Author Topic: Meindl Bhutan MFS, overkill for South West English countryside? :(  (Read 564 times)

SJG1711

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Morning all! I'm on a quest to pick out my first hiking boot and settled on the Meindl Bhutan MFS. They arrived yesterday and while I love them, I'm starting to wonder if they're suited to what I need. I live in the South West, so no real mountains or major hills here and most of my walking will be done on the Cotswold Way and occasionally Dartmoor and Exmoor. I've noticed these boots are fairly stiff soled, how would they perform on the English countryside? I've heard some call them overkill, money wise I'm not too bothered as I DO like them and know they've got a reputation for being well built and long lasting, but is it overkill to the point where it would become uncomfortable? As I said I'm only really going to use them in the countryside, 10-20 miles or so, with the occasional backpacking trip. In my mind I always thought I needed a nice flexible springy boot, but I bought the Bhutan on reviews alone and have since discovered it might be better suited for mountains and such. What do you guys think? Too stiff for countryside rambling? If so does anyone have any other suggestions for boots? Preferably all leather, suited for the landscape around me. With all the shops shut, it's an absolute pain in the [censored] buying boots! No worries, I haven't wore them outside yet.
 PS. I'm aware of trail runners, I'll be buying some in the summer however for the amount of mud we get around here my heart is set on a nice leather boot. Cheers guys!

Looking to spend £150-240
« Last Edit: 02:23:02, 19/02/21 by SJG1711 »

pauldawes

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Boots are so subjective. On non technical walking you’re considering, I’d have just gone to a shop with plenty of different boots, tried on loads and gone with the one you found most comfortable. All the better...of course..if it was a place that employed qualified boot fitters.


I wouldn’t bother about the stiffness of the sole...actually that’s probably better, reduces constant flexing of the foot and is less tiring, more comfortable on long walks. But it’s certainly possible for walking you intend doing you could have found a lighter boot (or walking shoe).

Slowcoach

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If you like them and they are comfortable that’s it. Enjoy them.
It's all uphill from here.

Peak

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I have the Bhutan's, great boots, but I only wear them for winter conditions in the Peak District. As you say it may be overkill but theres only one way to find out.

Ridge

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I also have them and think they are great. I wear them for all my walking a lot of which is in the fields and woods just to the north of London.
Are they over-kill? Almost definitely. Do I care so long as my feet are comfy and dry? Not at all.

pdstsp

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I also have them and think they are great. I wear them for all my walking a lot of which is in the fields and woods just to the north of London.
Are they over-kill? Almost definitely. Do I care so long as my feet are comfy and dry? Not at all.


I will second everything here.  I too am a Bhutan wearer and love them.  I don't care if they are overkill, they are comfortable and waterproof.

forgotmyoldpassword

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In theory the flex might fatigue your foot a little more, but in practical sense - as others have said - if you're comfortable you almost forget what type of boots you have on and as long as they do the job that's the ideal situation.  Impossible to say how a boot will fit you but I'd encourage any walker considering boots to put a few more quid in to a good pair rather than bargain basement prices on a questionable brand.  At least for the sort of walking I do, it makes a huge difference in comfort if they fit/don't rub my feet.

windyrigg

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Great boots, I've walked miles in them over years, maybe 3 pairs by now. They are still my default bad weather / winter / hill boot, but I have various lighter options for good weather / summer etc. They should be comfy all year round - and they are really well made.   

Peak

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This forum is becoming a great advert for Meindl, hope someone from the company is reading and sorts out some freebies for us. Only joking, but we obviously love our Meindl Buthan's.

Peak

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Meindl Buthan's.
Modify message
Should have read  Bhutan's

sussamb

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Another vote for the Bhutan. Bought mine nearly 2 years ago, never let me down including on my Coast to Coast last March when the weather was pretty awful and when it wasn't conditions underfoot were very soggy.
Where there's a will ...

fernman

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I wore Meindl Borneo boots, which were the predecessor to the Bhutans, for quite a few years and for all sorts of walking: mostly on day walks in the Chilterns, but also on society field trips, solo days out botanising when I frequently went off piste, and on multiple-day walks with wild camping in parts of Snowdonia that were often pathless. So I would advise you to stop feeling so self-conscious and enjoy your boots!

SJG1711

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Crikey chaps, I half wanted you to convince me I was right. I guess I'll have to keep them now haha! I can see where you're all coming from though, they are incredibly comfy, the insole might have to be replaced, but other than that no real complaints. Just a few fitting questions though. I lied, I have two new Bhutans, one in Size 11 (my "true" size) and another half a size up, 11.5. While I much prefer the comfort on the 11.5's, they are on the verge of being too big. There's no heel lift but there is some VERY minor excess leather on the toe box and inner sides of my arches if I squeeze the boot where I'm not filling it out entirely. But nothing uncomfortably so, although I've only been walking around the house. Now in comparison the smaller boot, the Size 11, ALSO fits comfortably, however I find after an hour or so my big toes nails start to get achey, possibly toe box not being wide enough? My toes don't hit the end of either boot, so I'm confused.


If I were go with the 11.5's, once the boots have broken in, would they eventually stretch and become too large further adding to the excess leather problem? I have yet to take into account foot swelling, thicker socks, and new insoles.
If I were to go for the Size 11s, would the boot eventually stretch once broken in, giving me a little more wiggle room in the toe box? Length is fine for both boots, although I do appreciate the extra length of the larger boot. It's amazing the difference of half a size.


...or do I just send them both back and wishfully hope for all the shops to open soon so I can go and get fitted? (Noooooooooo!). Any advice is highly appreciated, apologies for not getting back to you all sooner, I've taken in all your replies and had a chuckle at how much positivity these boots have, can't say I was expecting so many replies, otherwise I'd have checked earlier. Cheers again guys!
« Last Edit: 05:24:21, 20/02/21 by SJG1711 »

SJG1711

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Edit: Whoops, not spam, accidentally quoted my entire post.

pauldawes

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Standard fitting advice is to always leave just a bit of toe room.


For two main reasons, first your feet expand a bit once you’re a hour or three into the walk. Secondly as you go up/ down inclines the toes get “thrown” forward a bit and if no “toe room” the big toe will rub against boot from time to time...if that happens too often you get bruising.


So, if your gut feeling is the 11.5 are more comfortable, I’d certainly go with those. As a general rule modern boots don’t become significantly more comfortable once they “break in”...if they are not comfortable straight out of the box don’t buy them