Author Topic: Scanning 35mm Transparencies  (Read 365 times)

GrumpyPhart

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 80
Scanning 35mm Transparencies
« on: 09:46:47, 26/12/20 »
I'm scanning some transparencies and endeavouring to do some corrections and adjustments. This particular one needs some adjustments in particular in the bottom right hand corner.
Currently it has a weird sort of darkness to it which I want to try and adjust to look a bit more "natural".
Has anyone got any ideas or suggestions.
Thanks


Bigfoot_Mike

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2407
Re: Scanning 35mm Transparencies
« Reply #1 on: 11:09:18, 26/12/20 »
What are you using to do adjustments? This could do with the shadows being lifted and an adjustment in white balance to counteract the blue cast

GrumpyPhart

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 80
Re: Scanning 35mm Transparencies
« Reply #2 on: 11:40:29, 26/12/20 »
What are you using to do adjustments? This could do with the shadows being lifted and an adjustment in white balance to counteract the blue cast
Thanks, I'll try the white balance
I've been experimenting with both SilverFast 8(the scanner software) and Paint Shop

Bigfoot_Mike

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2407
Re: Scanning 35mm Transparencies
« Reply #3 on: 12:53:24, 26/12/20 »
I havenít tried it, but Gimp is free software for photo manipulation that seems to have a good reputation. I use Lightroom Classic, but that is not free. If you lift the shadows, you will probably get additional noise, so may need to add some noise reduction. You also be aware that JPEG is a lossy format and repeated saving of files depletes quality. It is worth keeping an original that you can go back totter experimenting with processing and finding what works best for you pictures.

barewirewalker

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3561
Re: Scanning 35mm Transparencies
« Reply #4 on: 13:03:33, 26/12/20 »
If you try the free photo editing programme GIMP, you can edit different value scans simultaneously.
You could scan different value files, then open up these as separate layers in GIMP. Perhaps this would save some of the detail in underexposed and overexposed areas, I find the levels adjustments very good and the masking tools in the most recent versions easy to understand. Many very good tutorials on youtube.

Masking is a non-destructive method of cutting out parts of an image.

BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6255
Re: Scanning 35mm Transparencies
« Reply #5 on: 09:28:51, 27/12/20 »
I just use the Microsoft Photo Editor that comes with Windows. Try boosting the shadows a bit.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

andybr

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 133
Re: Scanning 35mm Transparencies
« Reply #6 on: 11:43:44, 27/12/20 »
Gimp is excellent but there is alot to learn in order to get the best out of it. The Windows phot editor is easier to get to grips with and still very good. I would avoid the preset filters however and go straight to the "Adjustments" tab where you need to expand the categories to access the individual controls. Unfortunately you may still find that the very underexposed areas contain no detail to start with. We ave become used to the level of detail available in digital images but this was just not there with film.

Bigfoot_Mike

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2407
Re: Scanning 35mm Transparencies
« Reply #7 on: 11:55:59, 27/12/20 »
We ave become used to the level of detail available in digital images but this was just not there with film.
Actually, 35mm film has a higher resolution (equivalent to about 87 Megapixels) than pretty much any digital camera around. Dynamic range would also be at least as good for print film, but may not be so good for slide film, particularly if underexposed.  The limit of the detail may well be the scanner resolution and dynamic range, rather than the original picture.

barewirewalker

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3561
Re: Scanning 35mm Transparencies
« Reply #8 on: 12:20:54, 27/12/20 »
The limit of the detail may well be the scanner resolution and dynamic range, rather than the original picture.
That was the reason I suggested using layers and masking.
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

andybr

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 133
Re: Scanning 35mm Transparencies
« Reply #9 on: 14:03:58, 27/12/20 »
Actually, 35mm film has a higher resolution (equivalent to about 87 Megapixels) than pretty much any digital camera around. Dynamic range would also be at least as good for print film, but may not be so good for slide film, particularly if underexposed.  The limit of the detail may well be the scanner resolution and dynamic range, rather than the original picture.


The issue is with dynamic range rather than resolution. Even very basic digital cameras can record far more detail than appears in the image it concocts for the user. Using Raw data allows you to access the extremes though you clearly need the right software and understanding to access it.