Author Topic: Zebra Stainless Steel Pots .. possible alternative to titanium  (Read 638 times)

wbmkk

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I intend wild camping again this year after a break of well over 12 years so need some equipment.

It seems the small titanium pots are all the rage now, but crikey .. they are expensive for what they are

While looking for something else I found this site, selling Zebra stainless steel pots, which may be an alternative, although of course, these will be heavier than titanium

Has anybody used these and if so, what are their thoughts on them?

Jetboils and alternative designs / brands are often mentioned, but I already have an MSR Pocket Rocket, so just need a decent small pot.

Link to site is ..https://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/pots-pans-and-mugs/SC127-130.html


Update ... Just seen a review on YouTube .. no side handle which makes it awkward to pour water from them
« Last Edit: 10:57:22, 02/02/21 by wbmkk »

fernman

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no side handle which makes it awkward to pour water from them

For years I used a little alluminium billycan with a semi-circular folding handle. You had to pour with where the end of the handle joined the pot pointing downwards. If you tried to pour out of the side of the pot the handle could fold up as you were pouring, with potential nasty consequences. Also as you tilted it further to pour the last small amount your hand was in the way of rising hot steam. So it had to be a very quick job and even with a steady hand it was always a bit hit-and-miss, particularly when pouring into something relatively small like a mug, when 5% at a guess of your hot water would be lost.

I now have a titanium pot of the same capacity that has folding handles on the side. These get quite hot, so they need holding with a j-cloth, and if I haven't turned the stove off first the lower bits of the cloth usually catch light! The alternative of turning the stove out first is obviously more sensible except it is usually finely balanced on uneven grass with a pot of boiling water on top of it, so there is just as much risk, if not more. But it is definitely easier to pour from this pot, which is also taller and a smaller diameter than the old alluminium one. I think the ideal would be one with a bit of a spout on the rim.

Peak

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Fernman,  with regard to the handles on your Ti pot you can purchase silicon covers that  you cut to length and then slide on. Available at Speedster stoves online, you may already know but could be good for others.

vghikers

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Quote
Just seen a review on YouTube .. no side handle which makes it awkward to pour water from them

In winter we boil in a titanium pot with no handles, but have a separate MSR pan-grab that eliminates the problem of fixed hot handles. It's aluminium and very light. We can grab the pot securely anywhere on the rim for pouring.
Never tried the steel ones I'm afraid.

windyrigg

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I've used titanium and aluminium and prefer the later, they are lighter and no burnt on food at the hot spots.

richardh1905

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Have you considered aluminium pots? Very cheap, light, and they do the job. Titanium is fine if you are just boiling water, but you get hot spots and is rubbish to cook anything in.


Edit - windyrigg beat me to it by 40 seconds!
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richardh1905

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...having said that, I am looking to buy a titanium mug, about 500ml, for lightweight wild camping, where I will only be boiling water for tea or noodles etc.
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richardh1905

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Had a look at the Zebra pots - they are heavy! Not a good choice for lightweight camping, in my opinion.
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zuludog

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For years I used a 1,5l Trangia pan and a simple plain 600ml s/s pan with no handles, but it also worked with a Trangia pan grip
I never got the hang of a meths burner, so I used them on a gas stove
I don't know what was the make of the s/s pan, I found it just loose in a camping shop sale years ago
I was happy enough with the s/s pan, so as far as i'm concerned there's nothing wrong with s/s for a backpacking stove

I used that combination for years, but then I wanted something a bit lighter, so I got an HX pan set from Go Outdoors and it's excellent

I'm not going to get bogged down in the mental arithmetic of whether the extra weight of an HX pan is offset by the weight of the fuel savings.
For that size of pan the difference will only be a few grams either way
But the increase in efficiency and therefore the reduction in boiling time is very noticeable, and i'm now fully converted to HX pans; I'll definitely choose HX pans in future

That pan is aluminium alloy and still available; in a sale at the moment. It includes a small pan lid, just enough for a brew -

Go Outdoors  OEX Sola - X 19, which is a very reasonable price
Search YouTube for 'OEX Camping pans' there are several reviews

Otherwise Search t'Net for heat exchanger camping pans. I've seen them on Ultralight Outdoors; Backpacking Light; and Amazon; and probably other suppliers as well
« Last Edit: 12:40:19, 02/02/21 by zuludog »

weston.front

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Ti pans from Alpkit are more keenly priced.  Both lightweight Ti and Stainless steel end up with hot spots and burnt on food, doubly so if you use a petrol stove. 


I use an Alpkit 650 ml Ti cooking mug and find it excellent, but then I only use it for boiling water as I save weight and time by using freeze dried food.  Pre-COVID my preferred approach was just to make a brew on my stove and have dinner in pubs en route for LDP's.  Given that I've stepped back from this to wildcamping I figure that even at 7 / meal that freeze dried food is in fact a cheaper option than the pub for equivalent convenience
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weston.front

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Wow, those Zebra pots are heavy!
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Peak

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I also have the Alpkit 650 pot, as good as any out there. Couple it with a Speedster  pot stand/ windshield and Speedster alcohol burner and you have the perfect lightweight setup IMO.

fernman

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Fernman,  with regard to the handles on your Ti pot you can purchase silicon covers that  you cut to length and then slide on. Available at Speedster stoves online, you may already know but could be good for others.

Thanks for the tip. They're out of stock, but I can wait. I presume the tubes are split so you can fit them? Interesting site, I've bookmarked it.


Both lightweight Ti and Stainless steel end up with hot spots and burnt on food, doubly so if you use a petrol stove.

Not a problem for me, I only boil water and you can't burn that  :)

windyrigg

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My titanium mug is an Alpkit Mi-Ti (spell?) which I agree is good for boiling water. Capacity is 600ml and my Coleman F1 stove, gas canister and lighter, tea bags etc, fit inside

Peak

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Fernman,
The silicon is not split, you just remove the pot handles and slide them on, a little washing up liquid helps with this. I've used Speedster for a couple of years now, started with their 30ml burner, after that it just snowballed, great service.