Author Topic: DIFFERENT TENTS  (Read 624 times)

Slowcoach

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DIFFERENT TENTS
« on: 09:53:35, 06/02/21 »
Do you have different tents for different types of camping?
Do you have a tent you reserve for back packing and a larger tent for car camping when using a campsite as a base?
What size do you use for each.

« Last Edit: 10:18:28, 06/02/21 by Slowcoach »
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weston.front

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #1 on: 10:46:14, 06/02/21 »
I am fortunate to be able to say yes to this.  Ever since I was a Venture Scout I've had a backpacking and a base camping tent.  The breadth of designs and from this sizes and weights is staggering today, which is why I wrote and article on the subject:


https://westonfront.wordpress.com/2021/01/21/backpacking-tents-a-comprehensive-design-review/


We've gone the whole hog with our 'car camping' and have a VW camper - definitely not something I'd like to strap to my pack and carry ;-). Ahead of this luxury we used a geodesic design for base camping, 'cos if you don't have to carry it, why not have the strongest, most spacious design available.  Actually this tent was bought for a cycle tour of Iceland where we expected the potential for wild weather, but it has served us very well for the past 20 years as well.


My backpacking is now done solo, so I've gone as light as possible for this within the limits of robustness and quality which form the boundaries on all my kit choices.  Whilst I had been a lifetime tunnel tent sceptic, the advent of YouTube has broken this prejudice and I use a single hoop tunnel for backpacking.  This winter I treated myself to a Hilleberg Soulo for the winter and wilder weather because my long standing Ebay search came up with one at a very good price.  This weights 1 kg more than my '3 season' tent so is not something I'd carry all year, but so far it seems to live up to it's reputation - https://bit.ly/3hqjo6G . If it wasn't for this damn lockdown it's something I'd be out in this weekend!  My son is currently seven, if when he is a bit older and if he wants to go backpacking with me, and I hope he does, then I'll be looking for a lightweight two man and for that I'd probably opt for a dome tent.

I know I am fortunate to be able to have more than one tent in my armoury, not a luxury which is an option to all.  If I had to use one tent for everything I think it would have to be a dome design as these offer, in my experience of pitching and using many many designs, the best compromise of space / weight / strength.
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fernman

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #2 on: 16:08:52, 06/02/21 »
Yes to the OP's question.

I have a Zephyros 1 for wild camping, and a Sunncamp Silhouette 200 for base camp use. Example: https://www.towsure.com/sunncamp-silhouette-200-2-person-tent

Chosen because I can stand up in it and move about freely, my primary reason was that it is supported on 4 external poles, making it easy for me to put up on my own. Its predecessor had fibreglass poles that had to be bent into a curve which was very diificult for one person alone to do. But the bedroom isn't quite wide enough - air mattresses on the floor would be fine but as the sides taper upwards, the height of my camp bed makes it a very tight squeeze.

Slowcoach

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #3 on: 16:12:46, 06/02/21 »
Yes to the OP's question.

I have a Zephyros 1 for wild camping, and a Sunncamp Silhouette 200 for base camp use. Example: https://www.towsure.com/sunncamp-silhouette-200-2-person-tent

Chosen because I can stand up in it and move about freely, my primary reason was that it is supported on 4 external poles, making it easy for me to put up on my own. Its predecessor had fibreglass poles that had to be bent into a curve which was very diificult for one person alone to do. But the bedroom isn't quite wide enough - air mattresses on the floor would be fine but as the sides taper upwards, the height of my camp bed makes it a very tight squeeze.

The sunncamp is, i suppose ,what i need. Someting you can put a chair in and sit properly.
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richardh1905

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #4 on: 16:55:07, 06/02/21 »
I've had a variety of tents over the years.

My favourite boot of the car tent was my trusty Vango Force 10 Mk4 (3 man), lasted over 30 years before the cotton fly disintegrated. We even used it on our honeymoon! Plenty of space for two, and bombproof in the way that only traditional Force 10's are.The poles have been re-purposed as awning poles for our large family tent.

Another long lived tent is our Wild Country Trisar, which served us well on a trip across Wales, on wild camps in the Highlands and Pyrenees, and more recently with my youngest son at the head of Hayeswater. Still serviceable after 30 years or so, although the fly had to be re-taped and needs re-proofing, and the alloy poles are not as strong as modern equivalents. Quite roomy for two inside, but has a small porch and is heavy at 3.3kg. Still of use, occasionally. Not a tent that I would replace like for like, though.

For family camping we have a Coleman Mosedale 5(man)- the "Mosedale Whale", and I dislike it intensely. Fibreglass poles (I've already had to replace one section), plastic windows, wobbles like a jelly in strong winds, 17kg of misery! But it was cheap, has loads of  space and it does make a good summer midge free base camp in sheltered places like Glen Nevis, nice to be able to retreat from the little [censored]****s.

My most recent purchase is a Lightwave T10 Trek one man tunnel tent, my wild camping tent. Got it cheap as it is a discontinued model, and it is proving to be a real toughie, with DAC poles and 40d silnylon. The modern equivalent is the T10 Trail. I really like it.




« Last Edit: 17:01:10, 06/02/21 by richardh1905 »
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Stube

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #5 on: 18:11:32, 06/02/21 »
I also have multiple tents for different uses.
 
My little used basecamp tent is a cheapo from Decathlon, but one I can stand up in with plenty of room - but far too heavy to take walkies.
 
My backpacking tents are all sub 1.3 kg and some much less.
 
Perphaps my favourite - certainly the most used in recent years - is a Nordisk Telemark 1 very lightweight and delicate, with condensation issues, but warm and quick to pitch.

My old TN Laser Competiton is heavier and much tougher a true 3 season plus tent, but draftier and slower to pitch.
 
Neither the above are freestanding - my  preferred option - but it comes with a significant weight penalty.  I have a cheap nameless Naturtent clone of a Big Agnes Copper Spur, but it pitches inner first & has an all mesh inner so not ideal.

In lockdown I treated myself to a Trekkertent Saor - stupidly expensive, but the closest I've found to my ideal. Roll on freedom so I can try it out other than in my garden!

richardh1905

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #6 on: 18:14:21, 06/02/21 »
In lockdown I treated myself to a Trekkertent Saor - stupidly expensive, but the closest I've found to my ideal. Roll on freedom so I can try it out other than in my garden!


Is that made of Dyneema?
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fernman

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #7 on: 18:16:02, 06/02/21 »
The sunncamp is, i suppose ,what i need. Someting you can put a chair in and sit properly.

It is ideal for that. I've sent you a PM, so as not to fill the forum with non walking-related stuff.

Slowcoach

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #8 on: 18:41:04, 06/02/21 »
Thanks
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Birdman

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #9 on: 19:38:16, 06/02/21 »
I currently use 3 different tents

1) Vango Tempest 300 for car camping. Weight doesn't matter and its cheap so no worries. And it's spacious for 1 person.
2) Terra Nova Voyager Superlight for backpacking when the conditions are predominantly wet (Scotland, Sweden, Patagonia etc)
3) Tarptent Double Rainbow for backpacking when conditions are predominantly dry (American West, Central and Western Australia, Thailand in dry season, South Downs Way in England, etc)

Number 3) is my favourite because of its versatility and because of the large amount of mesh when fully opened. It gives me the best touch with nature while still being bug proof and stopping most dew. It is also incredibly spacious and fast to pitch and break up. It's not the best for very rough weather, though I have survived surprisingly rough weather in it.



My Terra Nova Voyager Superlight on the Kungsleden (Sweden)



My Tarptent Double Rainbow on the Pacific Crest Trail (USA)
« Last Edit: 19:45:14, 06/02/21 by Birdman »
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archaeoroutes

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #10 on: 09:38:44, 07/02/21 »
Yes.
Carpacking - some big job from Vango with two bedrooms and a living room
Base camp - Mountain Hardware Trango 2
Normal multi-day walking - ME Dragonfly
Fast stuff - Goretex bivvi bag
Tactical stuff - IFS
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Stube

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #11 on: 21:11:42, 07/02/21 »
In reply to @richardh1905
Yes, the Trekkertent Saor is dcf.

richardh1905

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #12 on: 07:54:00, 08/02/21 »
In reply to @richardh1905
Yes, the Trekkertent Saor is dcf.
Thanks - looks like a very capable tent. I'm sure that he used to do a silnylon version.
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Stube

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Re: DIFFERENT TENTS
« Reply #13 on: 17:01:46, 08/02/21 »
Yes he did then stopped the silnylon option  a year or so ago. I think the stretchy nature of silnylon caused too many problems.