Author Topic: wainwrights  (Read 625 times)

andrew01756

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wainwrights
« on: 21:20:32, 21/01/21 »
wanting to cover wainwrights with my 15 and 14 year olds . which 2or3 would be reasonable to start off with in 1 walk also possible to finish close to the starting point
thanks

Ridge

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #1 on: 23:09:36, 21/01/21 »
This is hard not knowing your and their experience.
Lord's Seat and Barf, possibly adding in Broom Fell, from Whinlatter Forest car park should be a gentle start for you all.

andrew01756

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #2 on: 01:26:38, 22/01/21 »
ive walked with them always they have done 3 peaks . several 10 mile ish walks . not really done anything in the lakes though .. i have a long time ago .. thanks

snaderson

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #3 on: 07:58:03, 22/01/21 »
Silver How and Loughrigg from Grasmere? Fairfield Horseshoe? Skiddaw, Lonscale Fell and Latrigg? This website is a great resource: http://www.sharkeysdream.co.uk/PAGES/FELL_LIST/214_FELLS_MAP.html

Ridge

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #4 on: 08:37:51, 22/01/21 »
That changes everything.
Ignore my previous post there are many wonderful walks you could try.  I'm on my way to work, will post later.

richardh1905

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #5 on: 09:01:57, 22/01/21 »
So many to choose from.


Newlands Horseshoe is a cracker (Catbells, Maiden Moor, High Spy, Dale Head, Hindscarth, Robinson), with the option of cutting things short by returning down the Newlands Valley if they have had enough after High Spy.


PS - welcome to the forum  :)
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richardh1905

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #6 on: 09:04:44, 22/01/21 »
A promenade over the Coniston fells springs to mind, too. Lots of peaks that are easy to link together.
WildAboutWalking - Join me on my walks through the wilder parts of Britain

andrew01756

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #7 on: 11:02:55, 22/01/21 »
thanks .. plenty to get started on appreciated

Ridge

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #8 on: 23:26:12, 22/01/21 »
Newlands was going to be a suggestion of mine.

I'll go for this one instead.
Helm Crag, Gibson Knot, Calf Crag, Steel Fell from and back to Grasmere. You don't have to climb the howitzer on the top of Helm Crag if you or they don't fancy it, Wainwright never did. It's not too far and you need to do the descent from Steel Fell while your knees are young.

LostWays

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #9 on: 16:07:15, 17/02/21 »
Great Mell Fell and Little Mell Fell would be good starter Wainwrights, Gowbarrow Fell is also nearby.  Binsey would also be a good starter.

Skip

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #10 on: 17:06:55, 17/02/21 »
As others have said, there are many routes to choose from.

I'd add a vote for the Newlands Round (full or partial depending on conditions, level of fitness etc). Here's a Trip Report of the round:https://allthegearbutnoidea.blogspot.com/2018/10/the-newlands-round.html

A more general suggestion: if you are setting out to bag all the Wainwrights, you might think about the first and last 'ticks' on the list - as they are significant, choose them with care. You might want to start with a memorable challenging walk but save the best (which does not necessarily mean one of the most popular or the highest) until last.
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Ridge

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #11 on: 18:33:17, 17/02/21 »
Great Mell Fell and Little Mell Fell would be good starter Wainwrights, Gowbarrow Fell is also nearby.  Binsey would also be a good starter.
Not the most inspiring for a couple of teenagers though.


A more general suggestion: if you are setting out to bag all the Wainwrights, you might think about the first and last 'ticks' on the list - as they are significant, choose them with care. You might want to start with a memorable challenging walk but save the best (which does not necessarily mean one of the most popular or the highest) until last.
Good point from Skip, you may also want to get a Wainwright chart to record your progress or join a hill bagging site.
http://www.hill-bagging.co.uk/

You may also want to get Stuart Marshall's Walking the Wainwrights book though he is a bit bonkers at times.

Skip

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #12 on: 19:00:53, 17/02/21 »
. . . you may also want to get a Wainwright chart to record your progress or join a hill bagging site

Ridge is right: if you are going to do all 214 Wainwrights then record-keeping will be a big part of it.

I started off with a list of Wainwrights in alpha order which I found on a website. I printed it out and (literally) 'ticked' the hills I'd walked up.

Later as I got more into bagging I set up an account with www.hill-bagging.co.uk/ which Ridge mentions above. It is the online version of the Database of British and Irish Hills (DoBIH). All the well-known lists - Munros, Marilyns, Nuttals, Wainwrights, Birketts etc - are covered. You can use the Hill Bagging website to log your progress.
Skip

Ridge

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Re: wainwrights
« Reply #13 on: 19:39:13, 17/02/21 »
Remember to take photos too. I had to retro-do my early record keeping but was absolutely scrupulous with my son, I have a photo of him on 213 of his first Wainwrights.