of the Howgills..  and the Cumbria Way is a classic for a reason. If you want more of a challenge deviate the CW from Rosthwaite towards Buttermere and then aim to get yourself to Braithwaite.