Author Topic: How other countries deal with rescues  (Read 556 times)

jimbob

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2250
How other countries deal with rescues
« on: 15:03:42, 11/01/21 »
Just been reading about a rescue in the Pyranees where a German fellow had to be rescued.

The local government has forbidden winter use of  a particular route over the Pyraness due to the dangers involved in bad weather.
This is  the Route de Napoleon between St. Jean Pied De Port and Roncesvalles.
The man ignored the ban and had to be rescued. He was fined 12,000 Euros for the rescue. Which as they said years ago when they passed the law doesn't even begin to compensate the risks taken by the volunteer and professionals involved in such a rescue. Fines are limited up to 50, 000 euros.
Too little, too late, too bad......

BuzyG

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2144
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #1 on: 16:11:53, 11/01/21 »
It's a very good and British thing, that we have MRT, RNLI, NHS, Air Ambulance, Coast Guard and numerous other small organisations.  I have happily, by good fortune or judgement never needed any of them.  Though the RNLI have tried to rescue me a few times, when I was simply enjoying a days lone surfing in the middle of winter storms.  Both occasion I thanked them, refused a lift and made my own way back to shore.

We each make our own judgement calls on risk, as do each and every member of the rescue service each time they are called out.  Remember they don't have to though.  They can say no, I'm not going out in that, it is beyond my skill set comfort zone etc.  Fortunately for the rest of us, their skill sets and commitment to each other and others, as organisations and as teams working together, is very high indeed. O0

As for paying.  That should also be a voluntary thing.  I recall we paid the crew of a Portuguese cutter, two crates of beer.  After they towed our ships boat back to HMS Ajax, after we, the WE JR's mess, broke the rudder off during a Banyan. ;)
« Last Edit: 16:15:50, 11/01/21 by BuzyG »

gunwharfman

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5850
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #2 on: 16:32:39, 11/01/21 »
I've walked from Roncevalles to St Jean Pied du Port at the height of the summer in blistering heat, (it was difficult then) but due to the openness of much of the route I assume, it must be treacherous at times in the dead of winter? If a local authority knows with confidence what an area is like in the winter I can understand why they would try to stop or inhibit people from going there.

Bigfoot_Mike

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2407
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #3 on: 17:27:34, 11/01/21 »
When I walked in the French Alps, I took out additional insurance in case of the need for rescue. As it turned out I did have an accident, but didnít need rescuing.

Jac

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2776
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #4 on: 18:16:35, 11/01/21 »
It's a very good and British thing, that we have MRT, RNLI, NHS, Air Ambulance, Coast Guard and numerous other small organisations. ......................................
I recall we paid the crew of a Portuguese cutter, two crates of beer.  After they towed our ships boat back to HMS Ajax, after we, the WE JR's mess, broke the rudder off during a Banyan. ;)


Ah Banyans, happy memories of swimming and water skiing in the Johore Straits - until a found a large monitor lizard swimming along side me :o
So many paths yet to walk, so little time left

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5960
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #5 on: 18:39:39, 11/01/21 »
Very wise to take out insurance if you are walking in the Alps or Pyrenees - helicopters are eye wateringly expensive!
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

windyrigg

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 170
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #6 on: 08:20:45, 12/01/21 »
The last time we hired a chopper at work it was £400/hr, I suspect it's since gone up!

barewirewalker

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3533
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #7 on: 11:53:32, 12/01/21 »
My memories of rescue/recovery insurance in the 1960-70s through British Mountaineering Council was its main purpose was to cover the cost of professional guides, if a helicopter was bought in the guides association for that area included it in the cost of the whole. As far as I know, there would be no voluntary participation.

Have things changed, then it was assumed that the professional guides associations in France would sting British Climbers as a matter of course because they were less likely to use their services, professions that rely on providing services for tourism have to mitigate some of their charges in the cause of good public relations.

In this country, rescue has been a free service because it started off from being provided by fellow mountaineers, I doubt a volunteer would be given a place on a stretcher today, whereas in the early sixties I was put on the front end of two stretcher recoveries, the minute I arrived on the scene. When RAF mountain rescue teams contributed it was described as practice for the real thing, should they go into action?

Back in the Alps I recall nearing the summit of the Dent Du Requien, I traversed out on the bottom edge of a slab that overhung the main face, obscuring part of the Snowfield at the bottom of the Aiguille, just before I started to climb the fracture line in the centre of the slab, I looked between my legs and a helicopter appeared there neatly fitting between my knees before it disappeared under the edge of the rock I was about to climb. Was it carrying supplies to the Requien Refuge or was it flying off a casualty? Never did find out, cynical old age gives me a third option, some 'too rich' braggart got flown in to avoid the day-long slog up the Mer de Glace so, he can build up a CV to get on an Everest attempt.


After thought, the heli did have red marking so perhaps it could have been a resue.
« Last Edit: 12:30:10, 12/01/21 by barewirewalker »
BWW
Their Land is in Our Country.

richardh1905

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5960
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #8 on: 12:27:12, 12/01/21 »
The last time we hired a chopper at work it was £400/hr, I suspect it's since gone up!


Worked out at around £2000/hr for a EC135 a few years ago, and that was for a long contract.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

jimbob

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2250
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #9 on: 12:47:51, 12/01/21 »
I suppose the main thing to note is that if walking in other countries you need to be aware of their rules.

They may charge for rescue.

They may levy fines for being "out of bounds".

They may have the legal right to shut down and make public walking paths out of bounds.
On this particular route there are huge notices stating in a number of languages that it is not permitted to be used between certain dates.
Too little, too late, too bad......

Bigfoot_Mike

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2407
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #10 on: 06:52:25, 13/01/21 »

Worked out at around £2000/hr for a EC135 a few years ago, and that was for a long contract.
That is more what I was expecting. I suspect it is higher than that now. It has been a few years since I have had a need for a helicopter.

Dyffryn Ardudwy

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1861
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #11 on: 12:10:37, 14/01/21 »


Some years ago, a friend was taking part in the Jungfrau Marathon, and because the medics thought he looked a bit knackered, they ordered in a helicopter to take him back to the start.

A princely sum of £500 was removed from his Bank account, for the pleasure flight.

The race regulations stipulated that any competitor who according to the medics, needed to be rescued, would need a spin in their helicopter.


Mountain Rescue teams abroad, charge for their time, and quite rightly so.


This is why i regularly give money to both the RNLI and Mountain rescue lads in Snowdonia, because they are expected to risk their lives for no recompense.


For rescue services to have to beg for public support, makes no sense in the 21C.


That angers me  BIG TIME
« Last Edit: 18:31:55, 14/01/21 by Chris »

jimbob

  • Veteran Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2250
Re: How other countries deal with rescues
« Reply #12 on: 12:59:11, 14/01/21 »
Hi Dyffryn, you may not be aware but the NHS can and does often charge for treatment given as a result of car accidents, seemingly that charge can cover ambulance /air ambulance charges. This is normally covered by your car insurance. The BMA issued updated guidelines in Sept. 2020.So we have a long term precedent for the ability to charge in this country despite your thoughts that it is all free.
I certainly agree that the RNLi. AIR ambulanceand MRTs should at the very least have equipment supplied and maintenance ce costs covered by central government. I truly believe in the voluntary aspects of the personnel though.

Too little, too late, too bad......