Author Topic: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?  (Read 875 times)

sussamb

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #15 on: 19:09:32, 02/04/21 »
Going uphill is one time when you really need to think about your lungs tidal volume. We generally only breathe out a small proportion of the air in our lungs. The rest is like the tide, hence the name, as just as it is about to escape you breathe in again and it recedes. 


The result is that the tidal volume is low on oxygen, so unable to help oxygenate your body and particularly your muscles, and with low oxygen your muscles tire. Concentrate when going uphill on emptying the lungs so the tidal volume is as low as possible. Deep slow breaths in and out, every so often, will increase the oxygen levels and get the tiredness out of your legs, allowing you to increase your speed or plod on for longer, whichever you prefer.


This assumes of course the oxygen has some fuel to burn, so keep your blood sugars up through regular snacking if you can, but particularly before long, or steep, or both ascents.
Where there's a will ...

Birdman

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #16 on: 19:30:03, 02/04/21 »
Slow and steady gets you on top of every hill, even when carrying lots of weight. Avoid going out of breath.


Psychologically, it helps to cut the effort into bite sized targets. Like: "I am going to get to that rock over there". Once there, you make a new target. etc. Finally you will get there.
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Birdman

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #17 on: 19:37:37, 02/04/21 »
This reminds me of when I visited Switzerland for the first time as a teenager. The first time I ever saw a mountain (I grew up in the Netherlands). When hiking up the mountain, we passed an old granny (a local!) who walked really slowly up the mountain. Step...............step...............step...... etc. We were laughing. "How long will it take her to arrive?". When we were about halfway, we were completely knackered and needed a long rest. Guess who overtook us while we were resting? I have always remembered this.
My travel and walking reports: https://www.hikingbirdman.com/

BuzyG

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #18 on: 22:31:28, 02/04/21 »
Guess I"m still young at heart. Both mentally and physically.  I still just go for it and keep going until I hit the top. 

Short steps high cadence, steady full deep breaths. Lots of carbs at regular intervals early on in the day.  Same pattern as when I was in my teens really.  But obviously not quite as quickly.  If the ground gets really though/ steep or both then I start looking down and glancing maybe 20:yards ahead to the next boulder or tree and set that as the target trying never to look past it until the slope eases.

Doesn't always work.  In very hot weather I have come unstuck a few times, when my heart beat has gone off the sensible scale and I've had to simply stop my normal rythm rest a while then completely regig to a far slower pace.  Much prefer UK winter temps.

ninthace

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #19 on: 22:38:33, 02/04/21 »
This reminds me of when I visited Switzerland for the first time as a teenager. The first time I ever saw a mountain (I grew up in the Netherlands). When hiking up the mountain, we passed an old granny (a local!) who walked really slowly up the mountain. Step...............step...............step...... etc. We were laughing. "How long will it take her to arrive?". When we were about halfway, we were completely knackered and needed a long rest. Guess who overtook us while we were resting? I have always remembered this.
Same sort of thing happened to me many years ago near Engelberg.  Hiking uphill to a refuge - overtaken by a party of primary schools kids that did not even stop chattering.  We pretended to be interested in the scenery.
Solvitur Ambulando

Deerplay

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #20 on: 23:14:42, 02/04/21 »
Long time since I posted on this forum, but I do recall advice off an alpine guide some 30 years ago. "Walk until you are out of breath, then slow down and keep going". Seems to reinforce the slow but steady approach. (like the tortoise and the hare). Still works for me and employed it today on walk up Skiddaw via Ullock Pike etc. Didn't notice any significant difference between my pace and those somewhat younger than me.
Will this wind be so mighty as to lay low the mountains?

pdstsp

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #21 on: 07:57:27, 03/04/21 »
This reminds me of when I visited Switzerland for the first time as a teenager. The first time I ever saw a mountain (I grew up in the Netherlands). When hiking up the mountain, we passed an old granny (a local!) who walked really slowly up the mountain. Step...............step...............step...... etc. We were laughing. "How long will it take her to arrive?". When we were about halfway, we were completely knackered and needed a long rest. Guess who overtook us while we were resting? I have always remembered this.


I had exactly the same experience on the GR5, except the old granny was a young physicist.  She laughed at us and said you could always tell English walkers as they tried to charge up the mountains.  As a result I now go into "alpine mode" on hills and rarely stop, though movement is sometimes imperceptible  O0

Steveandsam

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #22 on: 20:37:27, 03/04/21 »
All of that is rubbish.... Cheese sandwiches and loads and loads of swearing... You'll get there.

Squacco

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #23 on: 11:20:44, 17/04/21 »
Thanks Sussamb I ll definitely be employing your breathing advice as that worked a lot when I was doing a lot of cycling in February . Constant breathing whilst cycling doubled my cycling distance and increased stamina . i ll also follow what the pro cyclist top hill climbers do in shedding as much weight as possible, I ve even seen them dumping energy gels and water bottles half way up the long steep climbs ..   Walking shoes which weigh 320 grms rather than 750 grams each  are an obvious start as are  lightweight clothing , anything to lower the grams when you re fighting the forces of gravity .I ll be doing the Cleveland Way again once overnights are allowed but the pack weight will be drastically lower than the last two trips and be under a total of 8 kgs with my new 500 gram Terra Nova tent helping out . Cleveland Way has many very steep  short sections on the coastal walk from Saltburn to Filey and some training is needed I ve found.  I m from a virtually total flat area around Doncaster so  I m practicing again where I can find some artificial steep hills . Its no good setting off unprepared as a flatlander hitting the steep hills at age 71.. I did the Pennine Way twice in my 30 s in 13 days with no preparation at all and carrying too much weight but those days have long gone
« Last Edit: 11:38:18, 17/04/21 by Squacco »

gunwharfman

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #24 on: 12:26:36, 17/04/21 »
"Those days are long gone" I experience this problem as well these days. So many things to do and places to see but so little time left perhaps. At least I've got good knees and feet.  :)

WhitstableDave

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #25 on: 13:00:53, 17/04/21 »
Thanks Sussamb I ll definitely be employing your breathing advice ...

 :( ...which I gave in Reply #3 much earlier. Oh well, perhaps I wasn't being technical enough.  ;)

Anyway, I agree with you about the advantages of lightweight walking shoes over much heavier boots. But you needn't settle for 320g shoes - Inov-8 makes excellent trail shoes that weigh even less. I've got a pair of Trailroc G280 shoes that are cushioned, comfortable and grippy, and weigh just (you've guessed it)... 280g.   :)

Percy

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #26 on: 13:07:20, 17/04/21 »
Slowly, slowly, catchy monkey. Thatís my technique.


You get out of puff going uphill but I prefer ascent to descent. Even with walking poles my ageing joints grumble going downhill.

Percy

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #27 on: 13:12:50, 17/04/21 »
This thread has reminded me of a biology lesson many years ago where there was some apparatus for measuring lung capacity. My friend, who was both 6í7Ē and a tuba player, had an impressive set of lungs on him.

MkPotato

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #28 on: 07:20:43, 18/04/21 »
All of that is rubbish.... Cheese sandwiches and loads and loads of swearing... You'll get there.
That made me laugh! 👍


I did an unexpectedly difficult walk in the Lakes last week (up Kirk Fell and down from Wind Gap into Mosedale) - didnít take any sandwiches, so was running entirely on swearing!

scRambles

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Re: Getting to the top, do you have a method to get there?
« Reply #29 on: 19:31:58, 18/04/21 »
Head down, one foot in-front of the other  :D  having had a few heart ops in my younger days i'm always mindful not to overexert myself for the sake of getting to the top quickly, it's still going to be there regardless of pace and more often i'm "listening" with my feet to the terrain and adjusting accordingly. A good example is William Clough vs Jacobs Ladder, going up the Clough route is slightly more easier on the legs and lungs despite Jacob's Ladder looking simple to do on a map.


If in doubt at all, take a few minutes to recompose and rehydrate.