Author Topic: Micro adventures on The Weston Front  (Read 726 times)

weston.front

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Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« on: 20:22:50, 28/01/21 »
I started backpacking back in 1985 and by 1987 I started enjoying it whilst on the first leg of my walk around the SW Peninsula Coast Path.  Back then I had the occasional night of wild camping before this was a recognised term on a YouTube phenomenon.  Back then it was down to convenience and cost.  I completed the SWPCP in 1991.  Roll the clock on some 26 years during which interval cycle touring was passion, something inspired me to replace my aged TN Solar 2 tent and I wild camped again for the first time in a long while.  Whilst the weather on my first two day outing left a lot to be desired (!) I had found a new love, what my son calls 'Daddy camping in the middle of nowhere'.


My first wild camping microadventure was within the local Forest of Bowland, after this I was hooked : See https://bit.ly/3icdXbH
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richardh1905

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #1 on: 22:41:17, 28/01/21 »
Enjoyed reading your blog, WestonFront. Forest of Bowland will receive a visit from me shortly after we are let loose.


Regarding 'microadventures' - yes, that really is how it feels to head up into the hills on my own with a tent on my back, even if it is only for one night. The full mountain experience. Better in some ways to have 7 one night trips than one 7 night trip (although both are worthwhile), as the microadventures are easier to fit in to everyday life, especially if you live near some decent country.
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windyrigg

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #2 on: 15:06:43, 29/01/21 »
I'm a big fan of micro-adventures, especially when they come as a surprise. My son (aged about 6 at the time) and I were wild camping in the Cheviot hills one evening when 6 Belgian soldiers arrived and sat down with us for a chat. This wasn't too much  of a surprise as we were on the Otterburn Ranges and Belgian troops used to come for training. This lot were French (and English) speaking, and between them were carrying a huge machine gun in pieces. My sons eyes were nearly coming out of his head, they were in full camo, faces painted, the lot. I asked about the machine gun and it turned out to be an American model used back to WW2 and Korea. They soon had it all put together with number 1 son sat behind it pretending to spray the hillside with bullets; they actually had a bullet belt but fortunately that wasn't fitted! That all turned the camp into a bit of an adventure.
Now I reflect on this we were at Coquet head, on one side we had Chew Green Roman camp (a fort), and our tent was 10yds from the rock were the Earl Douglas was laid to die after the Battle of Otterburn (1388); the present military are alot more welcoming - but keep away from the live firing bit  O0

richardh1905

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #3 on: 20:56:21, 29/01/21 »
The Cheviot hills are another 'blank spot on the map', as far as I am concerned - must visit soon.
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weston.front

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #4 on: 21:50:13, 29/01/21 »
Watch this space....
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weston.front

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #5 on: 11:09:38, 03/02/21 »
Part 2 - Having had my appetite wetted (in more way that one!) later that same year I waited for a good weather window and headed out again

https://westonfront.wordpress.com/2017/08/16/24-hours-in-the-forest-without-trees-a-micro-adventure/

This time I indulged another facet of walking that I love and that is 'not turning around'.  For me there is something so uplifting about a linear walk, always covering new ground and having more of a goal than 'finding the car again'.   Often I find that when you plan a circular route (unless it is big enough) that there is a compromise in at least part of the return leg.  I am fortunate to have an accommodating spouse who's happy to drop me off and pick me up.

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weston.front

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #6 on: 11:13:27, 03/02/21 »
The Cheviot hills are another 'blank spot on the map', as far as I am concerned - must visit soon.

I agree wholeheartedly, I managed a route which P shaped as a totally circular circuit would have involved too much bog for my liking!

https://westonfront.wordpress.com/2019/11/02/a-wild-camping-wander-in-the-cheviots/

I can commend the section of the Pennine Way which goes through the Pennines, but if I did this again I'd not head in to Wooler, but instead I'd wild camp for another night.  I guess I was still building my experience and confidence at this point.  Now I'd happily go away for 5-7 days and avoid campsites throughout.
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richardh1905

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #7 on: 14:46:48, 03/02/21 »
 O0


The SW corner of Forest of Bowland has some quite shapely hills.


..and I really fancy that ridge between Scotland and England, but I might be tempted to start from the south, gaining access via the minor road that cuts into the hills. More chance of a good circular route, maybe.
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weston.front

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #8 on: 15:34:56, 03/02/21 »

The SW corner of Forest of Bowland has some quite shapely hills.

I will pass that on, she will be flattered by the compliment  ;D
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richardh1905

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #9 on: 16:27:36, 03/02/21 »
 :o :o :D
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weston.front

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #10 on: 22:26:38, 06/02/21 »
Remember the summer of 2018, when the sun was cracking the flags for months on end?  Even Lancashire had a totally unprecedented period of dry weather, 10 weeks without rain as I recall. For those not familiar with the landscape of the Forest of Bowland, the high ground is mostly peat covered with a smattering of gritstone.  The combination of this and the high rainfall here in the West means traversing the Bowland Fells is normally requires a wetsuit and snorkel rather than boots and walking poles... So on the rare occasions when we get more that two weeks without rain (which is termed a drought around here) it is the perfect time to head up into these Fells.  The area surrounding Ward's Stone, the highest peak in Bowland is described as 'tricky walking, picking your way between the bogs'.  Not only was it dry for my mini adventure, the top layer of moss was so dry as to be crispy underfoot.


Welcome to The Hot One! :     https://westonfront.wordpress.com/2018/07/28/the-hot-one/



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weston.front

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Re: Micro adventures on The Weston Front
« Reply #11 on: 17:19:56, 12/02/21 »
Having pretty much exhausted all the options with the Forest of Bowland, I then headed further afield.  A couple of years back I walked the first half of Wainwright's Pennine Journey route with Mrs W, walking between B&B's.  Granny is no longer fit enough to look after junior to facilitate such time away and until he's a bit bigger this restricts how far we can go as a family.  Thankfully Mrs W is very kind to me and let me go solo whilst she and Junior did their own thing.  Thus my traverse along Hadrian's Wall and back towards Settle was done with a tent and some minor tweaks to the route.  The outbound walk was good (https://westonfront.wordpress.com/2017/05/15/a-pennine-journey-part-1-1/), but I'd definitely say that the return leg is the better part of the walk:


My Pennine Journey : https://westonfront.wordpress.com/2019/09/09/my-pennine-journey/
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